The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Apparently Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 8:46:06 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 997
Neurons: 5,403
The Indian Premier League is back for its tenth season, and apparently getting higher viewership than before.

https://m.rediff.com/cricket/column/the-good-of-the-ipl/20170419.htm
How do I know that "apparently" functoning as an adverb and which of the adverb question does it answer-how, where, when and why?
Thanks

sureshot
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 9:47:47 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 1,841
Neurons: 341,934
Jigneshbharati wrote:
The Indian Premier League is back for its tenth season, and apparently getting higher viewership than before.

https://m.rediff.com/cricket/column/the-good-of-the-ipl/20170419.htm
How do I know that "apparently" functoning as an adverb and which of the adverb question does it answer-how, where, when and why?
Thanks


___________________

Certain adverbs modify the whole sentence and normally express the speaker's/narrators opinion. These are known as "Sentence Adverbs". Some grammarians prefer to use the expression "Comment Adverbs" for some Sentence Adverbs. "Apparently" is a sentence adverb and is often used to soften the statement and make it sound less dogmatic. It is usually used to say that you have heard that something is true, although you are not completely sure about it and hence you can't guarantee its correctness. The use of the adverb "apparently" in the given text implies that the speaker/narrator opines that IPL is getting higher viewership than before but can't guarantee the truth of the assertion.

Also remember that Adverbs of Manner usually answer the question word "how"; Adverbs of Place usually answer the question word "where"; Adverbs of Time usually answer the question word "when" and Adverbs of Reason usually answer the question word "why". All kinds of adverbs are not covered by these four question words.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 11:36:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,123
Neurons: 187,004
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
sureshot wrote:

Also remember that Adverbs of Manner usually answer the question word "how"; Adverbs of Place usually answer the question word "where"; Adverbs of Time usually answer the question word "when" and Adverbs of Reason usually answer the question word "why". All kinds of adverbs are not covered by these four question words.

══════════════════════════════════════════════

That's true. Adverbs, like most components of English, can be used in a number of different ways. In this particular case, I suppose "apparently" could be called an "Adverb of Attitude" (though I've never heard of that phrase). Better, perhaps, to reserve a category of "Adverb at Large" or maybe simply "generic/unspecified."

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:15:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,121
Neurons: 149,475
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Applause

This is a partial list of types from Woodward English - 'grammar.cl/Notes'

Quote:
Types of Adverbs
There are many types of adverbs, such as:

Adverbs of Frequency - always, sometimes, never, etc.

Adverbs of Manner - carefully, slowly

Adverbs of Time and Place - here, yesterday, then

Adverbs of Relative Time - recently, already, soon

Adverbs of Degree - very, extremely, rather

Adverbs of Quantity - a few, a lot, much

Adverbs of Attitude - fortunately, apparently, clearly


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 1:48:58 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 997
Neurons: 5,403
Thanks
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.