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Non-finite and finite clauses Options
You know who I am
Posted: Saturday, March 11, 2017 9:29:59 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 444
Neurons: 3,584
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Hey guys. How are you doing?


I'd like you to check these sentences and help me identify it:



I don’t enjoy playing tennis in the rain.

I’d hate to travel to London every day.



What are the non-finite and finite verbs and the non-finite clauses and finite clauses?

I'm confused for non-finite verbs are normally the verbs inflected by the previous verb, so do "hate" and "enjoy" belong to the also non-finite verbs and non-finite clauses? I'm confused.

Would it be:

I don't = finite clause
enjoy playing tennis in the rain = non-finite clause

I would = finite clause
hate to travel to london every day = non-finite clause

?

Jesus, He is the way, the truth and the life, no one gets to the Father if not through Him.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, March 11, 2017 12:53:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 24,753
Neurons: 128,238
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I'm not sure, but I THINK you will get two different answers for this (at least) from two different "schools of grammar".
I can see the logic behind both.

1. My idea: The 'phrase' breakdown:

I don’t enjoy playing tennis in the rain.
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb-phrase: don't enjoy
non-finite (gerund): playing
object phrase: tennis
adverbial phrase: in the rain (modifies "playing tennis")

2. Another idea: The 'word' breakdown:
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb: auxiliary: do
adverb: not
infinitive: main verb: like
non-finite (gerund): playing
object phrase: tennis
adverbial phrase: in the rain (modifies "playing")

There is only one clause, and its verb is (of course) finite in both breakdowns.

************
I’d hate to travel to London every day. = I would hate to travel to London every day.

1.
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb-phrase: 'would hate' (subjunctive mood of 'hate')
infinitive phrase: noun phrase: 'to travel to London' - object of 'would hate'
adverbial phrase: adverb of time/frequency: 'every day' (modifies 'travel to London') (equivalent to 'daily')

2.
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb: 'would' - modal auxiliary
infinitive: 'hate'
infinitive: noun phrase: 'to travel' - object of 'hate'
prepositional phrase: adverbial phrase: to London (modifies 'travel')
adverbial phrase: adverb of time/frequency: 'every day' (equivalent to 'daily') (modifies 'travel')

In both 'breakdowns', there is only one finite verb, so only one clause in each. The whole sentence is the whole clause.

***************
"I don't" and "I would" are not clauses, as they don't have a predicate.

1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence. Collins English Dictionary.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
You know who I am
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 12:43:59 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 444
Neurons: 3,584
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I'm not sure, but I THINK you will get two different answers for this (at least) from two different "schools of grammar".
I can see the logic behind both.

1. My idea: The 'phrase' breakdown:

I don’t enjoy playing tennis in the rain.
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb-phrase: don't enjoy
non-finite (gerund): playing
object phrase: tennis
adverbial phrase: in the rain (modifies "playing tennis")

2. Another idea: The 'word' breakdown:
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb: auxiliary: do
adverb: not
infinitive: main verb: like
non-finite (gerund): playing
object phrase: tennis
adverbial phrase: in the rain (modifies "playing")

There is only one clause, and its verb is (of course) finite in both breakdowns.

************
I’d hate to travel to London every day. = I would hate to travel to London every day.

1.
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb-phrase: 'would hate' (subjunctive mood of 'hate')
infinitive phrase: noun phrase: 'to travel to London' - object of 'would hate'
adverbial phrase: adverb of time/frequency: 'every day' (modifies 'travel to London') (equivalent to 'daily')

2.
Subject pronoun: I
finite verb: 'would' - modal auxiliary
infinitive: 'hate'
infinitive: noun phrase: 'to travel' - object of 'hate'
prepositional phrase: adverbial phrase: to London (modifies 'travel')
adverbial phrase: adverb of time/frequency: 'every day' (equivalent to 'daily') (modifies 'travel')

In both 'breakdowns', there is only one finite verb, so only one clause in each. The whole sentence is the whole clause.

***************
"I don't" and "I would" are not clauses, as they don't have a predicate.

1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence. Collins English Dictionary.


Drag0n, most people agree with you on the first view point, and I do too.

So, a finite verb-phrase is a conjunct of verbs, auxiliaries, aspects and etc.. E.G.:

I must have been being delivered to Italia. Although it is a hard to-be-seen construction, I took it as example :P

I - Subject pronoun
Must have been being delivered = finite verb-phrase
to Italia - adverbial phrase of direction.

Now describing the verb phrase:

Must = modal auxiliary
Have been = auxiliary to form the perfect continuous tense
being = auxiliar to form the passive voice continuous
delivered = main verb in the third form.


Are the above examples correctly described?

Jesus, He is the way, the truth and the life, no one gets to the Father if not through Him.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 4:34:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 24,753
Neurons: 128,238
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!
Yes - your grammar breakdown is fine, as far as I can see - a modal, passive, progressive perfect!
That's about as complex as they come!

The one 'doubt' I have is simply the example you used, not really the grammar.

It would make a little more sense to use the modal passive continuous perfect with an adverbial of time, and a more specific place:

"Right at that second, it must have been being delivered to his house in Italy."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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