The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

largely/mainly/mostly Options
EnglishFanatic92
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 3:09:04 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 6/14/2016
Posts: 64
Neurons: 398

Hi all.


I have always looked up to Roger Federer, considered by many the best athlete in the world. The reason wasn´t my ambition to play tennis as well as he does. Mainly,Largely, Mostly, it was his motivation to work hard and give it everything he had got.


My teacher told me that the safest way to avoid making a mistake is to use "mainly". However she couldn´t tell me whether the other two are possible or not - in this context. :(

Thanks :)
thar
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 5:21:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,669
Neurons: 62,572
Mainly and mostly are pretty much the same, so you could use either
The main reason - mainly
The biggest reason - mostly

But largely doesn't fit in the sentence.


It can modify 'because'
Largely because of...
Mainly because of...
Mostly because of...

But here it is describing the how much of the reason it is. 'Largely' doesn't work. Maybe others can better explain why.
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 5:33:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,070
Neurons: 25,558
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
thar wrote:
Mainly and mostly are pretty much the same, so you could use either
The main reason - mainly
The biggest reason - mostly

But largely doesn't fit in the sentence.


It can modify 'because'
Largely because of...
Mainly because of...
Mostly because of...

But here it is describing the how much of the reason it is. 'Largely' doesn't work. Maybe others can better explain why.


I agree. To my ear, largely only works in those cases when there is a measurable difference, such as the results of a poll, or some other synonym for the majority of the time, most often, etc.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
NKM
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 6:59:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 3,892
Neurons: 168,904
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Primarily?
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 7:20:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 678
Neurons: 142,862
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
... it was his motivation to work hard and give it everything he had got.

Please remove "got" from the end of the sentence. It adds nothing and sounds clumsy and "common".
EnglishFanatic92
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 3:42:14 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 6/14/2016
Posts: 64
Neurons: 398
Really? "had got" is incorrect? I am really disappointed in my teacher then.
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 6:36:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 3,892
Neurons: 168,904
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Indeed, "had got" (in that sense) sounds quite strange to my American ear.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:29:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,731
Neurons: 144,933
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Also to my traditionally British ear.

In most sentences which contain "have got" or "had got". the 'got' is totally redundant.
It is used by many people, but is totally unnecessary in many sentences.

I have got a cat.
I have a cat.
Give it everything you have got.
Give it everything you have.

"Have" is a state-verb meaning 'to own' or 'to hold' (in this sense.
"Get" is really an active dynamic verb meaning 'to change from a state of not having to a state of having'.

Yesterday I got a new car (I changed from not having a car to having one).
Today I have a car (I own a car).


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.