The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Taking Back Snowflakes Options
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 11:58:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,730
Neurons: 34,381
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
A snowflake flower.



snow·flake
ˈsnōˌflāk/
noun
plural noun: snowflakes
1 1. 
a flake of snow, especially a feathery ice crystal, typically displaying delicate sixfold symmetry.

2 2. 
a white-flowered Eurasian plant related to and resembling the snowdrop, typically blooming in the summer or autumn.

I never heard the word snowflake used as an insult until recently here on the forum. One of the insults is that if one is called the term it means one is easily offended.

Well, what offends me is the misappropriation of a beautiful creation by Mother Nature and using it as an insult to everybody. (other thread)

Snowflakes are delicate, pure, and every one is an individual. The flower is just so beautiful.

So I think I shall "take the word back again" and if it is ever used as an insult against me, be proud to be an individualist who is beautiful and pure.

My brother is an amateur photographer who studies how to create such photos as these. And people interested in science study the formation of snowflakes. Scientists prefer the term snow crystal.

http://www.snowcrystals.com/photos/photos.html

"This page shows photographs of real snowflakes that fell from the winter clouds. Click on any image for a closer look. I took these pictures at a variety of locations, including northern Ontario, central Alaska, northern Sweden, Vermont, and the Michigan Upper Peninsula
."

https://digital-photography-school.com/amazing-snowflake-images-shot-diy-camera-set/

The hairs are from a carpet as the pix are taken just before the snowflake hits it.
This quote is from Huffington Post - pix are from the same photographer as in link directly above so the link from HP was not necessary.

More than a few artists have proved that macrophotography has merits beyond simply magnifying very small things. It can also capture aesthetically beautiful images lurking beyond our usual visual perception, whether they’re hiding inside a meteorite or on the wing of a dragonfly... or inside falling snow.



A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 12:01:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,730
Neurons: 34,381
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
I'm sure some posters could explain the science of why they are all different - just as every human body is different with different irises and fingerprints.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/the-science-of-snowflakes/

"A few facts about snow crystals: They are formed from water vapor that condenses directly into ice inside of clouds. They take shape as water vapor molecules from cloud droplets condense and freeze on the surface of a seed crystal, and patterns emerge as these crystals grow. The seed crystal itself forms on a tiny particle, like a speck of dust in the air, which serves as a base for ice growth.

“You can actually see these ice nuclei in all snowflakes,” Hallett said. “Not with the naked eye or a regular microscope, but put it in an electromagnetic microscope and you will see it.”

Note: Snowflakes are not created from frozen raindrops. Liquid water that freezes in the atmosphere as it falls to the ground is actually sleet. And hail, Libbrecht said, is just a large piece of sleet that collects water and grows as it travels from the atmosphere to the ground.

Water molecules — made of one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms each — are ultimately responsible for the familiar six-sided shape we associate with snowflakes"
.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 7:47:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 435
Neurons: 64,865
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
One point of clarification, well, maybe 2.
It was a photographer who declared that no two snowflakes are the same -- it was never anything proven, just an emotional comment from someone photographing snowflakes.
There are more possible configurations of snowflakes than one can imagine, BUT that does NOT mean that a given configuration cannot be repeated until all possibilities have been exhausted.

Hope123
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 7:57:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,730
Neurons: 34,381
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Thanks for the info, Wilmar. I didn't know it was a photographer who said it. But yeah, if two fell that were the same, how would we ever know? Anxious

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/02/070213-snowflake_2.html




A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 9:31:21 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 384
Neurons: 1,648
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan


Just for Kowlege & Culture:


Snowflake is the stage of Travis Walton UFO incident



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travis_Walton_UFO_incident




"Religious convictions are a considerable source of bias in the matter of

extraterrestrial visitors. It is not necessarily a religious matter—no more than the

question of simple life on Mars is a religious matter. Unless your particular

religion denies that there are such things, it is an academic matter rather than a

religious one. Nevertheless, people made unnecessary religious interpretations,

pro and con, concerning the concept of visitation of earth by life from other

worlds.

The average individual is going to believe what he wants to believe,

regardless of evidence or facts. Those who believe we had a UFO experience are

going to believe exactly that and those who scoff will continue to scoff.

However, there is hope. There are alive today totally unbiased, rational

individuals (you?) who make judgments solely on the basis of logic. People who

are actually capable of withholding judgment indefinitely if there is insufficient

evidence for them to base a conclusion on.

