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Did you bring vs have you brought Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 7:15:30 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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One of the duties as a ward-based Pharmacy Technician is to take drug history.
When talking to the patient which one is correct?:
Did you bring any medications with you
Vs
Have you brought any medications?
Please explain the answer in detail.
Thanks
Jignesh
thar
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 7:25:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 14,894
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What does your gut feeling tell you?
What pattern does it seem to match?
You are probably right!

You can look at this in two ways.
1
It is a past action which is complete - something you did.
To bring something is a finite action. It finishes when you arrive with it.

I brought my medications.
Did you bring your medications?

or,

2
It is a past action which is relevant to the present.
I have brought my medications with me - that is why I can show them to you now.
The present situation is what is most relevant.

But, in this situation, nothing will have changed from that time in the past. If you brought your medications, then they are still here with you. There is really no option for anything else to have happened between the time you arrived in the hospital and the time you are seen by this member of staff.

So both options give the same meaning. Both are fine.
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:48:18 PM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 2,142
Thanks
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:26:02 PM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
I expect that what you'll hear most often is "Did you bring your medications with you?" Or, "Did you bring any medication with you?"
In my neck of the woods, it would actually be slightly different, as in "Did you bring your medicine with you?"

Romany
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:31:22 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Wilmar -

That's really surprising: that's how it's mostly said here, too. I'd thought it was an AE/BE thing. Which just goes to show wrong one can be!

Though we do use the plural when we shorten it, viz: "Did you bring your meds. with you?" Do you guys also do that?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 4:03:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
There are a few cases in which two tenses end up actually meaning exactly the same thing (though there may be a little difference in emphasis between them) - today's grammar lesson mentions that the future perfect and the future perfect continuous are like this, too.

***********
I thought 'medications' was used as a euphemism for 'drugs', because 'drugs' has a rather negative connotation, being connected with illegal street-drugs.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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