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The uses and abuses of public spaces. Options
rmberwin
Posted: Monday, May 01, 2017 5:08:50 PM

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I live in Glendale, CA, which has a large Armenian population. Today I attended the reopening of the central library, and there is now a sort of grotto, with murals on the walls, devoted to the Armenian genocide. Accompanying it is a stack of books labeled "The genocide collection". Let's say for the sake of argument that the genocide is beyond question. Is this an appropriate use of library space? Even if arguments cannot be made against the display, are there arguments for it? However, I could see the salience of a memorial to slavery, because that is specifically a part of American history.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
TheParser
Posted: Monday, May 01, 2017 6:33:53 PM
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rmberwin wrote:
Is this an appropriate use of library space?


Whether something is appropriate or not does not matter in practical terms.

What matters is political power.

As you said, Glendale has a large Armenian population.

So the city fathers (who are elected) realized that it would be wise to agree to the request to have such a place in the library.

Throughout our country, politically powerful groups are demanding that certain schools change their names and that certain statues come down. And elected officials know that they ignore those requests at their own political peril.

almo 1
Posted: Monday, May 01, 2017 7:37:54 PM
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"It's an emotionally charged and ugly issue — but let's assume, for the sake of discussion, all the allegations, charges and accusations against Imperial-era Japan and its military with regard to those collectively known as “comfort women” are true."


rafu.com/2015/10/into-the-next-stage-confronting-the-comfort-women-issue



rafu.com/2015/10/into-the-next-stage-confronting-the-comfort-women-issue



"Ignatius Y. Ding, is the founder of Global Alliance for Preserving the History of WW II in Asia.

Global Alliance for Preserving the History of WW II in Asia is the anti-Japan lobby group founded in 1994, and it has been spreading false propaganda for over 20 years in order to defame & discredit Japan."

"It is rather ironic to see the founder himself comment here. He is the very Chinese operative that I mentioned in my comment above who uses the comfort women issue to drive a wedge into U.S.-Japan-South Korea security partnership."


whatson
Posted: Monday, May 01, 2017 9:14:34 PM
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There's a Slovak expression for similar situations:
"Ja o koze, ty o voze." (I [am talking] about a goat, you [are talking] about a cart.)

If I were a lame 'un, I wouldn't advertise it.
Elvandil
Posted: Monday, May 01, 2017 11:25:08 PM

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rmberwin wrote:
I live in Glendale, CA, which has a large Armenian population. Today I attended the reopening of the central library, and there is now a sort of grotto, with murals on the walls, devoted to the Armenian genocide. Accompanying it is a stack of books labeled "The genocide collection". Let's say for the sake of argument that the genocide is beyond question. Is this an appropriate use of library space? Even if arguments cannot be made against the display, are there arguments for it? However, I could see the salience of a memorial to slavery, because that is specifically a part of American history.


It is rather peculiar that you even ask such a question. Whether it is "appropriate" is something decided by the library staff. And that you think something "American" should be there just speaks of your personal insularity, the attitude that makes Americans more ignorant of the rest of the world than the people of most any other nation.

Libraries cannot sustain themselves any longer by supplying reading materials alone, and the sterility of reading materials for education is finally being recognized. Libraries have become, thankfully even if necessarily, places for books, electronic media, discussions, meetings, debates, displays, socializing, and more. This is a great development and should be celebrated.






(議思不の界世) pןɹoʍ ǝɥʇ ɟo sɹǝpuoʍ ǝɥʇ ɟo ǝuo sı ǝpoɔıun
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 1:33:06 AM
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Glendale Council meeting on Oct.22, 2014



youtube.com//Glendale Council meeting on Oct.22, 2014













"It's an emotionally charged and ugly issue — but let's assume, for the sake of discussion, all the allegations, charges and accusations against Imperial-era Japan and its military with regard to those collectively known as “comfort women” are true."



rafu.com/2015/10/into-the-next-stage-confronting-the-comfort-women-issue






"Ignatius Y. Ding, is the founder of Global Alliance for Preserving the History of WW II in Asia.

Global Alliance for Preserving the History of WW II in Asia is the anti-Japan lobby group founded in 1994, and it has been spreading false propaganda for over 20 years in order to defame & discredit Japan."

