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Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 2:10:43 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 661
Neurons: 3,730
Adverbs are confusing to both native and native speakers of English alike.
https://owlcation.com/humanities/Different-types-of-adverbs
Is "alike" an adverb means in the similar way and modify "confusing"?
Which type of adverb is it in the example?
Thanks
sureshot
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 4:38:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 1,824
Neurons: 338,410
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Adverbs are confusing to both native and native speakers of English alike.
https://owlcation.com/humanities/Different-types-of-adverbs
Is "alike" an adverb means in the similar way and modify "confusing"?
Which type of adverb is it in the example?
Thanks


__________________

"Alike" is an adverb used to emphasize that you mean both the people, groups, or things that you have just mentioned. In my view, "alike" is functioning as an adverb of degree meaning "equally/both to the same degree".


You know who I am
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 7:50:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 594
Neurons: 4,687
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Adverbs are confusing to both native and native speakers of English alike.
https://owlcation.com/humanities/Different-types-of-adverbs
Is "alike" an adverb means in the similar way and modify "confusing"?
Which type of adverb is it in the example?
Thanks


Hello.

According to Cambridge: Alike can act in two ways:

1 - Adjectively: Similar to each other - Only used predicatively (after a linking verb)

2 - Adverbialy: In a similar way.



Adverbs
modify verbs, adjectives, other adverbs and sometimes clauses, whereas Adjectives can only modify nouns.

So, either is Alike modifying the verb "are", which seems impossible, or it is modifying the Noun "Speakers".

I would say that this is acting as an adverb modifying the entire clause "being confusing to both native...", which means: In a similar way.


I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
thar
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 8:06:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,460
Neurons: 61,646
Well, what is confusing is they are not likening two different things!

Surely it should be

..to non-native and native speakers alike.

Ie
Native speakers, like non-native speakers, find adverbs confusing.


Except that isn't true.
Natives just use them.
They may not follow the official 'rules', but as native speakers they are, by default, speaking the language.
They only find them confusing when asked to analyse what they say!

Having said that - this feels like bad grammar.

Either
To both native and non-native
Or
To native and non-native alike

But NOT
to both alike.

Now that is bad English.
So apart from the error (they happen, but it means it hasn't been checked) you have the bad grammar mistake - not trusting that site one inch!Shame on you
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 8:54:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,452
Neurons: 141,825
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
To answer the original question first:
I agree with both sureshot and You know who I am.
"Alike" seems to me to be acting as an adverb for the whole idea of "Adverbs are confusing to . . ."
Adverbs are confusing to natives and, to a similar degree and in the same manner, are confusing to non-natives.

*************
I also agree with thar (mostly).
"both ______ and ______ alike" is just redundant.

Also, natives do not find adverbs confusing.
Some know nothing about them at all and say things like "I speak good" instead of "I speak well". They are not confused, they are just 'unknowing'.
Most know very little theory about adverbs but know exactly how to use them. Again, they are not confused.

What is confusing, really, for native English-speakers (from whichever continent) is how to describe the usages.

How do you tell someone why you know what these sentences in red mean?
1. Sadly, one member of the audience applauded.
2. One member of the audience applauded sadly.
3. Sadly, only member one of the audience applauded.
4. Only one member of the audience applauded sadly.


How do you explain that '1' could mean the same as '2', but '3' cannot mean the same as '4'. The change is exactly the same (the adverb moves from the beginning to the end).

#2 means that one member of the audience applauded and that was in a sad way.
#3 means that it is a sad fact that one member of the audience applauded.
#4 means that only one member of the audience applauded in a sad way - the rest were ecstatic.
#1 is ambiguous.

This is confusing - not the fact of the sentences meaning different things, or what they mean - but how to explain it!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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