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Daemon
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Juneteenth

Although President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, it wasn't until two years later that the word reached the slaves in Texas. General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston on June 19, 1865 with the intention of forcing slave owners to release their slaves, and the day has been celebrated since that time in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and other parts of the Deep South under the nickname "Juneteenth." Observed primarily in African-American communities, Juneteenth festivities usually include parades, picnics, and baseball games. More...
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 7:38:50 AM

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Today's Holiday
Juneteenth
Although President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, it wasn't until two years later that the word reached the slaves in Texas. General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston on June 19, 1865 with the intention of forcing slave owners to release their slaves, and the day has been celebrated since that time in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and other parts of the Deep South under the nickname "Juneteenth." Observed primarily in African-American communities, Juneteenth festivities usually include parades, picnics, and baseball games.
Joel Souza
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 7:49:29 AM

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Juneteenth or Emancipation Day, June 19th, holiday celebrating the end of slavery in the United States. It began in Texas when news of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation
(effective Jan. 1, 1863) finally reached Galveston on June 19, 1865. Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger read a general order to the assembled people stating that "all slaves are free," and Texas thus became the last state to learn of the Confederate surrender and the freeing of the slaves. The announcement sparked immediate celebration in the local black community, and the following year the date was again commemorated.
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