"It is rather ironic to see the founder himself comment here. He is the very Chinese operative that I mentioned in my comment above who uses the comfort women issue to drive a wedge into U.S.-Japan-South Korea security partnership."





almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 1:31:57 PM
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10:55 Interview with mayor of Glendale City, California :
27:40 Interview with mayor of Buena Park City, California :




youtube.com/Interview






rmberwin
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 2:32:16 PM

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Elvandil wrote:
rmberwin wrote:
I live in Glendale, CA, which has a large Armenian population. Today I attended the reopening of the central library, and there is now a sort of grotto, with murals on the walls, devoted to the Armenian genocide. Accompanying it is a stack of books labeled "The genocide collection". Let's say for the sake of argument that the genocide is beyond question. Is this an appropriate use of library space? Even if arguments cannot be made against the display, are there arguments for it? However, I could see the salience of a memorial to slavery, because that is specifically a part of American history.


It is rather peculiar that you even ask such a question. Whether it is "appropriate" is something decided by the library staff. And that you think something "American" should be there just speaks of your personal insularity, the attitude that makes Americans more ignorant of the rest of the world than the people of most any other nation.

Libraries cannot sustain themselves any longer by supplying reading materials alone, and the sterility of reading materials for education is finally being recognized. Libraries have become, thankfully even if necessarily, places for books, electronic media, discussions, meetings, debates, displays, socializing, and more. This is a great development and should be celebrated.






It cannot be the case that the library staff gets to unilaterally decide what is appropriate. A renegade staff could then put up a racist display. I don't think that something American "should" be there, but that that criterion would at least offer some rationale for what might be seen as an intrusion into what (to my mind) should be a purely academic space. But to memorialize every conceivable grievance, even if legitimate, seems to me outside of the library's purview. If any community wishes to make better known their history, then certainly a talk or lecture or debate presented in the library's community room would be great.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 4:28:21 PM

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Speaking of memorials, perhaps we could have an All Earth Victims Day Memorial.

On this day, every person on the Earth could wear a hair shirt, place ashes on our heads, and sit by the side of the road throwing dirt into the air, while bemoaning the abuse our group has suffered at the hands of some other group in the planet. Because it is abundantly clear that every group of humans has offended or abused some other group at one time or another in history, it works for everyone.

Having established such a day, we could all demand reparations, the equivalent of one unit of monetary value for our society. And once you have paid your reparation to someone, and they have paid you, we would all believe we’ve actually accomplished something — we all paid, and received reparations for the past sins of our ancestors. We are now all equally recompensed and forgiven. Yea!! Then we could focus on how we actually treat one another today, rather than some time in the past.

(Oh, wait. I forgot. Doing this would require maturity on the part of humans. Ne-e-e-ver mind.)


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
rmberwin
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 5:54:32 PM

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FounDit wrote:
Speaking of memorials, perhaps we could have an All Earth Victims Day Memorial.

On this day, every person on the Earth could wear a hair shirt, place ashes on our heads, and sit by the side of the road throwing dirt into the air, while bemoaning the abuse our group has suffered at the hands of some other group in the planet. Because it is abundantly clear that every group of humans has offended or abused some other group at one time or another in history, it works for everyone.

Having established such a day, we could all demand reparations, the equivalent of one unit of monetary value for our society. And once you have paid your reparation to someone, and they have paid you, we would all believe we’ve actually accomplished something — we all paid, and received reparations for the past sins of our ancestors. We are now all equally recompensed and forgiven. Yea!! Then we could focus on how we actually treat one another today, rather than some time in the past.

(Oh, wait. I forgot. Doing this would require maturity on the part of humans. Ne-e-e-ver mind.)


Yes, I think that you are getting to the point I was trying to make. By allowing just one group to display their misfortunes, it sort of distorts the larger picture.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, May 03, 2017 8:58:34 AM
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rmberwin wrote:
what (to my mind) should be a purely academic space.



Correct!

A library should be a neutral area.

If one were Turkish, one would be very upset to enter that library and see that display.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, May 03, 2017 10:07:19 AM

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rmberwin wrote:


Yes, I think that you are getting to the point I was trying to make. By allowing just one group to display their misfortunes, it sort of distorts the larger picture.


What I was actually attempting was a satirical poke in the eye of the “snowflake” culture that has gained prominence particularly in the last decade.

