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mocking ISIS Options
Yarin
Posted: Wednesday, February 08, 2017 4:39:02 PM
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Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, February 09, 2017 4:50:38 AM

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In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, February 09, 2017 6:46:37 AM
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almo 1
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2017 6:58:29 AM
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will
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2017 8:43:00 AM
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Ha, ha!

ISIS use fear, lies and propaganda to create a ‘clash of civilizations’ narrative. They cynically exploit xenophobia and bigotry to claim power endorsed by racial and religious superiority. Their leadership claim to be working for the general populace, but are in fact demagogues and power crazed fantasists whose only interest is their personal greed and self preservation. Their leadership is made up of people who believe ancient, pre-scientific, myths as literal truth.

Idiots! Whistle
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 7:13:12 AM
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Oh my God!



I'll be banned!






almo 1
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 9:13:37 AM
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Jeech
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 9:41:43 AM

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ISIS is a tool and the operators are considered the "chosen people". ISIS is another sociopolitical fraction in a certain territory designed to keep foreigner's hegemony over there.

Being invader seems to be a superlative version of civilization, I wonder! ISIS helps invaders to oppress the locals. ISIS is another name of "black-water".

I hope, US President Trump will roll back the red carpet of terrorists in the region with the help of Russian president Putin.

*It's wonderful to know that all languages are Greek if not understood.*
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 5:25:15 PM
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almo 1
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:42:48 AM
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Now this creature is getting super paranoid.







Yarin
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 7:02:28 PM
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"Since the beginning of that coalition, if you want to talk about facts, not opinion, since the beginning of that coalition (the UK, France, the US, Saudi Arabia and Qatar) , Isis has expanded and the recruiting from around the world has increased.

"While since the participation of Russia in the same fight, against terrorism, Isis has been shrinking."
Yarin
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 9:18:23 PM
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America's cowboy mentality.
almo 1
Posted: Friday, April 07, 2017 9:05:09 AM
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North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reportedly spent approximately $3.4 million in lingerie last year for his harem of women — many of them young teenage girls — nicknamed the “Pleasure Squad.”




2017/04/kim-jong-un-recruits-teenage-girls-for-pleasure-squad





Kinky Kim Thong-un
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 8:53:01 PM
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Are North Koreans fighting in Syria? It’s not as far-fetched as it sounds.

washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/03/25

***********

Reports that Pyongyang has sent pilots to Syria suggest the Damascus regime can no longer rely on its own airmen; ties precede current Syrian war, forms part of North Korea's broader network of relationship in Mideast.


Jerusalem Post/Assads-North-Korean-connection/November 2, 2013











almo 1
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 9:03:50 PM
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What was the chemical weapon behind the 'very painful' death of Kim Jong-un's half-brother, Kim Jong-nam?




www.rollingstone.com/culture/north-koreas-chemical-weapon




Siti Aishah, seen wearing her "LOL" shirt, is suspected in the murder of Kim Jong Nam.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 8:58:05 AM
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Knowing when to flinch

By Steve Tharp

The North Korean leadership has historically thrived on crisis and increased tensions with the outside and uses that tension to achieve both internal and external goals.
When I was serving as a U.N. Command negotiator meeting with the North Koreans at Panmunjom in the late 1990s, we had a simple "8-Step" do-loop process which described North Korean negotiating tactics with this dependence on tension and crises:
1) Cause the "appearance" of tension;
2) Blame South Korea and the U.S. for the tense situation;
3) Quickly agree "in principle" to a major improvement in relations. Steps4-7 described phases in the negotiations process and were intermediate steps:
4) Set artificial deadlines to pressure the other side;
5) Politicize and draw out negotiations front-loading the agenda and demanding preconditions (the preconditions are often the true objectives);
6) Blame South Korea and the U.S. for the protracted talks;
7) Demand compensation or major concession, before returning to the talks.
Step 8 "Go back to Step 1" created the do-loop quality in the process and was inserted whenever North Korea felt it necessary to restart. Over the years, it has been easier for me to understand North Korean behavior when I put it in the context of these steps. The essential point is that without a crisis, there cannot be a breakthrough.

