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Which everyday English words came from Arabic? Options
Yarin
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 8:08:05 PM
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tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 4:01:23 AM

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Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 6:59:29 AM

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I also know of 'Kohl' (not the German name) - it's use is now mainly historical (it was used a lot in Egypt)

kohl n.
a dark powder, as finely powdered antimony sulfide, used as an eyeliner or eyeshadow.
[1790–1800; < Arabic]

I think that the etymology is similar to that of 'alcohol', as they were distilled in similar ways during part of the process.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 7:51:32 AM
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Yeah - there are hundreds of Arabic words in English as I expect most people know. But it's a great idea to ask for the 'every day' words we use, because I think people expect them all to be specialist words, not those as common and mundane as "jar", "mattress", "cheque" and "check mate" in 'chess", "cork", "fellow", "mask" "orange"......the more one looks about one the more one finds.

Most of these words came into the language in what previous generations called the "Dark Ages" - between 400CE and !066CE - which meant that when the whole English language went 'underground' during the century or so after the Normal invasion, these words survived because they were already in the English language.

PS Drago...you're such a ..man! Kohl "mainly historical"? Away wi'ye!

Pop into Boots, read price lists outside spas or "beauty" salons etc., - kohl is used as much, and by more women per capita than ever it was in its hey-day in Egypt!!

Even though it comes in pencil form these days, it is still the major eye-liner used by women, and some men, all over the world.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 8:31:27 AM

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Quote:
Pop into Boots, read price lists outside spas or "beauty" salons etc., - kohl is used as much, and by more women per capita than ever it was in its hey-day in Egypt!!


WOW! Really?

I suffered (literally suffered) Antimony poisoning when I was a teenager - two weeks of it from one day of papering a wall with wallpaper which had an antimony-based 'gold ink'.

Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
coag
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 2:29:47 PM

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In my mother tongue (Croatian-Serbian) "arsenal" is mostly used for a collection of weapons. It is used figuratively, too, for a group of things available to use, but we do not use "arsenal" for a place where weapons are made.

All my life I wondered what the football club Arsenal had to do with a collection of weapons. It's only recently that I checked the Internet and found that the club got the name from a munitions factory, the Royal Arsenal. And "arsenal" comes from Arabic for "workshop".

It was interesting and funny to learn that the name of the famous English football club has the Arabic origin.

Life is unpredictable.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 3:01:08 PM
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Drago -

I've no doubt that the toxicity thing got sorted before it went onto the commercial market though - otherwise we'd all be walking round with rotting eyelids by now!

And I should imagine that only a very small amount of kohl itself is in the product. (But it certainly works much better than eyeliner pencils).
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 5:37:57 PM

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Hi Romany!

I guess so. There are no 'antidotes' for heavy-metal poisoning, but it does depend on how much, and over how long.

A small amount every day or two must be OK - maybe some Goths have a few eye and skin problems from it!



One surprising one there is 'admiral' - from 'amir-al' ('Emir of' or 'Commander of' the sea) - I'd never looked it up and associated it with 'admire' - sort of like "Reverend" with 'revere'.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 7:35:06 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
One surprising one there is 'admiral' - from 'amir-al' ('Emir of' or 'Commander of' the sea) - I'd never looked it up and associated it with 'admire' - sort of like "Reverend" with 'revere'.

The 'd' in 'admiral' seems to have arisen as a result of confusion with 'admire' or 'admirable'.

Interestingly, the Spanish word for admiral — almirante — includes a different extraneous letter, 'L'. This seems to be due to confusion with the Arabic-derived prefix 'al'.
thar
Posted: Sunday, July 09, 2017 1:05:54 AM

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One that might be confusing is 'lye'.
Everyone knows alkali comes from the Arabic, but nobody seems to be claiming that the older word 'lye' is related to that in any way - that is from Old English læg, leag - to wash.
- the soap made by leaching wood-ash such as burnt bracken roots)
Quote:
*leue-
*leuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to wash."

It forms all or part of: ablution; alluvium; deluge; dilute; elution; lather; latrine; launder; lautitious; lavage; lavation; lavatory; lave; lavish; lotion; lye.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek louein "to wash, bathe;" Latin lavare "to wash," luere "to wash;" Old Irish loathar "basin," Breton laouer "trough;" Old English leaþor "lather," læg "lye."


Unrelated to Arabic al-qily -the burnt ashes of saltwort, from qala "to roast in a pan."
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