In my view, they are a people offended. They have been offended since the day of their birth by something, anything, everything, sometimes by their own choices, yet will take no responsibility for any of it. Now, everyone is offended at some point in their lives. For most of us, it happens very often. But we learn to get over it, or live with it. Not these people. Their sense of offense will not permit learning to deal with it, or get over it. No their sense of offense holds everyone else to blame, even when it is their own choices that caused the result.

Having found life itself offensive, they were also offended by the fact they had no political power to do anything about it. Now that they do have some political power, they seek to punish all who offend them (which is basically everyone), finding various means to do so, from legal maneuvers to attempting to silence any form of speech, even a single word, they find offensive. Finding life itself as being used and abused, they find pleasure in using and abusing in turn.

But it will never be enough, because for them, life is a never-ending offense. They look for things to offend them, and find them. Just ask — or don’t — and they will tell you of everything that they find offensive. Turn on any TV and there they are — complaining. Perhaps you have heard of the TV show called The Walking Dead? These people are The walking Offended.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Lotje1000
Posted: Wednesday, May 03, 2017 10:15:35 AM

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And some people get offended at people getting offended.
Lotje1000
Posted: Wednesday, May 03, 2017 10:21:27 AM

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rmberwin wrote:
I don't think that something American "should" be there, but that that criterion would at least offer some rationale for what might be seen as an intrusion into what (to my mind) should be a purely academic space. But to memorialize every conceivable grievance, even if legitimate, seems to me outside of the library's purview. If any community wishes to make better known their history, then certainly a talk or lecture or debate presented in the library's community room would be great.


It seems to me it is an academic opportunity for people to learn about the Armenian genocide. For one, it has opened up this debate so it certainly gets people talking. And as you said, the area has a large Armenian populace, so the information becomes particularly relevant.

I would also not be too quick to label a genocide as a "grievance".
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, May 03, 2017 11:21:10 AM
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Activists and lobbyists will never cease.
It's their business, big industry
and sometimes propaganda factory.

And I believe you shouldn't take it too easy.








In front of Japanese embassy in S.Korea (against the Vienna Convention)





In the park adjacent to the Central Library, Glendale California






Palisades Park, New Jersey






Fairfax County Government Center, Fairfax, Virginia





In the future
almo 1
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 11:21:35 AM
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www.reporternewspapers.net/2017/06/19/Brookhaven park’s neighbors oppose ‘comfort women’ memorial, may sue




Residents living around the Brookhaven park where a controversial “comfort women” memorial is set to be unveiled June 30 are telling the city to find another location or face legal action.









Hope123
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 3:00:19 PM

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rmberwin wrote:
I live in Glendale, CA, which has a large Armenian population. Today I attended the reopening of the central library, and there is now a sort of grotto, with murals on the walls, devoted to the Armenian genocide. Accompanying it is a stack of books labeled "The genocide collection". Let's say for the sake of argument that the genocide is beyond question. Is this an appropriate use of library space? Even if arguments cannot be made against the display, are there arguments for it? However, I could see the salience of a memorial to slavery, because that is specifically a part of American history.


Since our library has all kinds of displays recognizing different groups, or different current topics, or seasonal topics, all recommending many books, I find nothing strange about recognizing diversity and even recognizing the diversity pertinent to that area. They are just offering what they think will be of interest to many of those who live there. However, our libraries do change them up and have variety. Perhaps this will not be a permanent display of recommended books.

Perhaps there might be more than the one motive proffered of "being-offended"for reading such books. Perhaps they want to know about their history. Perhaps more than Armenians might pick up a book and learn something about their neighbors who are Americans too.

I had not thought of politics or of the "being-offended" reason for the display when I read your OP. But since we are now talking about being offended, are you offended yourself by this display?

Elvandil - Applause Applause Applause

A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
Hope123
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 3:49:59 PM

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Well, now I had to go get details about the Armenian Genocide. I had no idea it was so huge.

https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10008189

I agree with FD's ideas that present generations should not be held responsible for the "Sins of the Fathers".

However, if a simple "Gosh, we are sorry what the Canadian government schools did to Indigenous Children in history" helps the Indigenous people to heal from atrocities that still affect their descendants, then why not. A lot of people in the world have been severely wronged in history, which is a little different than just being offended. Edited. - In fact, PM Trudeau is after the Pope to issue a formal apology to them from the Catholic church.