Here is an example of this tactic from 2000 starting with a March 1st Nodong Shinmun article (Steps 1 and 2):

"Peace is mankind's common desire. The most dangerous reactionary force challenging the mankind's aspiration and desire to live in a peaceful world free of aggression and war is the imperialist force. The situation observed in the month of February once again clearly proved that it is impossible to think about the world peace and security without frustrating and breaking down the imperialists' aggression moves. Due to the imperialists' dominationist policy, tensions developed in many regions and countries around the world in February. The imperialists have also strengthened their interference in other countries. This is because it was in this region that the imperialists' aggression and war maneuvers are most persistently carried out and the tense situation in this region had the world worried. The United States, Japan, and the South Korean puppets were the main culprits."

After creating the necessary tension, the North had set the stage to reach a "dramatic" breakthrough. After several talks between South and North Korean leaders (the Southern team crossed secretly back and forth at Panmunjeom), the two sides agreed in April to a June 15 South-North summit. This "historic" June 15 Summit was held within 3 ½ months of the saber rattling and on the 1-year anniversary of the defeat of the north Korean People's Army navy at the first battle of Yeonpyeong. At the summit, many agreements were made in principle and there was a feeling that peace was finally at hand on the Korean Peninsula. Without going through the steps in detail, the bottom line is that this had all broken down by Oct. 30, 2001 when North Korea's media announced Step 8/Step 1:

"North Korea is fully prepared for any military challenges at a time when tension is mounting on the Korean Peninsula due to the United States' hostile polices against it…"

"The United States looks not to ease tension but to escalate it, increasing the danger of war on the Korean Peninsula."

The problem with this type of crisis diplomacy is that you must keep raising the level of the rhetoric in Steps 1 and 2 to get the appropriate reaction from the other side. In the five years since taking power Kim Jong-un has ratcheted up the rhetoric to higher and higher levels but still can't seem to get past Step 2 as the South Korean and the American governments are not taking the bait as in the past. On the contrary, the current ROK and U.S. leadership are responding with their own provocative responses while in close consultation with China and Japan.

The recent crisis created by North Korea have led some in the media to speculate that this is the most extreme tension since the end of the Korean War fighting. When the rhetoric gets extreme, as is currently the case, hyping it is a common media reaction, especially for the foreign media because of their lack of experience in Korea. This media hype can also encourage each side to continue raising the rhetoric levels, and hence raising the stakes in the game.

With neither side being willing to yield, the current situation seems analogous to "chicken," a game which involves a degree of danger and forces one side to flinch before the other. One version of this game involves 2 cars driving straight at each other on a road with the first one swerving (or flinching) being the "chicken" or coward. Flinching too late, however, brings injury or death and so the reasonable person will swerve to avoid catastrophe. If both opponents are unreasonable, the situation becomes dangerous.

Classic movie fans will remember when James Dean is forced to play a form of chicken in the 1955 movie "Rebel Without a Cause. He and another boy drive stolen cars toward the edge of a cliff with the rules being the first one to jump out of the car is the "chicken." In that instance, James Dean was the loser, the chicken, as he jumped first but he was also the survivor as the other boy's jacket caught on the door handle before he could jump and he perished as he rode the car over the cliff. With tensions remaining high, everyone hopes that the two sides will quickly find an exit ramp and avoid hostilities. A quote from the American submarine commander in the 1990 movie "The Hunt for Red October" sums up the problem very well. "The hard part about playing chicken is knowing when to flinch."

