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Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 11:48:29 PM

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Before we begin a project, we would usually have a kick-off meeting to get everyone acquainted with the project and each other.

Recently I came across this sentence in an email: "kick-off meeting and introductory session". I wonder if 'introductory' here is correct. I assume the person was referring to a session where everyone involved would get to know each other. Then shouldn't this be 'introduction session'?

My understanding is that introductory means initial, in the beginning. Introductory price = price for a new product a company is introducing to the market. Introductory class = those 101 courses.

Furthermore, does 'introduction session' the term used by native speakers? If no, what is?

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 1:32:13 AM

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Priscilla86 wrote:
Before we begin a project, we would usually have a kick-off meeting to get everyone acquainted with the project and each other.

Recently I came across this sentence in an email: "kick-off meeting and introductory session". I wonder if 'introductory' here is correct. I assume the person was referring to a session where everyone involved would get to know each other. Then shouldn't this be 'introduction session'?

My understanding is that introductory means initial, in the beginning. Introductory price = price for a new product a company is introducing to the market. Introductory class = those 101 courses.

Furthermore, does 'introduction session' the term used by native speakers? If no, what is?


The word "introductory" is correct for most of the contexts you have introduced. Because the word "introduction" is itself a noun, there would need to be a good reason to use it attributively, that is to say as if it were an adjective. The word "introductory" already satisfies the need for an attributive word for this concept, so the phrase "introduction session" sounds rather odd to this native speaker of English.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
mactoria
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 1:36:48 AM
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Priscilla: I'll let others take on the correctness of "introductory session," but as an American speaker of English, I can verify that we'd more than likely use the term "introductory session" in this context, just as email stated. I don't know what the writer of your email was referring to in "kick-off meeting and introductory session," but in my experience, "introductory session" would typically refer to the initial session. You might well say then that the two terms are redundant, "kick-off" and "introductory" meaning about the same thing; perhaps. Still, we'd say "introductory session" with or without "kick-off meeting."
Priscilla86
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 2:44:43 AM

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Location: Lavender, Singapore
Thank you, leon and mactoria.

Because the email made a separate distinction between the kick-off meeting and the introductory session, I right away assumed that the writer was referring to the casual cocktail session after the meeting where everybody gets to know everybody else. I got the feeling that the writer took the act of introducing oneself to one another (as one wont to do in a cocktail session) literally and call such sessions 'introductory', which I don't think is the right meaning for that word Think

I am okay with calling the whole thing (meeting + cocktail session) an 'introductory session,' though.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Hope123
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 5:00:36 AM

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Priscilla, it is rather ambiguous the way it is written as to whether or not it is one session or two without further context.

We would have said introductory just as Mactoria and Leon would. But if we meant a cocktail session to introduce each other as well, we'd have said, "and (later) a get-acquainted (cocktail) session at...

I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can.
Priscilla86
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 7:02:08 AM

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Thanks for the input, Hope! Yeah, I reckon it was something like that - a get-acquainted session - but probably it felt too casual for the sender so she changed it to 'Introductory' in order to sound more business-like.

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 7:44:42 AM

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I'm a bit late on this one, but I agree with the others that, in general, 'introductory' would be heard.

However, it doesn't mean "getting to know each other", it means "getting to know the subject".

An introductory lesson (on a course) is the first one, at which you are introduced to what the course is about. It is not where you are introduced to the other students.

"Kick-off meeting" sounds to me like an informal "introductory session".

Personally, to say what you explained, I would say ". . . an introductory meeting and cocktail party".

I've never been to a cocktail party - don't the cocks object? Whistle Whistle
I suppose it's a mixed-gender version of 'hen party' (the masculine version is 'stag night').


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Priscilla86
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 5:29:54 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:


However, it doesn't mean "getting to know each other", it means "getting to know the subject".

An introductory lesson (on a course) is the first one, at which you are introduced to what the course is about. It is not where you are introduced to the other students.



This is my understanding, too. I suppose in AmE some call these get-acquainted or get-to-know-each-other parties 'a mixer'.


Drag0nspeaker wrote:


I suppose it's a mixed-gender version of 'hen party' (the masculine version is 'stag night').


Not sure if the 'kidding' emoticon extends to your last sentence as well, but hen parties and stag nights are the British-equivalent of bachelorette and bachelor parties, are they not? That they are wedding-related? So 'cocktail parties' are not really the mixed-gender version of them, then? Think

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Romany
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 9:36:21 AM
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Seems Drago's not around so I'll put your mind at rest, 'Cilla: yes, Drago's joking. More accurately he is 'playing' with English which is something most Brits do just about from the cradle onwards! It's in our DNA, I think.

Yep, Hen and Stag nights are what you think they are. If you were to come to Brighton on any weekend you'd see parties of men (the one dressed as a giant penis is always the groom!) and women (dressed as fairies or burlesque stars) screeching round the streets, or riding our bicycle-powered moving bars. We only realised last year our city is now being touted across the UK as THE place for Stag or Hen parties.

We are not amused.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 1:11:55 PM
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Romany wrote:

Seems Drago's not around so I'll put your mind at rest, 'Cilla: yes, Drago's joking. More accurately he is 'playing' with English which is something most Brits do just about from the cradle onwards! It's in our DNA, I think.

Yep, Hen and Stag nights are what you think they are. If you were to come to Brighton on any weekend you'd see parties of men (the one dressed as a giant penis is always the groom!) and women (dressed as fairies or burlesque stars) screeching round the streets, or riding our bicycle-powered moving bars. We only realised last year our city is now being touted across the UK as THE place for Stag or Hen parties.

We are not amused.


When I was younger it was traditional to get the groom drunk and tie him to a lamppost naked or similar, dressing him like a penis would make that more difficult.Whistle


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Priscilla86
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 11:01:21 PM

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Joined: 5/28/2014
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Location: Lavender, Singapore
Romany wrote:


If you were to come to Brighton on any weekend you'd see parties of men (the one dressed as a giant penis is always the groom!) and women (dressed as fairies or burlesque stars) screeching round the streets, or riding our bicycle-powered moving bars. We only realised last year our city is now being touted across the UK as THE place for Stag or Hen parties.


Brighton sounds like a hoot and a half! One of these days, Ro...I swear I'll go there.

Sarriesfan wrote:


When I was younger it was traditional to get the groom drunk and tie him to a lamppost naked or similar.


Have always wondered about such pranks, does any of the groomsmen keep watch? At what point will you untie him? And I suppose you'd do this only in the summer? Because if it's winter it's just cruel - and irresponsibly dangerous.

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
TMe
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 10:32:49 AM

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Didn't I tell you that, DragO the Scot, is a jovial prankster?

Rom has confirmed it. Thanks Romany.

I am a layman.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:42:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
TMe wrote:
Didn't I tell you that, DragO the Scot, is a jovial prankster?
Rom has confirmed it. Thanks Romany.

Me? Angel

I thought about having a 'username' of Loki, Anansi or maybe Puck - then thought of Reynardine, an English version of the old European trickster-myth, Reynard the Fox.

But 'Drag0nspeaker' won out . . .

It comes from another myth/legend that dragons were incapable of telling lies - but had become very skilled in the art of tricking people by telling them the truth.

I try to remember to use the Whistle image whenever I joke.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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