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Which one would you consider to be correct? Options
You know who I am
Posted: Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:21:19 AM

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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Hey guys.

I drew two different trees and would like you to tell me what you think is right. It's about classifying Adverbs of Degree and Intensifiers:
1: http://imgur.com/HRaTKuL

2: http://imgur.com/eV8FYM5

In the first picture, Adverbs of Degree and Intensifiers are categorized differently; in the second picture, Intensifiers are a subcategory of Adverbs of Degree.

How would you classify them?


I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 13, 2017 6:48:21 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,631
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

One could split the class "adverb" into many 'classes'.

One German site I found (teaching English for German children) named seventeen types!

Most grammars limit it to five or six, plus the category 'general sentence adverbs'.
I can personally see eight groups, really. (Attitude/emotion/evaluation could split, but I'd rather limit the number.)

Time, (then, now, yesterday)
place, (here, there)
manner, (quickly, laboriously)
degree, (much, more, less, little)
purpose/cause, (thus, hence, consequently)
frequency, (often, rarely)
evaluation/attitude/emotion, (sadly, happily, unfortunately)
probability, (possibly, probably)

The more categories you choose, the more complex does description and 'rule-making' become.
Some adverbs in some sentences actually act as two (maybe more, possibly) categories at the same time.

For this reason (to keep the list as small as possible) I'd put all adverbs of degree in one category, rather than split into intensifiers and mitigators.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
You know who I am
Posted: Saturday, May 13, 2017 7:16:21 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

One could split the class "adverb" into many 'classes'.

One German site I found (teaching English for German children) named seventeen types!

Most grammars limit it to five or six, plus the category 'general sentence adverbs'.
I can personally see eight groups, really. (Attitude/emotion/evaluation could split, but I'd rather limit the number.)

Time, (then, now, yesterday)
place, (here, there)
manner, (quickly, laboriously)
degree, (much, more, less, little)
purpose/cause, (thus, hence, consequently)
frequency, (often, rarely)
evaluation/attitude/emotion, (sadly, happily, unfortunately)
probability, (possibly, probably)

The more categories you choose, the more complex does description and 'rule-making' become.
Some adverbs in some sentences actually act as two (maybe more, possibly) categories at the same time.

For this reason (to keep the list as small as possible) I'd put all adverbs of degree in one category, rather than split into intensifiers and mitigators.


You are correct. When we classify them in different categories, ruling them will be hard and there will probably be conflicts.

One more question, Drag: Only a degree adverb or intensifier can modify an adverb and adjective, or is there any other grammatical class that can modify them?

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 13, 2017 8:03:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,631
Neurons: 134,400
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

I think (I'm not sure) that the ones which normally modify adverbs and adjectives are:
Degree: very fast, slightly sadly
evaluation/attitude/emotion: happily enthusiastic, sadly noble
probability: "He was, happily, most likely rich."

In that last example there are two ways to look at it:
1. 'most likely' qualifies 'rich'; 'most' qualifies 'probably' and 'happily' qualifies the whole sentence.
2. 'most' qualifies 'probably'; 'most probably' and 'happily' qualify the whole sentence.

Time, frequency, manner and place normally qualify a verb or clause.
Purpose and evaluation/attitude/emotion adverbs seem to normally cover the whole clause.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
You know who I am
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:37:17 AM

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Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 569
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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I think (I'm not sure) that the ones which normally modify adverbs and adjectives are:
Degree: very fast, slightly sadly
evaluation/attitude/emotion: happily enthusiastic, sadly noble
probability: "He was, happily, most likely rich."

In that last example there are two ways to look at it:
1. 'most likely' qualifies 'rich'; 'most' qualifies 'probably' and 'happily' qualifies the whole sentence.
2. 'most' qualifies 'probably'; 'most probably' and 'happily' qualify the whole sentence.

Time, frequency, manner and place normally qualify a verb or clause.
Purpose and evaluation/attitude/emotion adverbs seem to normally cover the whole clause.


Thank you, Drag!

How about modifying verbs? What category modifies verb?

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 9:14:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,631
Neurons: 134,400
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I think that they can all (in some sentences) be said to simply qualify the verb.

However, one could, I suppose, look at many of them as qualifying the clause, even so.

"He ran quickly" - I would say 'quickly' modifies 'ran'.
However someone else may look at it and say 'quickly' modifies 'he ran'.

It makes no difference how you label it, the sentence means the same.

Purpose, evaluation and probability seem to be less 'verb-oriented'.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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