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(Expression) There is NO "good" decision Options
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 8:51:12 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
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NOT A TEACHER


Dear Fellow Learners:

Here is an American expression that you will definitely hear or read. (I am guessing that there is something similar in your language.)

*****

Here is an example that many teachers give, for it is a simple way to remember this expression.


*****


Raul is standing on top of a very high mountain.

When he looks down, he sees the roaring ocean.

Of course, he is careful not to fall from the high mountain into the ocean.

Then he suddenly sees a lion coming toward him.

What should he do?

If he continues to stand there, the lion will soon come up to him and ...

If he jumps off the mountain, he will fall into the ocean and ...


The expression is: Raul is caught between a rock and a hard place."

In other words, it does not matter which decision he makes: both decisions are unpleasant.



Have a nice day!


Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 9:01:23 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
In Hindi we say this idiom as;
Aage Kuan, Peechhay Khai (A (water)well ahead and a deep gorge behind).

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Lotje1000
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 10:03:35 AM

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Location: Gent, Flanders, Belgium
I believe it's similar to choosing between the devil and the deep blue sea.
In Dutch we say "kiezen tussen de pest en de cholera".
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 10:05:12 AM
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Thank you, Mr. Joshi.

Very interesting, indeed!



Have a nice day!
thar
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 3:04:03 PM

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á milli steins og sleggju

Between a rock and a sledgehammer!

Or

milli tveggja elda

Between two fires
For having no good choice.

In Icelandic


Interesting that Dutch is not a physical metaphor (if you know what I mean d'oh! )

Of course the added point about between a rock and a hard place is that they are different ways of describing the same thing - that is the point of the problem!


And of course, there are the horns of that mysterious dilemna.... (Yes, I had to override the autocorrect, this time, instead of the other way round. Liar )


On the bright side, Raul is a wildlife photographer and a cliff diver. He is having the best day of his life! Applause
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 3:33:34 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

But no-one has mentioned the original - Between Scylla and Charybdis.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 4:06:13 AM

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Ah, but in that one, there is a way out. In fact that answer was to do nothing.
Go procrastinators! :)


It is also a testament to corruption. It doesn't matter how much of a jerk you are, if you have friends in high places, you always come out OK.


I had to check it out - I was confusing it with sailing too close to sirens.

So according to your link, originally it wasn't the dilemma, it was the decision it described
Quote:
incidit in scyllam cupiens vitare charybdim - (he runs into Scylla, wishing to avoid Charybdis) .

-out of the frying pan into the fire. Just more sailorish.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 5:59:53 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Finnish:

Ojasta allikkoon, from dike to ditch.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 6:30:15 AM

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Interesting.
I didn't associate Finland in particular with dykes and ditches - but I suppose if you have flat land of course ditches become important.

But what is bad about the dyke?

(I know, idioms don't have to make sense. They make their own meaning. It just made me wonder Think )

I love that you can say that in two words. Applause
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 7:03:07 AM
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thar wrote:



On the bright side, Raul is a wildlife photographer and a cliff diver. He is having the best day of his life!



Thanks for making my day!
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 7:06:31 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,002
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

But no-one has mentioned the original - Between Scylla and Charybdis.




Many thanks for helping those advanced learners who want to go a little further into the background of that expression.



Have a nice day!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 11:10:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 969
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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India


Pic posted by DragO, and thar has reference to Between Scylla and Charybdis.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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