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Drawal Options
Roops
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 5:24:32 AM
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Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Hi All,

I have used the word drawal word so many times that, it didn't occur to me that it could be wrong. Now when I search the word in dictionary,it could not be found.

I have used the word 'drawal' in the following ways all these days.

1) Banks will activate alert services about high value payments & drawals on cheques.
2) Utilisation Certificates for previous drawals must be certified.

Is the above usage of the 'drawal' wrong? Please clarify.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 5:30:41 AM

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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Roops wrote:
1) Banks will activate alert services about high value payments & drawals on cheques.
2) Utilisation Certificates for previous drawals must be certified.

Is the above usage of the 'drawal' wrong? Please clarify.


It may be good in Hindi but in English they say withdrawal.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 6:20:41 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

That's right - in English it's called a "withdrawal" - as you've seen in the dictionaries, 'drawal' is not a word in standard English.
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 8:08:06 AM

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland, United States

Think In the spirit of Norma Loquendi (“Consuetudo, jus et norma loquendi” : The right method of speaking and pronouncing is established by custom... ) I would note that your usage of 'drawal' in place of 'withdrawal' is immediately understandable.

That said, you should probably be careful to avoid using 'drawal' in formal settings, choosing to use withdrawal in any business-related, official, scholarly or other formal writing.

Given the number of neologisms and modified locutions (does prepone still confuse anyone?) which have been provided to the wider English using world by speakers and writers of Hinglish and other Indian Englishes, it is possible that 'drawal' might become a recognized and established variation.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 9:34:10 AM

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I've never heard of "prepone". Is that related to cornpone?...Whistle

A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 10:40:27 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
I have never heard of prepone either.

But English is a living language and so will change over time.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 10:48:39 AM

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Yes, prepone, revert, now drawal - all these seem to be Indian English words. (Or a local meaning of 'revert').

Internationally, it would be understood, but looks odd. (But, in fact so odd that it is clear it is a local usage, not a 'mistake'.)
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 10:48:44 AM

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TFD
prepone (priːˈpəʊn)
vb (tr)
Indian to bring forward to an earlier time

A sort of antonym of 'postpone', frequently used in India.

I am a layman.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 1:36:02 PM

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http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst13750_antonym-of-postpone-.aspx


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 3:15:52 PM

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I suppose "prepone" wouldn't have confused me, since I'd have assumed it must be meant as an antonym of "postpone".

But it sure would've made me shake my head and wonder where it came from.

Orson Burleigh
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 4:47:17 PM

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Joined: 10/12/2011
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Location: Annapolis, Maryland, United States
Think Speakers and writers using English have a strong historical tendency to modify and extend borrowed names and portmanteau neologisms (some created from classical languages) in strange and wonderful ways.

Take for instance the recent set of curious new formations which build on misapprehensions regarding the derivation of the word helicopter (a combination of helico = spiraling or rotary and pter = wing or feather)

Helipad - is this a prepared landing site as seen by an inebriated helicopter pilot?Anxious

Quadcopter - possibly a winged device produced by a firm known as Quadco

Hexacopter - this would seem to be an even newer winged device made by Quadco's corporate competitor Hexaco.

There is also the lowly Hamburger, a sandwich made using chopped or ground beef - that is beef which is prepared in a manner ascribed to the inhabitants (burghers) of Hamburg (a port city on the North Sea). Mischievous extensions of the name of this sandwich have produced a myriad of odd 'burgers.

Cheeseburger - Though many burgs are famously associated with cheese, those towns (and regions) are usually associated with specific varieties of cheese.

Bacon Cheeseburger - Bacon Cheeseburg probably has a waiting list of want-to-be inhabitants.

Veggieburger - One might question the mental acuity of Veggieburg's burghers.

Soyburger - A co-worker who originally came from rural Illinois refers to the central part of his home state as 'Soybeania.' Soyburg might well be a small town, possibly an unknown county seat in rural central Illinois' Soybeania region.

Fishburger - Another flavorful sandwich ascribed to the burghers who inhabit some small fishing port.

Sandwiches made of chopped ham, ground pork and even chopped Spam have been offered as hamburgers in some parts of the world - each was, I'm sure, delicious in its own way.Drool
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