However, as I said, I am not sure of what the motives of the librarians were in recommending those books. If the display had been about the Holocaust, would that have been the same idea, or different?

The problem is that these kinds of atrocities are happening in several parts of the world right now...



A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
almo 1
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 8:05:44 PM
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www.amazon.com/The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering




INTRODUCTION

This book is both an anatomy and an indictment of the Holocaust industry. In the pages that follow, I will argue that “The Holocaust” is an ideological representation of the Nazi holocaust.1 Like most ideologies, it bears a connection, if tenuous, with reality. The Holocaust is not an arbitrary but rather an internally coherent construct. Its central dogmas sustain significant political and class interests. Indeed, The Holocaust has proven to be an indispensable ideological weapon. Through its deployment, one of the world’s most formidable military powers, with a horrendous human rights record, has cast itself as a “victim” state, and the most successful ethnic group in the United States has likewise acquired victim status. Considerable dividends accrue from this specious victimhood – in particular, immunity to criticism, however justified. Those enjoying this immunity, I might add, have not escaped the moral corruptions that typically attend it. From this perspective, Elie Wiesel’s performance as official interpreter of The Holocaust is not happenstance. Plainly he did not come to this position on account of his humanitarian commitments or literary talents.2 Rather, Wiesel plays this leading role because he unerringly articulates the dogmas of, and accordingly sustains the interests underpinning, The Holocaust.

The initial stimulus for this book was Peter Novick’s seminal study, The Holocaust in American Life, which I reviewed for a British literary journal.3 In these pages the critical dialogue I entered in with Novick is broadened; hence, the extensive number of references to his study. More a congeries of provocative aperçus than a sustained critique, The Holocaust in American Life belongs to the venerable American tradition of muckraking. Yet like most muckrakers, Novick focuses only on the most egregious abuses. Scathing and refreshing as it often is, The Holocaust in American Life is not a radical critique. Root assumptions go unchallenged. Neither banal nor heretical, the book is pitched to the controversial extreme of the mainstream spectrum. Predictably, it received many, though mixed, notices in the American media.

Novick’s central analytical category is “memory.” Currently all the rage in the ivory tower, “memory” is surely the most impoverished concept to come down the academic pike in a long time. With the obligatory nod to Maurice Halbwachs, Novick aims to demonstrate how “current concerns” shape “Holocaust memory.” Once upon a time, dissenting intellectuals deployed robust political categories such as “power” and “interests,” on the one hand, and “ideology,” on the other. Today, all that remains is the bland, depoliticized language of “concerns” and “memory.” Yet given the evidence Novick adduces, Holocaust memory is an ideological construct of vested interests. Although chosen, Holocaust memory, according to Novick, is “more often than not” arbitrary. The choice, he argues, is made not from “calculation of advantages and disadvantages” but rather “without much thought for . . . consequences.”4 The evidence suggests the opposite conclusion.

My original interest in the Nazi holocaust was personal. Both my father and mother were survivors of the Warsaw Ghetto and the Nazi concentration camps. Apart from my parents, every family member on both sides was exterminated by the Nazis. My earliest memory, so to speak, of the Nazi holocaust is my mother glued in front of the television watching the trial of Adolf Eichmann (1961) when I came home from school. Although they had been liberated from the camps only sixteen years before the trial, an unbridgeable abyss always separated, in my mind, the parents I knew from that. Photographs of my mother’s family hung on the living-room wall. (None from my father’s family survived the war.) I could never quite make sense of my connection with them, let alone conceive what happened. They were my mother’s sisters, brother and parents, not my aunts, uncle or grandparents. I remember reading as a child John Hersey’s The Wall and Leon Uris’s Mila 18, both fictionalized accounts of the Warsaw Ghetto. (I still recall my mother complaining that, engrossed in The Wall, she missed her subway stop on the way to work.) Try as I did, I couldn’t even for a moment make the imaginative leap that would join my parents, in all their ordinariness, with that past. Frankly, I still can’t.

The more important point, however, is this. Apart from this phantom presence, I do not remember the Nazi holocaust ever intruding on my childhood. The main reason was that no one outside my family seemed to care about what had happened. My childhood circle of friends read widely, and passionately debated the events of the day. Yet I honestly do not recall a single friend (or parent of a friend) asking a single question about what my mother and father endured. This was not a respectful silence. It was simply indifference. In this light, one cannot but be skeptical of the outpourings of anguish in later decades, after the Holocaust industry was firmly established.

