The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

propensity of nature Options
vkhu
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 5:11:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/18/2012
Posts: 573
Neurons: 3,857
"[...] my inclination to this led me so strongly against the will, nay, the commands of my father, and against all the entreaties and persuasions of my mother and other friends, that there seemed to be something fatal in that propensity of nature, tending directly to the life of misery which was to befall me."

What does "propensity of nature" mean? Does it refer to the tendency of the character, or the act of going out at sea?

Source: Robinson Crusoe
pjharvey
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 6:28:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/13/2012
Posts: 752
Neurons: 42,267
It refers to the propensity of his nature (Robinson's) not to follow his parents' and friends' advice, but, on the contrary, to...
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 7:01:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,919
Neurons: 136,883
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Gosh!

I had forgotten how foreign Defoe's writing really sounds.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 7:26:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 618
Neurons: 139,587
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I had forgotten how foreign Defoe's writing really sounds.

I thought it was a little eloquent but still English. Reading this book can not be detrimental to your English, can it?

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 7:38:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,919
Neurons: 136,883
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Harben!

It would not be detrimental to one's English grammar studies, I don't suppose.

However, for someone trying to learn English for use in 2017 - someone who asks "Does this sentence sound natural?" it does not do any good to learn phrases such as Daniel Defoe uses.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Gary98
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 9:30:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/23/2014
Posts: 1,583
Neurons: 2,010,983
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Probably less than half native English speakers enjoy this kind of complex sentence.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 9:34:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,919
Neurons: 136,883
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Gary98 wrote:
Probably less than half native English speakers enjoy this kind of complex sentence.

I would guess that it's a lot less than half.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Gary98
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 11:23:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/23/2014
Posts: 1,583
Neurons: 2,010,983
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Enjoy is the wrong word here. In spoken English people use simple, direct sentence to express themselves. When I first started speaking English daily in the U. S. I could not seem to find a sentence without "that" or "which" in it.

Who does not enjoy great prose and eloquence?
Gary98
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 11:31:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/23/2014
Posts: 1,583
Neurons: 2,010,983
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Still like Defoe's statement about "the middle station of life" very much. Quite bored by his long list of stuff he has got. Turned many pages forward to see the next action scene.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.