The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

CPE - grammatical structures Options
dave freak
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 4:01:36 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,616
Neurons: 6,556
6. I'd rather you paid more attention.
ONLY

If only you paid more attention!

7. Digging in the garden allows me to vent my frustrations.
OUTLET
Digging in the garden is the outlet of/for my frustrations.

8. The first sign of the disease is the blurred vision.
ONSET

The blurred vision is the onset of the disease.
The onset of the disease is the blurred vision.

9. They used the chemical in several new applications.
EXTENDED

The chemical was extended in/to several new applications.

10. I must cut down on fats.
OPTION

No idea now.

I'd like to thank everyone in advance for bothering to help me. Thank you!!
thar
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 4:51:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,648
Neurons: 62,505
dave freak wrote:
6. I'd rather you paid more attention.
ONLY
If only you paid more attention!

Yes, the construction is correct.
The meanings are a bit different.
The first is a request, the second is a resigned moan.


7. Digging in the garden allows me to vent my frustrations.
OUTLET
Digging in the garden is the outlet of/for my frustrations.

Yes
Or, to be more accurate, it gives me an outlet for my frustrations. (It says 'allows me to vent', not 'vents'.
It is 'for' - like a pipe which is used for letting out your frustrations.

8. The first sign of the disease is the blurred vision.
ONSET

The blurred vision is the onset of the disease.
The onset of the disease is the blurred vision.


It isn't the onset - that is the time,the event. It is a sign of onset of the disease, or it signals the onset of the disease.


9. They used the chemical in several new applications.
EXTENDED

The chemical was extended in/to several new applications.

They didn't extend the chemical (unless it was rubber!Whistle )
The use of the chemical was extended to...
They extended the use of the chemical to....
(That is where the use of it reached. It was extended from ....to.....)


10. I must cut down on fats.
OPTION

No idea now.

I must do something.
So what options do you have? Do you have any option? Or only one option?
You could put this either way


I'd like to thank everyone in advance for bothering to help me. Thank you!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 5:57:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Four years this thread's been going!

I'm not going to suggest any 'solutions' till you've had a chance to look at thar's comments (which are all good).

I just wanted to say that the instructions for these exercises are very good - the specification "as similar as possible in meaning to the original sentence" is perfect - if you are expected to change the wording, it is unreasonable to expect you you to get exactly the same meaning.

******
I just noticed that thar did not answer the first few ("Yonks"! I haven't heard that in . . . yonks.)

The first one is fine - any of those.

2. It's an idiom you're missing.
He's always the life and soul of the party.

3. I prefer the first (except for the typo).
There's a high probability it'll rain.

4. The whole sentence has to be turned around - I don't think you can use 'without' when the subject is 'film'.
Natalie Wood died without finishing her last film.

5. Yeah. I like the first one most
She's not a person you can depend on.
or even
She's not a person to depend on.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
dave freak
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 6:56:30 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,616
Neurons: 6,556
Thanks Dragon and thar! You are my personal tutors! If I had the opportunity to thank you both in person, I'd definitely do that.

10. I must cut down on fats.
OPTION

I must do something.

Quote:
So what options do you have? Do you have any option? Or only one option?
You could put this either way
Thar

I have no option but to cut down on fats?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 8:04:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
dave freak wrote:
I have no option but to cut down on fats?

I have no option but to say yes!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
dave freak
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 4:15:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,616
Neurons: 6,556
That's great Drago!

Now I've got to do another activity. This time, however, the beginning of the sentence is given beforehand; I'm supposed to finish it in such a way that it's as close in meaning as possible to the original. My words on red.

1. I have only had to remind Joanna of her promise one.

On only _____________________________________________.

They expect to use stylistic inversion here. Nothing crosses my mind now.

2. I'm beginning to recall now; you did give me money.

Come to think of it; you did give me money.

3. Is it the first performance of the play?

Is this the first time the performance has been put in/delivered/given?

4. Sentries aren't allowed to leave their posts at any time.

At no time are sentries allowed to leave their posts.

5. Margaret didn't look after her teeth and now she's got false ones.

If Margaret had looked after her teeth, she wouldn't have false ones now.

6. "Please, please, let me come with you," Kate said to her grandmother.

Kate pleaded with her grandmother to come with her.

7. Meeting Agnes had affected me profoundly, it changed my whole life.

Meeting Agnes had such a great impact on me that it/I changed my life.


Thank you!
thar
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 4:38:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,648
Neurons: 62,505
Umm now I am confused. Where did this come from.. Anxious

dave freak wrote:
Good afternoon! I've done another grammar exercise that I would like you to check out. Could you, please?Pray Why am I doing so many paraphrasing exercises? Because I would like to make as many sentences out of the original one as possible. I usually pick one aspect of grammar and practise it until I have understood it. Isn't that strategy good?

I think so. Just remember revisiting things is good for memory retention.

For each of the sentences below write a new sentence as similar as possible in meaning to the original sentence, but using the word given. This word must not be altered in any way.

1. My boss says I can use his yacht whenever I want to.
DISPOSAL

My boss says (that) his yacht is at my disposal. (until he's back)

Yes
And
He put his yacht at my disposal.


2. The news was a shock to us.
ABACK
Yes

We were taken aback by the news.

3. Joe realised that he could never be an architect.
CUT

3.1 Joe realised that he couldn't ever cut out to be an architect.
3.2 Joe realised that he could never cut out to be an architect.
3.3 Joe realised that he could never cut out for being an architect.
As Leon says
Standard
He realised he wasn't cut out to be an architect (he did not possess the required personal attributes)
Colloquial
Not the same meaning as the OP
He realised he would never cut it as an architect (he would fail at the job).