I sometimes think that American Jewry “discovering” the Nazi holocaust was worse than its having been forgotten. True, my parents brooded in private; the suffering they endured was not publicly validated. But wasn’t that better than the current crass exploitation of Jewish martyrdom? Before the Nazi holocaust became The Holocaust, only a few scholarly studies such as Raul Hilberg’s The Destruction of the European Jews and memoirs such as Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning and Ella Lingens-Reiner’s Prisoners of Fear were published on the subject.5 But this small collection of gems is better than the shelves upon shelves of shlock that now line libraries and bookstores.

Both my parents, although daily reliving that past until the day each died, lost interest by the end of their lives in The Holocaust as a public spectacle. One of my father’s lifelong friends was a former inmate with him in Auschwitz, a seemingly incorruptible left-wing idealist who on principle refused German compensation after the war. Eventually he became a director of the Israeli Holocaust museum, Yad Vashem. Reluctantly and with genuine disappointment, my father finally admitted that even this man had been corrupted by the Holocaust industry, tailoring his beliefs for power and profit. As the rendering of The Holocaust assumed ever more absurd forms, my mother liked to quote (with intentional irony) Henry Ford: “History is bunk.” The tales of “Holocaust survivors” – all concentration camp inmates, all heroes of the resistance – were a special source of wry amusement in my home. Long ago John Stuart Mill recognized that truths not subject to continual challenge eventually “cease to have the effect of truth by being exaggerated into falsehood.”

My parents often wondered why I would grow so indignant at the falsification and exploitation of the Nazi genocide. The most obvious answer is that it has been used to justify criminal policies of the Israeli state and US support for these policies. There is a personal motive as well. I do care about the memory of my family’s persecution. The current campaign of the Holocaust industry to extort money from Europe in the name of “needy Holocaust victims” has shrunk the moral stature of their martyrdom to that of a Monte Carlo casino. Even apart from these concerns, however, I remain convinced that it is important to preserve – to fight for – the integrity of the historical record. In the final pages of this book I will suggest that in studying the Nazi holocaust we can learn much not just about “the Germans” or “the Gentiles” but about all of us. Yet I think that to do so, to truly learn from the Nazi holocaust, its physical dimension must be reduced and its moral dimension expanded. Too many public and private resources have been invested in memorializing the Nazi genocide. Most of the output is worthless, a tribute not to Jewish suffering but to Jewish aggrandizement. The time is long past to open our hearts to the rest of humanity’s sufferings. This was the main lesson my mother imparted. I never once heard her say: Do not compare. My mother always compared. No doubt historical distinctions must be made. But to make out moral distinctions between “our” suffering and “theirs” is itself a moral travesty.“You can’t compare any two miserable people,” Plato humanely observed, “and say that one is happier than the other.” In the face of the sufferings of African-Americans, Vietnamese and Palestinians, my mother’s credo always was: We are all holocaust victims.

Norman G. Finkelstein

April 2000
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Saturday, June 24, 2017 7:02:22 AM

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Hope123 wrote:
Since our library has all kinds of displays recognizing different groups, or different current topics, or seasonal topics, all recommending many books, I find nothing strange about recognizing diversity and even recognizing the diversity pertinent to that area. They are just offering what they think will be of interest to many of those who live there. However, our libraries do change them up and have variety. Perhaps this will not be a permanent display of recommended books.

According to the original message "there is now a sort of grotto, with murals on the walls". Looks like it's pretty permanent.

I understand it when every other day I have to read about this lady on ca.yahoo.com:

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/kim-kardashian-kanye-west-hire-surrogate-carry-third-child-125331478.html

Yahoo is a commercial enterprise and they better now what to do about their own money. But a Public Library is public and should serve the needs of the public not a particular ethnic group.

BTW it looks like Yahoo indeed had misused their money:

http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-yahoo-verizon-20170613-story.html

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, June 25, 2017 9:03:35 PM
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How can I pronounce "Харбин Хэйлунцзян"?






Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, June 26, 2017 1:34:19 AM

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almo 1 wrote:
How can I pronounce "Харбин Хэйлунцзян"?

