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almo 1
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:15:48 PM
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Autobahn



Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, February 26, 2017 8:34:06 AM

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Drag0n,

kumarreksituteskenteleentuvaisehkollaismaisekkuudellisenneskenteluttelemattomammuuksissansakaankopahan
has 102 letters, grammatically correct, but not a single Finn ever says that ;-)

The longest actually used Finnish word is lentokonesuihkuturbiinimoottoriapumekaanikkoaliupseerioppilas.
"airplane jet turbine engine auxiliary mechanic non-commissioned officer student"

and still in use:

peruspalveluliikelaitoskuntayhtymä
"a public utility of a municipal federation for provision of basic services"


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, February 26, 2017 8:59:24 AM
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fartkontrol



I thought it was a German word, but it was not.





almo 1
Posted: Sunday, February 26, 2017 12:18:24 PM
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SERVUS (Service?)






In Robert Heinlein's novel "Methuselah's Children",

Mary says, "I must run now. Service, Ven."
when she is supposed to say "I must run now. See you later, Ven."



I realized later that "service" means "greetings" in south region of Germany.


IMcRout
Posted: Sunday, February 26, 2017 3:43:13 PM

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Servus is indeed used in Southern Germany and Austria in the meaning of 'Hello' or 'Goodbye'. You will not find the word 'service' with that meaning, however.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
coag
Posted: Monday, February 27, 2017 12:06:20 AM

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I've heard "servus", or "serbus", in Croatian, too.

I would like to add, to IMcRout's comments, the following information from Wikipedia.

"Servus" can be interpreted as "at your service".
It's a short of the Latin expression servus humillimus, domine spectabilis = [your] most humble servant, [my] noble lord.

"Use of this salute is roughly coincident with the boundaries of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. It is especially popular in Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Romania (mostly in Transylvania), as well as in southern parts of Germany (Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Palatinate, middle and southern Hesse), northern Croatia, eastern Slovenia (mostly in Slovenian Styria), and western Ukraine. It may be rarely used in Czech Republic and Poland (where it is considered an archaism, not used in common speech). The word may be used as a greeting, a parting salutation, or as both, depending on the region and context.[1]

Despite its formal origins, "servus" is now used as an informal salute in Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Austria, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.[1]"
Kunstniete
Posted: Monday, February 27, 2017 2:47:34 AM

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coag wrote:
Despite its formal origins, "servus" is now used as an informal salute in Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Austria, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.[1]"


That's right, but every time I hear someone use this greeting I feel quite uneasy, since Servus is originally Latin for Slave. Of course it's not used within this meaning nowadays, but imagine yourself in a situation where someone greets you that way, even if s/he doesn't know about its original meaning.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, February 27, 2017 5:57:18 AM

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Very formal, some time ago (Romany can probably pinpoint it, if no-one else can) there was an English phrase "At your service, sir" salutation.
It's not a phrase I've ever heard used - it 'sounds' nineteenth century to me, but that's a guess.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 27, 2017 6:52:22 AM

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Found in Everything2, German language oddities:


"Pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen, pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen."

Now this one confuses even native speakers of German. Let's try to take it apart till it makes "sense", yes? First off, "Pflanzen" means "plants", as in the plural of "plant".

The word "pflanzen", with a lower case p at the start, means something different: "to plant" - the verb. Also, the first "Pflanzen" in the sentence is actually a "pflanzen", but it's capitalised because it's at the beginning of the sentence. So you see, there are two verbs and six nouns in the sentence. Now let's see what it actually means translated into English.

"If plants plant plants for other plants, then plants plant plants for other plants."



Many of you might know what the American English sentence "Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo" means. ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Kunstniete
Posted: Monday, February 27, 2017 6:56:09 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Found in Everything2, German language oddities:


"Pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen, pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen Pflanzen."

Now this one confuses even native speakers of German. Let's try to take it apart till it makes "sense", yes? First off, "Pflanzen" means "plants", as in the plural of "plant".

The word "pflanzen", with a lower case p at the start, means something different: "to plant" - the verb. Also, the first "Pflanzen" in the sentence is actually a "pflanzen", but it's capitalised because it's at the beginning of the sentence. So you see, there are two verbs and six nouns in the sentence. Now let's see what it actually means translated into English.

"If plants plant plants for other plants, then plants plant plants for other plants."



Wow, I never heard that one but when I read it I got totally confused. Thanks for the very nice explanation Applause

I just found out, that Jurist is also a germanism
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2017 8:30:12 AM

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Kunstniete wrote:
I just found out, that Jurist is also a germanism

Oy vey ist mir!

I thought it was Latin!

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, March 01, 2017 2:06:39 PM
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coag wrote:


Despite its formal origins, "servus" is now used as an informal salute in Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Austria, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.[1]"







A lady from Bavaria:




I'm Calling You









Kunstniete
Posted: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 1:53:07 AM

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Schnitzel & Edelweiß / Edelweiss



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