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Unabated Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 4:55:16 PM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/unabated?q=unabated

The rain continued unabated.
I saw the above example sentence for "unabated" as an adjective.
How can it be an adjective if it doesn't answer the question- which one or how many?
It seems to modify the verb "continue" to me and thus answering the question "how"?
Thanks

You know who I am
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 5:05:21 PM

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Joined: 1/13/2017
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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Jigneshbharati wrote:
http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/unabated?q=unabated

The rain continued unabated.
I saw the above example sentence for "unabated" as an adjective.
How can it be an adjective if it doesn't answer the question- which one or how many?
It seems to modify the verb "continue" to me and thus answering the question "how"?
Thanks



Hi, Jignes.

"Unabated" is an adjectival predicate (an adjective which is the subject complement); "continued" is acting as a linking verb.

Linking verb:
a verb, such as 'be' or 'become', which links the subject to a noun or adjective that is more informative about the subject than the verb is - collinsdictionary



Unabated is a adjectival participle - An adjective which is derived from a verb, E.G: I was broken - Broken is acting as an adjective, which is derived from the verb: To break.

Unabated is a participle adjective which is derived from the verb: To Abate.


Other examples: I was frightened - Frightened is acting as an adjective, derived from the verb: To frighten.
I was interested - Interested is acting as an adjective, derived from the verb: To interest.

Jesus, He is the way, the truth and the life, no one gets to the Father if not through Him.
thar
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 6:56:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 14,709
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You could think of it this way.

An adjective give describes the state of a thing - cold, tired, unabated.


An adverb describes the way in which something happens - coldly, tiredly, unabatedly.


Sometimes it is obvious which one you are using.
I looked cold.
I was tired.
State.

He looked at me coldly.
I sighed tiredly.
Method.

Here, the rain was unabated. It didn't abate.
It continued unabated.

Are you really describing the rain, or the way it continued?
You are actually describing the rain - adjectival.
The verb here acts, as YK said, as a linking verb.
It is still the rain which is unabated.
You are not describing the continuation.


You could describe the way it rained.

It rained unabatedly.
That describes how it rained - adverb.

You also have to remember that the distinction between adjectives and adverbs can be pretty fuzzy. Language works on patterns, and there is a pattern that what look like adjectives can be used as adverbs - hard, fast.
Frankly, if the adverb brings it to five syllables, you would probably drop the -ed anyway!
It rained unabated.

For example, you wouldn't say ' he looked at me interestedly'. You would choose another way to say it. 'He looked at me with interest'.

I don't think most adjectives would pass your test of 'which one?' or 'how many?'. Think
tunaafi
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 7:09:57 PM

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Joined: 6/3/2014
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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
thar wrote:
I don't think most adjectives would pass your test of 'which one?' or 'how many?'. Think


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