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Meaning of words Options
Nousher Ahmed 1
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 12:50:39 AM

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Joined: 4/2/2014
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Location: Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
1. My guess is that he sold the film rights to his life, faked his own death and lived happily ever after.

I coudn't figure out the meaning of film rights to his life, faked his own death. I would feel happy if anyone tells the meaning of it and rewrite these parts with other words.

2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would really.

What would most people really do? This sentence is not complete, and the omitted part has been mentioned before. But I cannot find which part that has been omitted has been mentioned before.

3. Originality, ever prized, is increasingly scarce, but we can offer you these.

I cannot understand this sentence at all. It would be helpful if experts of this forum rewrite it in an easier way, and explain it.

All these three sentences have been from this link. All this three sentences have a common word, ever.

Thanks in advance! Boo hoo!
dkf
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 1:57:13 AM
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Joined: 7/19/2014
Posts: 8
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1. "Film rights" the right to make a motion picture of something. In this ase it is what is called in the common law "the right of publicity." A person generally controls how he is depicted, with many exceptions. But motion picture companies, afraid of lawsuits, will generally purchase the right to film someone's life, instead of worrying about litigation later.

2. "really" in that sentence is simply an imprecise intensifier. It fuctions to give off this sense: "It's not surprising that he looks sane because in reality anyone would."

3. "The concept of novelty or individual creativeness is considered valuable by everyone but one encounters it less and less frequently, but we can offer you these [examples of originality]." I can't figure out what is being offered because a can't see the link you inserted.
Nousher Ahmed 1
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 3:21:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/2/2014
Posts: 396
Neurons: 2,417
Location: Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
dkf wrote:
1. "Film rights" the right to make a motion picture of something. In this ase it is what is called in the common law "the right of publicity." A person generally controls how he is depicted, with many exceptions. But motion picture companies, afraid of lawsuits, will generally purchase the right to film someone's life, instead of worrying about litigation later.

2. "really" in that sentence is simply an imprecise intensifier. It fuctions to give off this sense: "It's not surprising that he looks sane because in reality anyone would."

3. "The concept of novelty or individual creativeness is considered valuable by everyone but one encounters it less and less frequently, but we can offer you these [examples of originality]." I can't figure out what is being offered because a can't see the link you inserted.


So the first sentence means he (someone) had given permission to a certain film maker to make a film/movie based on his life, and in return he took money from that film maker. Am I right? But what does faked his own death mean?

And in third sentence, actually, ever prized does not make any sense. Can it be explained further?
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 4:16:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,848
Neurons: 24,556
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Nousher Ahmed 1 wrote:
1. My guess is that he sold the film rights to his life, faked his own death and lived happily ever after.

I coudn't figure out the meaning of film rights to his life, faked his own death. I would feel happy if anyone tells the meaning of it and rewrite these parts with other words.

2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would really.

What would most people really do? This sentence is not complete, and the omitted part has been mentioned before. But I cannot find which part that has been omitted has been mentioned before.

3. Originality, ever prized, is increasingly scarce, but we can offer you these.

I cannot understand this sentence at all. It would be helpful if experts of this forum rewrite it in an easier way, and explain it.

All these three sentences have been from this link. All this three sentences have a common word, ever.

Thanks in advance! Boo hoo!


Each of these are examples of humour; they are not intended to be understood literally.

Nousher Ahmed 1 wrote:
1. My guess is that he sold the film rights to his life, faked his own death and lived happily ever after.


The meaning is that a person created a fictional account of his life, sold that fiction to a production company, erased his identity, and enjoyed the profit without the liability of being blameworthy. Nice work, if you can get it ;^)

Quote:
2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would really.

Most people look crazy compared to Nick. Nick has the knack of appearing sane compared to most people.

Quote:
3. Originality, ever prized, is increasingly scarce, but we can offer you these.

This is truly cynical: instead of genuine originality, "we" can offer you trite conventions.


Edited to Add

Is this a grammar question, or a vocabulary question? Enquiring minds want to know…


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 4:46:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 14,894
Neurons: 58,937
Number 2 seems poorly punctuated , to me.

It does seem incomplete (he seems really what?) if you don't understand that 'really' is just a adverb relating to the whole phrase.

2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would.


2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would, really.

If you read it that way, then it becomes clearer that it is just omitting the repetition of the earlier phrase.

2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would [look relatively sane by comparison], really.

It's a bit illogical, as well. In the absence of context, you don't know what they are being compared with.



3 makes no sense without context.

'Originality' is an uncountable nouns, so it is treated as singular. Therefore 'these' refers to plural items or ideas that have been previously mentioned, or are being presented.



For a dictionary, I think these are poorly-chosen examples. They invite confusion from learners, when they should be a vehicle for clarifying the use of 'ever' in real examples.

leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 5:11:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,848
Neurons: 24,556
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
thar wrote:
Number 2 seems poorly punctuated , to me.

It does seem incomplete (he seems really what?) if you don't understand that 'really' is just a adverb relating to the whole phrase.

2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would.


2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would, really.

If you read it that way, then it becomes clearer that it is just omitting the repetition of the earlier phrase.

2. Nick, as ever, looks relatively sane by comparison, but then most people would [look relatively sane by comparison], really.

It's a bit illogical, as well. In the absence of context, you don't know what they are being compared with.



3 makes no sense without context.

'Originality' is an uncountable nouns, so it is treated as singular. Therefore 'these' refers to plural items or ideas that have been previously mentioned, or are being presented.



For a dictionary, I think these are poorly-chosen examples. They invite confusion from learners, when they should be a vehicle for clarifying the use of 'ever' in real examples.



Sorry thar, you often get it, but this time you missed.

This is not literal writing, but rather quite arch and cynical. It is intended to be slightly awry. I can't tell you why, yet I recognize when someone intentionally twists and warps the language like that.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 5:39:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 14,894
Neurons: 58,937
Yeah, but it screws with learners when it is a dictionary example!Whistle
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