The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Tucked Options
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 11:51:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2014
Posts: 851
Neurons: 3,750


Which sentence is best to describe the sketch above?

1) She wants the shops to be tucked underneath the main building.

2) She wants the shops to be tucked inside the main building.

3) She wants the shops to be tucked below the main building.

My take: 1) is the better than 3) but still might give the impression that the shops and the main building are two separate entities. 2) is technically correct but could be a little ambiguous (the shops could be on the 2nd floor, not on the ground floor). 3) sounds wrong, like the main building and the shops are two separate entities.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 12, 2017 12:18:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,945
Neurons: 137,007
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
There's another word 'beneath' which could replace 'underneath' and 'below' - but they all sound a bit like you have a building, then dig under it and put some shops in the hole, underground.

"Inside" describes it best but, as you say, it doesn't specify the ground floor.

I think you would have to change the wording a little.

She wants the shops to be tucked in the ground floor of the main building.
Or, a little more formally:
She wants the shops to be included on the ground floor of the main building.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Priscilla86
Posted: Friday, May 12, 2017 3:34:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2014
Posts: 851
Neurons: 3,750
Hi, Drag0!

Yes, I got that impression, too with 'underneath', 'beneath', and 'below', that the shops are underground.

What if, hypothetically, this is the first time ever such set-up has ever been created? (I know it's not)

Let's say for some reason, the building codes didn't allow for shops to be placed on the ground floor of a multi-story building before (previously required to be open-air due to fire risks etc.) but now they do and this building would be the first to ever have such set-up. What would be a good, to-the-point, simplest way of phrasing it?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 12, 2017 4:10:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,945
Neurons: 137,007
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
If the ground floor is completely shops (very common in cities here, shops on the ground floor and living accommodation, flats etc above), I would say:
She wants the ground floor (of the building) to comprise shops.
She wants the ground floor to be composed of shops.

If (as it looks in your diagram) only part of the ground floor is shops:
She wants the ground floor to include shops.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.