In Russian it's [harbin heilundzian] - ending in 'ian' it sounds almost like an Armenian name. In English it's Harbin Heilongjiang.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Monday, June 26, 2017 12:26:58 PM
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Like Hope, I was surprised at this topic - and the idea of people being 'offended' by gaining new knowledge is rather difficult to come to grips with.

So I was wondering, (as this seems to be an unusual move then, on the part of the library concerned) - what role libraries are expected to play in community education in the USA?

As this seems to me - and to Hope - as the normal use of a library, I really would like to know the answer.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, June 26, 2017 1:59:39 PM
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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
almo 1 wrote:
How can I pronounce "Харбин Хэйлунцзян"?

In Russian it's [harbin heilundzian] - ending in 'ian' it sounds almost like an Armenian name. In English it's Harbin Heilongjiang.






Thanks.


almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 2:00:58 AM
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Romany, don't you understand? this is about activists and lobbyists:


10:55 Interview with mayor of Glendale City, California
27:40 Interview with mayor of Buena Park City, California


youtube.com/interview




Anyway these days you could get any books from Amazon
except some countries like China you promote.


theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/26/Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo released from Chinese prison with late-stage cancer


The case is very similar to that of Otto Warmbier


North Korea: The tragic fate of American student Otto Warmbier


In addition,

cnn.com/2016/06/16/Missing Hong Kong bookseller: I was kidnapped by Chinese 'special forces'






almo 1
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 9:21:38 PM
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almo 1 wrote:



www.reporternewspapers.net/2017/06/19/Brookhaven park’s neighbors oppose ‘comfort women’ memorial, may sue




Residents living around the Brookhaven park where a controversial “comfort women” memorial is set to be unveiled June 30 are telling the city to find another location or face legal action.










**********************************



Brookhaven City Council Regular Meeting 6/29/2017
City Hall – Peachtree Road Brookhaven, GA

Comfort Women Brookhaven City Council Meeting 6/29/2017







almo 1
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 6:41:53 PM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan

These two articles have disappeared from HuffingtonPost
for some unknown reason. But archived.


http://archive.fo/BCEbp

“By establishing this memorial, we are raising awareness of the ongoing problems of sexual and human trafficking taking place in metro Atlanta and the world today.” These were the words uttered by the mayor of Brookhaven, John Ernst. This comment was made alongside the decision to install in Brookhaven the statue that is the symbol of the Korean women who were sexually assaulted by the former Japanese Army during World War II, which ended over 70 years ago. These Korean women are known as “comfort women.”
At a glance, it seems that Brookhaven is tackling this human rights issue in earnest. However, we cannot ignore the fact there are still a several problems that they must face with great seriousness.
Does this have echoes of the Pink Pony case from earlier this year and ban on strip clubs?

***************************



http://archive.fo/GWETq

Put simply, this is a bad foreign policy move, and could have serious consequences in the international arena.

Perhaps more troubling, the Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force, a Korean advocacy group, actually approached the Brookhaven local government with the idea to establish this controversial statue, and they’ve spearheaded its installation. As State Rep. Tom Taylor (R-Dunwoody) said:
“This is a small group of Korean-American activists pushing this [memorial] all across Georgia and [they] finally got a city to take the bait. This is a political group that basically wants to drive a wedge between Japan and Korea.”
The Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force has been rumored to be affiliated with Pink Pony - a local gentleman’s club that has been allegedly connected to human trafficking rings, and that is frequented by Korean businessmen.
progpen
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 9:43:48 AM

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Romany wrote:

Like Hope, I was surprised at this topic - and the idea of people being 'offended' by gaining new knowledge is rather difficult to come to grips with.

So I was wondering, (as this seems to be an unusual move then, on the part of the library concerned) - what role libraries are expected to play in community education in the USA?

As this seems to me - and to Hope - as the normal use of a library, I really would like to know the answer.


I've seen this ad nauseam just about everywhere I've lived in the US. In my hometown in Iowa, when I was a child a memorial silently disappeared when a wealthy donor to the library didn't like having black people remembered if there were not also going to be white people remembered right along side. There were no black people in our town at that time. When I was in Texas there was a shitstorm over a statue in a public park that talked about the people who died trying to get to the US from Mexico.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 11:47:11 AM

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Give any human being a platform and they'll find something to complain about. Some just are worse than others, are not grateful for what they have and could enjoy, and expect everything in the world to self-centeredly suit them.

