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Correct punctuation Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 9:44:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
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The sentence is, "The knight is tall and handsome".

In British English, should there be a comma after "is" and should the full stop be inside the quotation marks instead?

Thanks.
You know who I am
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 10:03:04 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 593
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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Koh Elaine wrote:
The sentence is, "The knight is tall and handsome".

In British English, should there be a comma after "is" and should the full stop be inside the quotation marks instead?

Thanks.


Hi, Koh Elaine.

No, there should be no comma after the linking verb Is, regardless of what type of English it is. The quotation marks are subject complement of the linking verb Is. Subject complements can never be separated from its linking verb; it would be the same as separating one direct object from its verb, e.g: I want, that jacket.

Regarding the full stops, I'm curious about it.

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 1:25:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,115
Neurons: 64,545
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Are full stops placed inside or outside quotation marks?
by
Tim North, http://www.scribe.com.au


Consider the following sentence:

One meaning of vis-a-vis is "in relation to".

Should the full stop be inside the closing quotation mark or
outside it?

In US English, the full stop is usually placed inside the closing
quotation mark in this sentence. In British English, it is
usually placed outside.

This is just the tip of the iceberg, however. The placement of
punctuation relative to a closing quotation mark is surprisingly
complex. What's worse, the rules for US English are quite
different to those for British English.

Indeed, practices vary, not only between US and UK English but
within each group.

Brick wall Brick wall Brick wall Brick wall Brick wall

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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