Steve Tharp is a retired U.S. Army officer who served 26 years with the U.S. military in Korea, to include six years as a U.N. Command negotiator at Panmunjeom. He is currently writing a series of DMZ tourism books. Write to daraemm@gmail.com

koreatimes.co.kr/www/opinion/2017/05/
almo 1
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 8:59:45 AM
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Tale of two patterns

By Michael Breen

The victory of Moon Jae-in in the presidential election last week was met with joyous relief both at home and abroad.
It was as if after months of going round in circles, the Korean ship finally had a captain on board and a firm hand back on the rudder.

Even North Korea joined in by calling for an end to animosity.

Now that we've savored this sunny Seoul spring moment, let me hand out a figurative handkerchief. Because, dear readers, this will end in tears.

Here's why. For anyone who has been around long enough, when you say the words "President" and "North Korea," two patterns come immediately to mind.

The first concerns negotiations with North Korea. The pattern for the last 30 years has been very consistent. It was well laid out in a recent column in this newspaper by Steve Tharp ("Knowing when to flinch," uploaded May 2), so I won't go into it again here. But the broad picture is: North Korea calls for talks, we agree, it argues over pre-conditions, we agree, we talk, it has a hissy fit, we make a concession, it has another spasm, walks out and starts doing target practice with its guns. The pattern has been interrupted in the last decade by our side's understandable lack of interest in talks. And now, as the North plays with its guns, the new policeman on the beat, Donald Trump, has called in a SWAT team.

That's where we were the night before Moon's victory. But the next day, North Korea called for talks. Here we go again. My guess is, after a summit, by late 2018, we will back at this point again.

There is logic to this cynicism. North Korea's leadership is stuck. This behavioral cycle is its only option.

The other pattern concerns the Korean presidency. Every democratically elected president ― Moon is the seventh in a row ― has started with high approval ratings.

At the inauguration, for example, the press widely applauded when the new president promised sweeping economic reforms to bridge the growing income gap and address youth unemployment as well as reduce the country's dependence on the chaebol. The president also said, "I urge North Korea to abandon its nuclear ambitions without delay and embark on the path to peace and shared development."

Actually, I just took those two sentences from a 2013 story in The Guardian about Park Geun-hye's inauguration. But they could apply to Moon. He is saying pretty much the same, but it all feels fresh and good, like the absence of yellow dust after rain.

But soon, the slow descent will start. Journalists writing about this will link lower approval to scandals or unpopular policies, as if it's the president's fault. They will miss the real culprit ― the people.

It's a more difficult story to get your head around, but the beloved people don't like leaders. I have a friend ― a Korean, I hasten to add, because what I am about to say shouldn't come out of the mouth of a foreigner ― who raises Jindo dogs and who recently told me this: "In a group of dogs, one will emerge as the leader and the others will accept him. But Jindos are different. The weaker dogs never accept the stronger and every so often will let him know. They're always fighting. We Koreans are like that, too."

Honest, I tried to report this anti-Korean pro-Jindo racist to the Thought Police, but they were all busy on Facebook.
Right now, Moon is like the star who scores the winning goal in the World Cup semi-final. But once he gets presidential, the knives will come out and he'll get blamed for everything.

If Moon can break the curse, God bless him. But if the pattern holds, five years from now he is going to be really unpopular.

A new twist is that he might not even make it to the end, because we have in Korea discovered a new weapon ― impeachment. Normally, a leader is impeached for treason, gross corruption or some such crime. In Korea, though, the risk after the Park Geun-hye case is that it will be used as a way to unseat someone for the crime of no longer enjoying full popular support.

Once public sentiment is on their side, his opponents will look for a pretext. Actually, believe it or not, this idea is already doing the rounds online among some supporters of some of the candidates he beat.

Perhaps the solution for a leader with regard to this pattern number one is to solve pattern number two. If that North Korea pattern breaks and reconciliation happens under his watch, Moon will break the curse and forever be a hero.

koreatimes.co.kr/www/opinion/2017/05/
Yarin
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 6:28:34 PM
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Meet the real terrorists and haters of freedom!





Yarin
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 7:51:33 PM
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