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letting in the clutch (when driving a car) Options
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2017 9:32:09 AM

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Hello!

He let in the clutch with a roar and leapt up the narrow street.
(Agatha Christie "Ten Little Niggers")

I know what "the clutch" is. And I understand from the context that to let it in means to release the pedal, i.e. to mechanically connect the engine to the auto's wheels... Am I right on this? If so, what would be the opposite action, i.e. if one presses the pedal, what would one call this act - "to press the clutch" or what?

Thanks!
FounDit
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2017 10:45:03 AM

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Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
Hello!

He let in the clutch with a roar and leapt up the narrow street.
(Agatha Christie "Ten Little Niggers")

I know what "the clutch" is. And I understand from the context that to let it in means to release the pedal, i.e. to mechanically connect the engine to the auto's wheels... Am I right on this? If so, what would be the opposite action, i.e. if one presses the pedal, what would one call this act - "to press the clutch" or what?

Thanks!


Yes, you are correct. In AmE we would say "let the clutch out", and in slang to "pop" the clutch when done quickly, but since Agatha Christie is British, this may be the BrE phrasing. Stepping on the pedal is simply described as "step, or stepping on the clutch". Not sure if BrE is different on this.

I suppose the BrE wording comes from letting the clutch pedal out to "engage" the clutch, thus letting the clutch "in".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:16:34 PM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
FounDit wrote:
Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
Hello!

He let in the clutch with a roar and leapt up the narrow street.
(Agatha Christie "Ten Little Niggers")

I know what "the clutch" is. And I understand from the context that to let it in means to release the pedal, i.e. to mechanically connect the engine to the auto's wheels... Am I right on this? If so, what would be the opposite action, i.e. if one presses the pedal, what would one call this act - "to press the clutch" or what?

Thanks!


Yes, you are correct. In AmE we would say "let the clutch out", and in slang to "pop" the clutch when done quickly, but since Agatha Christie is British, this may be the BrE phrasing. Stepping on the pedal is simply described as "step, or stepping on the clutch". Not sure if BrE is different on this.

I suppose the BrE wording comes from letting the clutch pedal out to "engage" the clutch, thus letting the clutch "in".


Yes we engage the clutch, the opposite action pushing down on the clutch pedal is to release the clutch.


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
coag
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2017 1:57:45 PM

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This is a confusing question even in dictionaries. BrE and AmE describe the engaging and disengaging of the clutch in opposite way. The Oxford gives contradicting examples.

Oxford
let in (or out) the clutch
phrase
Engage (or release) the clutch of a vehicle by releasing pressure on (or applying it to) the clutch pedal.

1. The driver gives them five seconds to find a seat, then pushes the gear handle and lets in the clutch.
5. The driver stood on the accelerator, let out the clutch and roared away with tyres screaming.
7. I don't know exactly what happened at the start - I just let out the clutch and suddenly the engine shut down.’

(In my opinion, examples 5 and 7 are contradicting to example 1 and to the example in the original post.)

Webster Learner's
let out [phrasal verb]
let (something or someone) out or let out (something or someone) : to release (something or someone)

Let the clutch out slowly.

My ESL conclusion is, in technical sense it's safest to say "engage" and "disengage" the clutch. "Release" the clutch can be confusing.
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 6:02:40 AM

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Wow, so much new information in response to a seemingly simple question!

So I understand one:
lets the clutch in (BE) or out (AE) to engage the clutch
and
steps on the clutch to release it

This is some new stuff for me, thank you very much, everybody!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 6:36:03 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
coag wrote:
This is a confusing question even in dictionaries. BrE and AmE describe the engaging and disengaging of the clutch in opposite way. The Oxford gives contradicting examples.

Oxford
let in (or out) the clutch
phrase
Engage (or release) the clutch of a vehicle by releasing pressure on (or applying it to) the clutch pedal.

1. The driver gives them five seconds to find a seat, then pushes the gear handle and lets in the clutch.
5. The driver stood on the accelerator, let out the clutch and roared away with tyres screaming.
7. I don't know exactly what happened at the start - I just let out the clutch and suddenly the engine shut down.’

(In my opinion, examples 5 and 7 are contradicting to example 1 and to the example in the original post.)

Webster Learner's
let out [phrasal verb]
let (something or someone) out or let out (something or someone) : to release (something or someone)

Let the clutch out slowly.

My ESL conclusion is, in technical sense it's safest to say "engage" and "disengage" the clutch. "Release" the clutch can be confusing.


Using "Release" the clutch is not confusing if everyone in a country uses the same terminology.

It's a Pavement/Sidewalk type issue.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 10:39:31 AM
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I've been waiting for someone here to mention it - but the title? Of the book?

Thing is, the book is no longer published under that name - in fact I don't think it has been since the '50s. It's called Ten Little Indians now, I think.

