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commit to the god Options
D00M
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 8:56:23 AM

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Hi.

Is it natural English to say: I commit you to the almighty God?

If yes, in what situations is it uttered?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 10:20:21 AM

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No - I don't know what it would mean.

The only phrase I know like that is to commit someone to the grave.
They have died and you bury them in the grave.

There are other uses of 'commit'.
To commit a crime is to do the action of the crime.
To commit someone to a mental institution is to imprison then in a mental ward.
To commit oneself to some action is to fully decide to do it and reach a point where you can't change your mind.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
D00M
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 10:31:54 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
No - I don't know what it would mean.

The only phrase I know like that is to commit someone to the grave.
They have died and you bury them in the grave.


Thank you very much.

I hate some non-native speakers in my country who invent new expressions by rendering some expressions word by word from the native language into English.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 10:50:46 AM
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The lapsed choir boy in me has to say there are parts of the bible where the phrase 'I commit you to God' may be used, although it depends on the version of the bible that a particular church uses.
For example Pauls farewell to the Ephesians Acts20:32.
In the King James Bible says.
Quote:

And now, brethren, I commend you to God, and to the word of his grace, which is able to build you up, and to give you an inheritance among all them which are sanctified.


But in the New International it is:
Quote:

"Now I commit you to God and to the word of his grace, which can build you up and give you an inheritance among all those who are sanctified.


It refers to,the last of DragOnspeakers meanings to fully decide to give themselves to God.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 10:59:33 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,238
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hmmmm Think . For me, that only works for oneself.

You can commit yourself to something - by deciding that that is totally what you will do/follow/perform.

But you can't decide for someone else.

If is used to mean the same as "commend", then it means "entrust" or "consign".

"I put you in the care of god" or "I leave you in the care of god."

That is more or less what "Goodbye" means - "God b(e with) ye".

However, no, it is not something you would hear.
None of those phrases are something you would hear.

You would hear "'Bye" or "See you later" or "Good night" or something like that.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
D00M
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 12:10:15 PM

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Could we use the following expressions in everyday speech, Dragon?

"I put you in the care of god" or "I leave you in the care of god."

What may make one use these expressions? Could you think of a situation which justifies using them?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 12:19:32 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
D00M wrote:
What may make one use these expressions? Could you think of a situation which justifies using them?

Maybe the priest would say such a thing over a dead body at a Christian funeral.

Definitely not "everyday speech".

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 3:16:24 PM
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hmmmm Think . For me, that only works for oneself.

You can commit yourself to something - by deciding that that is totally what you will do/follow/perform.

But you can't decide for someone else.

If is used to mean the same as "commend", then it means "entrust" or "consign".

"I put you in the care of god" or "I leave you in the care of god."

That is more or less what "Goodbye" means - "God b(e with) ye".

However, no, it is not something you would hear.
None of those phrases are something you would hear.

You would hear "'Bye" or "See you later" or "Good night" or something like that.


I would agree they are not things that you would hear in normal everyday speech, but the same is true of a lot of the language used in the Bible.

I would not commit someone else to something but St Paul, may be considered a special case by the second versions translators.

He was according to some the most important of the disciples of Jesus and had spiritual authority over those within the faith at the time.

But it's down to the words chosen by the translators of that version of the bible not my own.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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