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I had not that relief in this trouble that from the resignation I used to practise I hoped to have Options
vkhu
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 9:29:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/18/2012
Posts: 601
Neurons: 4,467
Quote:
Thus, fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself, when apparent to the eyes; and we find the burden of anxiety greater, by much, than the evil which we are anxious about: and what was worse than all this, I had not that relief in this trouble that from the resignation I used to practise I hoped to have.

-Robinson Crusoe


I read this part of the sentence 5 times in a row and still don't have a single clue what he's on about. Can someone elaborate?
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:33:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 8,208
Neurons: 43,875
vkhu wrote:
Quote:
Thus, fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself, when apparent to the eyes; and we find the burden of anxiety greater, by much, than the evil which we are anxious about: and what was worse than all this, I had not that relief in this trouble that from the resignation I used to practise I hoped to have.

-Robinson Crusoe


I read this part of the sentence 5 times in a row and still don't have a single clue what he's on about. Can someone elaborate?


I don't blame you. It is a mouthful of a sentence and its meaning easily confusing.

In its simple form, he is saying he used to practice a kind of resignation with his worries and fears. In other words, he would adopt the idea that whatever happend was okay, and this would give him some relief from fear and worry.

In this case, however, that resignation didn't relieve him of his anxiety. He found that the fear of danger was worse than the danger itself, and he couldn't let it go.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:39:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 323,355
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
vkhu wrote:
Quote:
Thus, fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself, when apparent to the eyes; and we find the burden of anxiety greater, by much, than the evil which we are anxious about: and what was worse than all this, I had not that relief in this trouble that from the resignation I used to practise I hoped to have.

-Robinson Crusoe


I read this part of the sentence 5 times in a row and still don't have a single clue what he's on about. Can someone elaborate?

Brother! I am reading this book just now. :)

Let us first condense it to this:

I did not have that relief that I hoped to have.

Now let us look deeper into the matter:

relief in this trouble

from the resignation

resignation I used to practise

And finally:

I had not (that relief in this trouble) that (from the resignation I used to practice) I hoped to have.

The first parenthesised phrase is an object which is indispensable in this sentence, the second is a complement and you can safely chuck it out.


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
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