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they --> day Options
Fruity
Posted: Thursday, March 09, 2017 10:15:08 AM

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Joined: 5/23/2014
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Location: Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa, Japan
This liverpool woman pronounced "they" as "day." I wonder how she pronounces "day."

♥ Get into the habit of considering the feelings of others before you react to circumstances around you. ♥
IMcRout
Posted: Thursday, March 09, 2017 10:50:34 AM

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Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Like 'die', of course. Whistle

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, March 09, 2017 11:39:55 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
The English language is feeling depressed and ashamed as adolescents mobile users have invented a new obnoxious and deplorable dialect. It's condemnable and harmful attitude.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Thursday, March 09, 2017 2:21:08 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Well,perhaps that's true, but actually that isn't what Fruity is exploring, AshwinJ.

She's talking about English dialect and, in this case, it's the Scouse dialect. None of our dialects are new - they go back over a thousand years and we actually treasure them! You may have seen that we've had quite a few discussions about dialect and its place in English recently?

My father could speak Scouse, while my mother would revert at times to Irish - and actually the pronunciation is very much the same. (Liverpool used to be the port that the Irish would land in and many stayed.). However the syntax and vocabulary are very different. So, when they did play about speaking in dialect, neither could understand the other!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 3:05:23 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Ashwin Joshi wrote:
The English language is feeling depressed...


How can a language feel depressed?


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 3:06:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,189
Neurons: 131,106
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes, Scouse is a real mixture.

Lancashire and Irish are the basis, but Danish, Norwegian and Swedish have a big influence.
The word "scouse" itself is Norwegian.
It is very different from Irish.

I read an article many years ago (The Times, I think) which said that the 'nasal' quality was left over from the early days of Liverpool as a port, when the weather and the constant 'come and go' of sailors meant that everyone had a cold almost constantly.

*************
"They" and "day" sound almost identical ( /deɪ/ or /de/ or /də/ depending on the stress pattern of the sentence) - but I can't think of any circumstance in which they would be misunderstood.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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