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in/at Jennifer's house/home. Options
sb70012
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 12:09:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/6/2013
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Hi,
I know the difference between "home" and "house". I don't want you to explain their differences.
I just want you to tell me which one of the following is correct. If all of them are correct to you, then which ones are more common?

Mom: Alex, where are you now?
Alex: Hi Mom, I'm at Jennifer's house.
Alex: Hi Mom, I'm in Jennifer's home.
Alex: Hi Mom, I'm at Jennifer's home.
Alex: Hi Mom, I'm in Jennifer's house.

Which ones are correct and which ones are wrong? Which one are more common?

Thank you.

Sorry if I don't thank you more than once. I don't want to bother you by filling up a thread with multiple thank yous.
NKM
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 12:29:14 PM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 3,640
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
The only one that sounds natural to me (American English) is "Hi Mom, I'm at Jennifer's house."

But, truth be told, I'd expect it to be just "I'm at Jennifer's."

sb70012
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 12:36:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/6/2013
Posts: 1,004
Neurons: 4,809
But why in other circumstances "in the home" "at the home" "in the house" are OK but when "Jennifer's" is used only "at the house" is used.Think

Sorry if I don't thank you more than once. I don't want to bother you by filling up a thread with multiple thank yous.
NKM
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 4:58:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 3,640
Neurons: 150,642
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Mom only asked about your present location, so "at Jennifer's" is what she needs to know.

If Jennifer owns (or rents) a camp or shop as well as a house, you might want to be more specific: "I'm at Jennifer's house (or camp or shop)." But even then, by default "at Jennifer's" would be taken to mean "at Jennifer's house" unless there's some reason to assume otherwise.

"Other circumstances" might call for more detail or explanation: "I'm at the home of Jennifer's cousin Jane, on Maple Street" or "I'm standing in Jennifer's kitchen." But the answer to a simple question shouldn't be more complicated than necessary.

"At" is usually the appropriate preposition for giving a location, and "house" seems less formal (and more common) than "home" for such purposes.



Note that I speak American English. Prepositions may be used differently in other dialects.

Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 3:49:27 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

As NK says, a native-speaker simply wouldn't use "at....'s house". Remember always to keep in mind that in conversation, we don't try to impress each other with our speech - we just give the shortest response possible. Some people wouldn't even use 'at'. If asked where they are they just say "Jennies" or "Doug's" or whatever.

But normally it's "I'm at Jennies", "I'm going over to Peter's", "After the movie I might go to Michael's". If we were going to use a noun after the person's name it's usually "place" - "If you want me I'll be at Mark and Alice's place." "I'm going over to see Anne's new place", "We'll all get together at Emma's place before we leave." etc.
British English.

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