We have no idea how many black posters we have here on TFD, nor how many read these pages. But, as we are a public Dictionary Site I think we should be clear in saying that the word nigger in the original title of this book above - written in another era - is now considered to be the worst word in the American lexicon - and is offensive to other people all over the world from Africa to Papua New Guinea? And we aren't sanctioning its use.

And Kirill, mate, no-one is saying anything about you just about a word. One that is considered not sexually offensive, but racially offensive.

(As the poster is learning English no-one, I hope, would take offence. But BECAUSE he is learning English, I think it's better to explain & risk a possible minor embarrassment, now than a possible black eye later on!!Speak to the hand )
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 12:18:41 PM

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Addendum to Romany's post - the title it became is just as bad here in Canada. Our Indigenous people are called the Indigenous or First Nations people. It may now be "Ten Little Soldiers".

The vocabulary is changed and it is good that learners know that - but too bad we can't change history no matter how hard we try.

A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
George Weischadle
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 2:00:03 PM

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The truly scary thing is, we might write something today that will be deemed politically incorrect tomorrow. Oh dear! Perhaps we should refrain from writing altogether!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:01:32 PM

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I it might be because we were focused on answering the question, rather than noticing the problem with the book title.

Sometimes you cannot see what's right in front of your face.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 6:09:29 PM

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almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 6:40:46 PM
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_Then_There_Were_None

It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers,[3] after the British blackface song, which serves as a major plot point.[4][5] The US edition was not released until December 1939; its American reprints and adaptations were all retitled And Then There Were None, after the last five words in the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians".[6]

******

The original title (Ten Little Niggers) still survives in a few foreign-language versions of the novel, such as the Bulgarian title Десет малки негърчета, and was used in other languages for a time, for example in the Dutch publication until the 18th edition of 1994.[citation needed] The title Ten Little Negroes continues to be commonly used in foreign-language versions, for example in Spanish, Greek, Serbian, Romanian,[14] French[15] and Hungarian, as well as a 1987 Russian film adaptation Десять негритят (Desyat Negrityat). In 1999, the Slovak National Theatre staged the play under its original title but changed to A napokon nezostal už nik (And Then There Were None) mid-run.[16]



almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 7:02:43 PM
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To twist Cleveland's nickname into a slur against American Indians takes a creative mind.


usatoday.com/story/opinion/


**************



Don't bully Chief Wahoo out of existence



www.cleveland.com/opinion/






Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 10:09:32 AM

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Oops... I've known the story under this name since was a child, first as a Russian film version, and then reading the Russian translation when I was like 12 or 13, both titled alike...

But if it reads wrong these days, okay - I'll call it differently with my next question :) Thanks for advising me on this.
Are Ten Little Indians good enough? :) It's shorter than the other option.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 11:28:22 AM
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I would have thought so: "Indian" isn't an offensive word. People from France are French, from England are English, and from India are Indian. People's nationalities aren't offensive: just the words some people use to describe that nationality.

In the Playschool my kids went to they'd sing the song that the title of the book is based upon, as "Ten Little Indians" and I've noticed the kids here do too so it has to be OK, I guess.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 8:56:44 AM

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Romany wrote:
the word nigger in the original title of this book above - written in another era - is now considered to be the worst word in the American lexicon

Can I say negro? Or this is offensive too?

Hope123 wrote:
Addendum to Romany's post - the title it became is just as bad here in Canada. Our Indigenous people are called the Indigenous or First Nations people. It may now be "Ten Little Soldiers".

No, Hope123! Those were East Indians in the title. :) As I remember "indigenous people" were called Indians and Natives in Winnipeg and I didn't notice anybody meant it to be offensive.

And I wonder if soldiers should take it as an offence. :)

almo 1 wrote:
as well as a 1987 Russian film adaptation Десять негритят (Desyat Negrityat).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desyat_Negrityat

In Russian the words 'негр' and 'негритенок' have never been offensive.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 6:54:16 PM
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www.youtube.com/Can White People Say Nigga??


***************



www.huffingtonpost.com/Nigger vs Nigga by


quote:
In the song ‘Woman’, rapped by Talib Kweli, he states “she went from being called Nigger to Negro to colored to Black to Afro, to African American and right back to Nigga”. His statement shows the racism behind the word “Nigger” and how people of African descent fought to be labeled respectfully, to reflect the beauty of their race, yet ended up going back to the original roots of being called “Nigger”, yet justifying that “Nigga” has an entirely different meaning.
unquote:

******************



genius.com/Niggas vs. Black People by Chris Rock


quote:
Now we've got a lot of things, a lot of racism in the world right now, Who's more racist? Black people or white people? Black people, you know why?

Because we hate black people too! Everything white people don't like about black people, black people REALLY don't like about black people. There's some shit going on with black people right now. There's a civil war going on with black people, and there's two sides, there's black people and there's niggas. The niggas have got to go.
unquote:


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