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(Advanced) A VERY important expression Options
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 7:50:29 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,228
Neurons: 19,793
NOT A TEACHER


Dear Fellow Learners:


If you do not know this expression yet, you definitely should add it to your list. I hope that my example can give you the general idea. (Of course, as usual, consult a good bilingual dictionary.)


*****


John Doe has been the president of the Rainbow Ice Cream Company for one year.

He knows nothing about the ice cream industry.

He accepted the position because he likes the title "president," he earns $500,000 a year, and he is required to come to work only one day a week. (He spends the other days on the golf course.)

When he does show up to work, he passes the day in his beautiful office watching TV, surfing the Web, and speaking on the phone with his stockbroker.

Ms. Scott is his secretary. She has been there for 25 years. She knows everything about the industry, and she is acquainted with all 500 employees.

When Mr. Doe is present, Ms. Scott brings documents for him to sign.

Ms. Scott has prepared those documents (orders, etc.) herself. She has not asked for any advice from Mr. Doe.

Mr. Doe could not care less about what Ms. Scott has decided. He just signs anything that she places in front of him.

The 500 employees respect (and fear) Ms. Scott.

They know that, for all intents and purposes, Ms. Scott is the president of their company. ( = Ms. Scott's title is "secretary." In reality, however, she is running the business.)


I wish all of you a nice (Thurs)day!
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 9:53:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/20/2015
Posts: 942
Neurons: 9,754
Yes, I added it to my vocabulary note.
It's a lot easier to learn by heart from you because of all the dialogs and situations you provide for us. Thanks,again.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 10:18:58 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 500
Neurons: 2,219
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan






Father and Daughter





Cat Stevens

















TheParser
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 10:32:46 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,228
Neurons: 19,793
Thank you, Frosty, for your very kind comments.

Thank you, Almo, for your always interesting contributions. (Is that the great Audrey Hepburn? Remember that great movie with her and Gregory Peck in Rome?)



I wish you both a nice day!
taurine
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 10:35:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 367
Neurons: 36,787
I think that the method of teaching as embraced by TheParser by means of situational context where characters are treated lightly, is good. Really good.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 10:48:01 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,228
Neurons: 19,793



Taurine, as my hero Florence Nightingale once said when she was complimented, "Too kind, too kind!"


Have a great day!
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 11:30:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 500
Neurons: 2,219
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan





By the way, this is Audrey Hepburn, of course.


No relation to frosty something.









tunaafi
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 11:50:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,094
Neurons: 51,935
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
TheParser wrote:


They know that, for all intents and purposes, Ms. Scott is the president of their company. ( = Ms. Scott's title is "secretary." In reality, however, she is running the business.)


True, but learners should not get the idea that 'in reality' and 'For/To all intents and purposes' are exact synonyms. I'd say that closer terms normally would be: For all practical purposes, in everything but name, practically, virtually.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, May 11, 2017 4:33:57 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,228
Neurons: 19,793
almo 1 wrote:





By the way, this is Audrey Hepburn, of course.















Thank you for that illustration.

So regal. So graceful. So beautiful. So ladylike.

What a wonderful model for today's young women.

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