A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
Romany
Posted: Sunday, July 09, 2017 3:54:53 PM
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OK - so no-one wants to define what the role of a library is in the community in the USA?

In which case I'll tell you then, how libraries are regarded in other countries in the world.

They're places of learning; they help expand our horizons; they open up new worlds to us. Libraries enable us to bond; they teach us to empathise; they help us educate our children; they give us positive ethical values. The mark of a civilised or cultured society is the number of libraries, museums, theatres it has; and how vigorously they are interacting with the community/public.

I am not making a value judgement; and I don't expect you to agree with me. In fact, I don't see how we COULD agree as our cultures are so different.

But can you see now why the OP sounded so very strange? That's why I asked what role you see libraries performing within the community.

And yes, actually, our libraries can choose for themselves what kinds of displays etc.They are after all, mature professionals. They're adults. They know their job better than we do. Why would they suddenly turn rogue and start encouraging sedition?d'oh!

They're Librarians, for goodnessake.Dancing
progpen
Posted: Sunday, July 09, 2017 4:28:01 PM

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Romany. I agree with your definition, I grew up in a Carnegie public library and the proudest day of my young life was when I was old enough to go upstairs to the grown up portion of the library and check out books there. Flash forward several decades and public libraries are a shadow of what they once were. In wealthy neighborhoods, they are still great institutions for learning, but just about everywhere else they have either disappeared or they have been downgraded to a part-time (sometimes only three days a week) service.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Romany
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 9:24:21 AM
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Progpen - So you, at least, know what I mean. Actually I remember reading a piece in a Stephen King book which was all about how joining the library as a kid was the most wonderful thing the character had done ...for all the reasons listed above.

We've also gone through a bit of stress in UK in relation to the Arts - and the way funding keeps getting whittled away. A lot of our village libraries too have closed.

But what IS wonderful is how all these beleaguered institutions have re-invented themselves. The adaptation of technology into the Arts has led to amazing community events, imaginative community projects, displays which would not have been possible before the Internet, and country-wide scholastic competitions, internships, clubs and organisations.

Despite shrinking Govt. funding, it's an absolutely fabulous time in history to be working in the Arts.

(Yesterday our museum, which depends on Grants and charity organisations, functioned as an Art Gallery in a city-wide Art Fair; turned half our bottom floor into a pop-up tea room; and also manned a stall in the park - things that we would never have been able to take on without the technology that underpinned the whole project. It was exhausting, but such fun - and I took scads of children around and introduced them to their heritage. Fabulous day!)
almo 1
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 9:54:04 AM
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You don't understand that this thread is not about
the library thing like Stephen King describes in "The Library Policeman".

This is about propagandists and activists and lobbyists.






almo 1
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 10:00:17 PM
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Joined: 10/16/2016
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan

The propaganda campaign failed in Freiburg,Germany.



http://www.dw.com/de/freiburg-und-die-trostfrau/



Als ihm vor wenigen Wochen der Bürgermeister von Suwon - der neuen Freiburger Partnerstadt in Südkorea - am Telefon vorschlug, eine sogenannte "Trostfrauen-Statue" in seiner Stadt aufzustellen, da sagte der Freiburger Oberbürgermeister Dieter Salomon spontan "Ja".

Es wäre die erste derartige Statue in Europa. In den USA, in Kanada und Australien stehen schon welche, und natürlich in Südkorea. Auf einer Delegationsreise nach Suwon hatte der Grünen-Politiker in einem städtischen Park selbst ein solches Denkmal gesehen. "Der Anblick hat mich berührt", sagt er.

>>>>>>>>>>>>

Hätte man ihm vor ein paar Wochen gesagt, was für ein "Erdbeben" er mit seiner Entscheidung auslösen würde, er hätte es nicht geglaubt, sagt Salomon rückblickend. Heute sei er "in vielerlei Hinsicht schlauer". Für ihn geht es jetzt darum, den Schaden möglichst gering zu halten und die ganze Angelegenheit einigermaßen unbeschadet zu einem Abschluss zu bringen. Tagelang liefen deshalb intensive Beratungen mit sämtlichen Beteiligten.
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