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conversely & inversely Options
ipipip
Posted: Tuesday, December 31, 2013 5:01:50 PM
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Joined: 4/14/2013
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conversely & inversely


What is the difference between them?

Thanks
ipipip
Posted: Tuesday, December 31, 2013 5:16:41 PM
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Joined: 4/14/2013
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Conversely, renewable power could be cheaper if it were produced on a larger scale.

Could I say "Inversely, renewable power could be cheaper if it were produced on a larger scale."?
ipipip
Posted: Tuesday, December 31, 2013 5:21:26 PM
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Joined: 4/14/2013
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Please tell me how to make use of a dictionary to distinguish those whose meaning is very similar.

Where can I find more example sentences to compare them and to help to make sense of their difference?
thar
Posted: Wednesday, January 01, 2014 12:24:55 PM

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conversely means 'against' - an opposing argument.
con= against

eg
I am happy to be here because it is home. Conversely, I also want to leave because I want to travel and see other places.

The X party support higher taxes. Conversely, the Y party thinks lower taxes should be introduced.

You are stating two contradictory or opposing points.

The inverse of something is the same idea turned around - upside down, opposite.

You don't normally say 'inversely', so I won't put it in a sentence because I cannot think of something very natural.

But you do use 'the inverse'
eg
By raising taxes, X party achieved the inverse of what they intended, and the economy collapsed.

As to how to see meanings in action - if you input it as a search term in an internet search, and then be very selective in chosing only respectable sources, you will get the usage. Eg put in the word and the name of a respectable English language newspaper, you should get something of how they use it. Although others here will be able to give far better advice about that.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, January 01, 2014 12:44:03 PM

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I think the only occasion for using 'inversely' is when someone describes something as 'inversely proportional'.

That simply means that as one thing grows larger, another gets smaller in the same amount.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 01, 2014 6:30:31 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi ipipip.

Your original question has been well answered (you do not use 'inversely' in that sort of sentence).

In general, the OALD gives examples which show the difference between conversely and inversely - but it does not explain the difference.

They are both adverbs, but:
conversely is used to show the opposite of a statement or idea - it is used to modify a whole clause. It is often separated by commas.

The taxes could be increased. Conversely, the taxes could be reduced.
(Conversely relates to the whole idea 'taxes could be increased')

inversely is used to modify adjectives (or participles acting like adjectives.)

The amount of government income is inversely related to the rate of taxes. The higher the rate of taxes, the less money the government gets.
(Inversely relates to the participle/adjective 'related')
As FounDit says - there are very few uses of this, and they seem to be very similar - 'related', 'proportional'. I think I have heard 'inversely comparable' - but that just seems like a bad synonym for 'inversely proportional'.

********************
I can see the problem.

I am guessing that if you look in a translating dictionary, one word in your own language may give 'inversely' and 'conversely' as possible English words.

I can't advise the use of one particular dictionary.
Several of them have 'usage note', which help, but you have to find the dictionary with a usage note for the particular word you want. You may have to look in several dictionaries.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Norman Stone
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 11:34:29 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/12/2017
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
"If the sun is not shining, it is cloudy."
Inverse: "If the sun is shining, it is not cloudy."
Converse: "If it is cloudy, the sun is not shining."
Contrapositive: "If it is not cloudy, the sun is shining."

That is it.
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