My six coworkers and I know that the incident did, in all reality, happen. We

have our memories to help us accept the truth of our incredible experience. You

are not so fortunate (or unfortunate, depending on where you’re sitting). You

have only your powers of reason. Here’s the straight of it. The conclusion is

yours."

“Condemnation without investigation is the height of ignorance. ”

—Emerson



Romany
Posted: Monday, April 10, 2017 9:41:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 11,789
Neurons: 35,640
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

As no-one here actually understands HOW the Americans use this word - we've seen it used by both sides - it hasn't caught on here. Also, we don't have a culture of abuse for those people who think differently to the way we, personally, think. Or who put an X in a different box to the one we chose.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, April 10, 2017 10:36:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,730
Neurons: 34,381
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Romany wrote:

As no-one here actually understands HOW the Americans use this word - we've seen it used by both sides - it hasn't caught on here. Also, we don't have a culture of abuse for those people who think differently to the way we, personally, think. Or who put an X in a different box to the one we chose.


We don't either, Romany. That's why I had never heard it before. I shall ask my grans this weekend if from being online they have heard of it.

I like your terminology "culture of abuse".

Almo, so there is a place called Snowflake in AZ.





A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
Hope123
Posted: Monday, April 10, 2017 4:25:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,730
Neurons: 34,381
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Romany, I personally do not know of this culture of abuse but had forgotten that there is a culture of shaming online directed mostly at female journalists and female politicians in Canada and probably others.

I just got to the paper and saw an article this morning in the Toronto Star about how people are far too offended. But the columnist does NOT politicize it to groups. She cites several CDN examples - provinces being upset they didn't get enough exposure in a TV series about Canada, for example.

Some US blacks are offended that a white artist painted a homage to a famous "dearly beloved black boy" who was mutilated and murdered because a white woman now admits she lied that he had harassed her. Are blacks not allowed to paint white people?

Why not confront the white woman who lied? Why give an artist grief? What happened to freedom of speech? (DOJ may be opening the decades old case.)

Anyhow, Mallick gives an example of her correspondence with an adult woman in Manitoba who told her she was a "caustic man-hating witch". (I read Mallick's columns all the time - she is not. And the term was tame according to what Mallick usually gets.)

Mallick explains how the correspondence evolved to the point of the woman being PRE-offended by something Malick hadn't even written.

Mallick says she does not get offended even though she gets hate mail all the time because she sees "how taking offence ravages people's personalities". She heard her Scottish mother enough times tell her: "Life is difficult. Endure it. Toughen up. Go do something physical. Boil a turnip and mash it."

My point is that no where did Mallick or her reader accuse any one group of being easily offended. She said, "Taking personal offence is a growth industry...Outrage is always being sparked by something, justified or silly". In other words, it is a common modern phenomenon not limited to any one political party. But that seems to be the only two ways people come packaged in the US.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2017/04/10/be-offended-and-now-read-my-column-mallick.html


http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/04/10/why-dana-schutz-painted-emmett-till



A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
almo 1
Posted: Monday, April 10, 2017 11:35:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 384
Neurons: 1,648
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 12:23:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,202
Neurons: 131,196
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It always reminds me of Charlie Williams.

He was a Yorkshireman, with an infectious laugh and one of the broadest Yorkshire accents you would ever want to hear, but he was "a person of colour".



Much of his comedy was simply comedy, nothing racial, but occasionally he would 'poke fun at' his own colour and people's reactions to it.
He did a skit based on the Black & White Minstrel show, painting his face white. . .
In recounting conversations, he would sometimes use the names "Blackie", "Chalky", "Darkie" and "Snowflake" for his characters - possibly not exactly politically correct, but he was so natural and without rancour that I can't see anyone being upset by him.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 4:56:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,730
Neurons: 34,381
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Drago, used to be you could do that. There was a funny comedian - forget his name - who was extremely obese and he poked fun at his weight all the time. I expect that would be a no-no now too.

Some woman wrote a letter to the editor this morning complaining that when Trudeau placed the wreath at Vimy Ridge on Sunday that he should not have crossed himself. She said she is a Catholic too but he was representing all the faiths of the country and was there as PM and not as a person.

Can you believe that? I almost wrote a letter myself telling her to get a life. I bet/hope somebody does answer her.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.