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enjoying vs having enjoyed Options
D00M
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 12:01:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
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Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.
Having enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.

How the above sentences differ in meaning?

As far as I'm concerned the following parts are participial non-finite clauses:

Having enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games
Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games

What would be the finite form of each?

Thank you in advance



I am looking forward to your answers.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 12:44:06 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
There's no such thing as a non-finite clause.

clause
Clauses are groups of words that contain both a subject and a predicate.

Farlex Grammar Book

1. Grammar A group of words containing a subject and a predicate and forming part of a compound or complex sentence.
American Heritage Dictionary

1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence.
Collins English Dictionary

Those things you quote do not have a subject and they do not contain a finite verb. They are phrases.
They are participle phrases which describe the state/attitude of the home team - so they could be said to be acting as adjectives.
They also describe one of the reasons they won the game so easily. So some people would say that they are adverbials of cause or reason. (This is the one I would prefer.)

*************
The difference between the two is the tense of 'enjoy' - when were they in this state of enjoyment?

The first uses the present participle, so they were enjoying the benefit of the week off at the same time as they were winning the match.
The second uses the past participle - a perfect formation. So they enjoyed the benefits of the week off and then went on to win the match immediately afterwards.

**********
The equivalent sentences using full clauses as adverbs would be:
Because they were enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.
Because they had just enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.


The equivalent sentences using full clauses as adjectives would be:
The home team, who were enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, won this match in a walk.
The home team, who had just enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, won this match in a walk.


***********
As a minor comment, "in a walk" is not a phrase I've heard - but it makes good sense, it's a good idiom which 'matches' the very descriptive "it was a walk-over", so I continued using it.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
You know who I am
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 12:52:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 599
Neurons: 4,712
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
D00M wrote:
Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.
Having enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.

How the above sentences differ in meaning?

As far as I'm concerned the following parts are participial non-finite clauses:

Having enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games
Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games

What would be the finite form of each?

Thank you in advance



Hi, D00M.

In an older analysis of clause, your sentences would not be considered to be clauses but phrases.
Here is a brief definition of clause:
A group of words containing a subject, a verb showing tense and inflected by person and gender with optional modifiers.

Nevertheless, nowadays, it can be considered to be a clause since it is a short version of one; some grammarians still argue about it. (Drag0n is coming!!)

Anyway,

For me, "Having enjoyed the benefinit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk" sounds better, which implies that the home team won the match because they had enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games. I.e: it implies one action that happened before another.


In this example: Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk. It implies that the actions are happening at the same time, i.e: simultaneously: While the home team enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, they won this match in a walk.

So, to sumn up: When you use the perfect aspect in a participal non-finite clause, you imply one action that happened before another; however, when you simply use two sentences like that, it is more likely to be two simultaneous actions, i.e: happening at the same time.



These would be your finite-version clauses:

Because the home team had enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, they won this match in a walk.
(Participial non-finite clause/phrase implying: Reason)

While the home team enjoyed the benefit of a week off between games, they won this match in a walk. (This one doesn't make much sense)
(Participial non-finite clause/phrase implying: Time)

Have a happy Easter!


I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
You know who I am
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 12:53:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 599
Neurons: 4,712
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Yep. Drag has already come!
Lol

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 1:31:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,114
Neurons: 149,104
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
You know who I am wrote:
Yep. Drag has already come!
Lol



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
NKM
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 1:52:02 PM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I agree with DragO. A clause is a clause, and a phrase is a phrase. (A pseudo-clause, maybe?)

And let's not read too much into the word "enjoy." Whether or not the team actually enjoyed their week off, they seem to have reaped the benefit of it.

D00M
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 2:30:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 668
Neurons: 3,660
Thank you great teachers.

I found the original sentence here, Dragon:

Win in a walk

I am looking forward to your answers.
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