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substitute replace Options
D00M
Posted: Saturday, April 15, 2017 12:25:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 668
Neurons: 3,660
Hi.

A: This is a sample example named x.


1) I want to substitute y with x.
2) I want to substitute y for x.
3) I want to replace x by y.
4) I want to replace x with y.

So:

B: This is a sample example named y.

Are my sentences (1-4) okay which would result in sentence B?


I am looking forward to your answers.
thar
Posted: Saturday, April 15, 2017 1:26:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,867
Neurons: 63,560
3 you don't say.

You replace 'old' with 'new'.
....

Substitute is different.

The preposition is important.

Think of what the preposition would mean in a football match.

I want to substitute a player.
With whom?
With a new player.
What is the tool you use to make the substitution? - the player on the bench.
I want to substitute 'old' with 'new'


I want to send in a substitute.
For whom?
Who is the recipient of that action? - the player on the field.
I want to substitute 'new' for 'old'.
NKM
Posted: Saturday, April 15, 2017 4:14:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,116
Neurons: 186,106
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
D00M wrote:
Hi.

A: This is a sample example named x.


1) I want to substitute y with x.
2) I want to substitute y for x.
3) I want to replace x by y.
4) I want to replace x with y.

So:

B: This is a sample example named y.

Are my sentences (1-4) okay which would result in sentence B?
══════════════════════════════════════════════

1) I want to substitute y with x.
- Most of us would take this to mean that you want to remove y and put x in its place, which is not what you intended.

2) I want to substitute y for x.
- This has the desired meaning: to remove x and insert y in place of it.

3) I want to replace x by y.
4) I want to replace x with y.
- Both 3) and 4) have the desired meaning, though some of us might say that "replace … by" is less appropriate for formal use.

In English, unlike some other languages, "substitute a for b" is the exact opposite of "replace a with b."

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