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Looking completely fit Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 10:12:05 AM
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ing-clauses example of adverbials:
She didn't come into the competition looking completely fit.
I saw the above sentence in the video about ing-clauses and its uses.
How do we know that the ing-clause here is adverbial- which of the adverb questions does it answer here- how , when, where and why?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2INvmW7sVqQ

Thanks in advance.
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 2:35:52 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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So does it answer the question how(adverb of manner) and modify the verb "come" or describing the pronoun "she" and answering the question-which one?
Thanks in advance
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 8:39:51 AM
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I think "looking completely fit" can be regarded as either (a) adverbial, answering the question 'how', or (b) adjectival, describing "she".

Any other opinions?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 9:49:11 AM

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I suppose it could be either, but it seems to me that it mainly describes the reverse/negative of "her at the time she entered the competition". It seems more of an adjectival phrase.
It is a participle phrase, it is not a clause.

"looking completely fit"
It cannot be a clause, as it does not contain a subject and finite verb.

Clauses are groups of words that contain both a subject and a predicate.
Farlex Grammar

1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence.
Collins Dictionary

A unit of grammatical organization next below the sentence in rank and in traditional grammar said to consist of a subject and predicate.
Oxford Dictionary

specialized language: a group of words, consisting of a subject and a finite form of a verb:
Cambridge Dictionary


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
tunaafi
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 9:54:28 AM

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Audiendus wrote:
I think "looking completely fit" can be regarded as either (a) adverbial, answering the question 'how', or (b) adjectival, describing "she".

Any other opinions?


I incline to the adjective view, but I would not stake my life on it.

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