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Hand or not? Options
Kunstniete
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 3:21:31 AM

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Location: Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Good day everyone,

I'm curious if there is a difference between the "right side" and the "right-hand side"? (Or the corresponding "left"-versions ;)

Thank you very much Angel

The value of choice is not in the size of the action but in its effect.
Peter O'Connor - Dundalk
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 6:46:54 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/20/2014
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Location: Lismore, Munster, Ireland
The right-hand-side is more emphatic and is (I feel) clearer.
eg Walking down the aisle he sat on the right / he sat on the right-hand-side. Think about someone walking in an aircraft - from the front. On the right (port) is a possibility, however right-hand-side is clearly starboard. Pray
sureshot
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 11:49:50 AM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
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There is minor difference between "right-hand side" and "right side". Generally, "right-hand side" implies "the right side of the body". A common meaning of "right side" is "the side with the hand that most people write with". Its opposite is "left side". An example of "right side" is:

- The old man had a scar on the right side of his face.

"Right side" is used in varied idiomatic expressions. A few of them together with the meaning are:

1. on the right/wrong side of 50/60 etc: It is an informal expression. "Right side of 50" means "younger than 50" and its opposite is "wrong side of 50". It means "older than 50".

2. keep on the right side of somebody: It means "to be careful not to annoy someone, because you want them to help you and not cause problems for you" e.g.
- We tried to keep on the right side of the guard, so that he would let us in late at night after the party.

3. on the wrong/right side of the law: It is an informal expression. "Right side of the law" means "not breaking the law". Its opposite is "wrong side of the law". It means "breaking the law".




NKM
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 12:32:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Rules of the road --

Americans drive on the right-hand side of the road, so we drive "left-hand drive" cars — meaning that the driver's seat is at the left side of the car so that we can see oncoming and overtaking traffic as easily as possible. We refer to the left and right sides of the car as "driver's side" and "passenger side" respectively.

The British normally use "right-hand drive" cars and drive on the left side of the road. (This has led American punsters to talk about the Brits as always driving on the "wrong" side of the road and thinking that "left is right and right is wrong.")

I recall reading, quite some years ago, about a country (Sweden, I think) which changed its law from the British rules to the American standard. I guess they must have handled the transition well, as I don't remember hearing about a lot of accidents caused by the potential confusion. Still, I'm glad I wasn't there!

Kunstniete
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 3:08:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/25/2017
Posts: 1,121
Neurons: 146,207
Location: Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Thanks to all of you for all the clearing and informative comments.

The value of choice is not in the size of the action but in its effect.
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