4. They chose not to drive because they thought there would be too much snow.
FEAR

They chose not to drive for fear that there would be too much snow.
Hmm. You fear something happening.
The reason was too much snow. But the effect would be getting stuck.
He chose not to drive for fear of getting stuck in the snow.


5. I'm sick of that programme; I've watched it too often.
OFF
This one is the same idiom as was discussed in the event thread....

(My mind went blank here - I will get back to this later)Think

6. I have never have enough time.
SHORT

I am always short of time.


7. He couldn't get the car to start any way.
MATTER

7.1 No matter how hard he tried, he couldn't get the car to start.
'any way' implies a range of approaches. Trying different ways. Not just effort.
He couldn't get it to start no matter what he tried.
Off-topic:

7.2 However hard he tried, he couldn't get the car to start.
And
Hard as he tried, he couldn't...
7.3 Try as he might, he couldn't get the car to start.
Yes
7.4 Although he tried and tried, he couldn't get the (ruddy) car to start.
Applause very restrained!

7.5 Determined as he was, he couldn't make the car start.
A bit clumsy. Determination doesn't start a car
Determined as he was to fix the problem, he couldn't get the car to start.
7.6 He tried to get the car to start but without success.
Yes
7.7 He tried and tried to get the car to start, but the key wouldn't turn.
The key was jammed? That isn't trying to start the car, that is unjamming the ignition
He tried and tried to start the car but the key wouldn't turn.
He tried and tried to get the car to start,, but the engine wouldn't turn over.

Well, why not buy a new car? Think

8. The criminal got away through the back window.
ESCAPE

8.1 The criminal had a narrow escape through the back window.
If he was almost caught. A narrow escape is only just escaping, nearly getting caught.
8.2 The criminal made his escape through the back window.
Yes. Quite literary, or telling the story.

Cheers for any feedback.

David
dave freak
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:08:34 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,616
Neurons: 6,556
Big thanks thar for bothering to get back to that post. You're a star. I'm afraid you've missed the last post, too. ;)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 7:52:14 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
dave freak wrote:
That's great Drago!

Now I've got to do another activity. This time, however, the beginning of the sentence is given beforehand; I'm supposed to finish it in such a way that it's as close in meaning as possible to the original. My words on red.

1. I have only had to remind Joanna of her promise one once.

On only _____________________________________________.

They expect to use stylistic inversion here. Nothing crosses my mind now.
Think On only one occasion have I known you to give up on an exercise!

2. I'm beginning to recall now; you did give me money.

Come to think of it; you did give me money. Applause

3. Is it the first performance of the play?

Is this the first time the performance has been put in/delivered/given?
Not 'performance'. This is the first performance of the play, so it is the first time the play has been put on/performed. I don't like 'delivered' or 'given'.

4. Sentries aren't allowed to leave their posts at any time.

At no time are sentries allowed to leave their posts. Applause

5. Margaret didn't look after her teeth and now she's got false ones.

If Margaret had looked after her teeth, she wouldn't have false ones now. Applause

6. "Please, please, let me come with you," Kate said to her grandmother.

Kate pleaded with her grandmother to come with her.
It seems a bit 'opposite' somehow.
The original has grandmother going somewhere and Margaret wanting to come too.
Your sentence has Margaret going somewhere and wanting grandmother to come too.
The simplest (if that fits the rules of the game) is to keep the quoted words.
Kate pleaded with her grandmother, "Please, please, let me come with you."


7. Meeting Agnes had affected me profoundly, it changed my whole life.

Meeting Agnes had such a great impact on me that it/I changed my life.
Yes - I prefer 'it changed my life'.

Thank you!


Did you think about the other #5?
5. I'm sick of that programme; I've watched it too often.
OFF
This one is the same idiom as was discussed in the event thread....

I'm getting browned off waiting. Whistle

Browned off.


hasta las narices - "It's getting up my nose"?




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
dave freak
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 12:08:13 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,616
Neurons: 6,556
Quote:
5. I'm sick of that programme; I've watched it too often.
OFF


Hi Drago! It slipped my mind!

With the help of a dictionary, I came to think that the following answer may be right:

I've gone off that programme; I've watched it too often.

Additionally:

I've got tired of that programme; I've watched it too often.

That programme began to pall on me; I've watched it too often.

I got bored with that programme; I've watched it too often.


This time I consulted my dictionary, which is impossible during the exam. Brick wall Do you know any other phrase to mean 'lose enthusiasm in something"?

Hope my answers don't piss you off. Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 7:12:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I imagine that the idiom they were looking for was 'gone off' - for some reason, I didn't think of that one!

The other ideas you had are all good (but don't use 'OFF').

"Browned off" may be a bit 'dated'.
"Pissed off" is not likely in an exam.

fed up, tired, hacked off (U.S. slang),
wearied, weary, pissed off (taboo slang),
uninterested, sick and tired (informal), listless, browned-off (informal),
brassed off (Brit. slang), ennuied

I think 'brassed off' is either local (some specific dialect) or so old that even I don't know it. I think I've seen it in a novel once.
When I look it up, the examples are all about a film about Northern English brass band music - "1945: Pete Postlethwaite, 59, British actor, whose films include Brassed Off"

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
dave freak
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 4:31:38 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,616
Neurons: 6,556
I'm not 100% sure they expected me to use the phrasal "go off"; I just must look it up in the answer key. Thank you very much for the synonyms, Drago!

thar Your explanations are much clearer than those found in my coursebook.

Applause
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.