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Analyzis of Arguments Options
You know who I am
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 6:59:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 597
Neurons: 4,702
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Hey, fellows!

I have been studying Arguments and Predicates over these days, and a question arose:

So far, I have gathered 3 different types of Verbal Arguments (Subject Argument, Object Argument and Prepositional Arguments);
Are there other types of arguments? If so, what are?



I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 9:39:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

You have lost me here.

I know several meanings of "argument":

argument n
1. a quarrel; altercation
2. a discussion in which reasons are put forward in support of and against a proposition, proposal, or case; debate: the argument on birth control will never be concluded.
3. (sometimes plural) a point or series of reasons presented to support or oppose a proposition

Collins English Dictionary

Plus a couple of technical definitions (in logic and physics)

It is usually used to mean a quarrel - not a debate. An argument tends to be angry.

A verbal argument is a situation in which people shout their disagreement at each other.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
You know who I am
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 10:41:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 597
Neurons: 4,702
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

You have lost me here.

I know several meanings of "argument":

argument n
1. a quarrel; altercation
2. a discussion in which reasons are put forward in support of and against a proposition, proposal, or case; debate: the argument on birth control will never be concluded.
3. (sometimes plural) a point or series of reasons presented to support or oppose a proposition

Collins English Dictionary

Plus a couple of technical definitions (in logic and physics)

It is usually used to mean a quarrel - not a debate. An argument tends to be angry.

A verbal argument is a situation in which people shout their disagreement at each other.


Hey Drag! It's been a while, hasn't it?

This argument you are talking about is the noun, but I'm asking regarding something else:

Argument, in Linguistic, is a necessary element that helps complete the meaning of the Predicate (Main Verb), for example:

I like John

"I" is the Subject Argument of the Predicate Like
"John" is the Obect Argument of the Predicate Like

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 11:07:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Oh - It's another of those instances in which linguists have decided to use an existing word to mean something totally different from its normal uses!

I like John

In grammar (not linguistics)

"I" is the Subject of the sentence
"John" is the Subject Complement
"Like" is the verb
"Like John" is the predicate


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 11:20:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,686
Neurons: 144,513
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Subjects are always nouns.
They may be single words or phrases or clauses.
I like John. - "I" is the subject.
The man hit the ball. - "The man" (noun phrase) is the subject.
That I lived in Manchester is well-known. - "That I lived in Manchester" (clause) is the subject.

Complements can be all sorts of things.

They can be nouns (in which case they are usually an object)
I like John. - "John" is the object of the verb, and the complement of the sentence. Normally, the word 'object' is used when the verb is transitive and 'complement' is used when the verb is a copula.
He is John - "John" is the complement.

The complement can be an adjective, phrase, clause:

Grass is green.
He is a big argumentative bully.
He is as big as me.
The question is "Who shot the sheriff?"

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
You know who I am
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 4:21:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 597
Neurons: 4,702
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Subjects are always nouns.
They may be single words or phrases or clauses.
I like John. - "I" is the subject.
The man hit the ball. - "The man" (noun phrase) is the subject.
That I lived in Manchester is well-known. - "That I lived in Manchester" (clause) is the subject.

Complements can be all sorts of things.

They can be nouns (in which case they are usually an object)
I like John. - "John" is the object of the verb, and the complement of the sentence. Normally, the word 'object' is used when the verb is transitive and 'complement' is used when the verb is a copula.
He is John - "John" is the complement.

The complement can be an adjective, phrase, clause:

Grass is green.
He is a big argumentative bully.
He is as big as me.
The question is "Who shot the sheriff?"


These complements are called predicate adjectival and nominal, they have a similar relationship with arguments.
But I think I have already found an answer, thank you, Drag.

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
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