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Lighted lamp Options
Untergang
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 7:22:11 AM
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Hi,

I have a question about lighted lamps. I am confused about the verb "light". In the case of lamps is this only means "to ignite with fire" or it can be "to turn on an electric lamp."
So basically my question is, could a "lighted lamp" be an electric lamp or is it always an oil lamp (or something similiar)?

FounDit
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 10:35:40 AM

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Untergang wrote:
Hi,

I have a question about lighted lamps. I am confused about the verb "light". In the case of lamps is this only means "to ignite with fire" or it can be "to turn on an electric lamp."
So basically my question is, could a "lighted lamp" be an electric lamp or is it always an oil lamp (or something similiar)?



I think a "lighted lamp" could be either one. Referring to it this way is probably a hold-over from previous generations when lamps used oil. But today most all our lamps in our homes and in cities would be electric. The exception might be if one is camping, and then the lamps would likely be lighted with gas.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 11:40:36 AM

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Lighted bulb or lighted lamp conveys the same connotation.

'Lighted', here, is a sort of action that enlivens a dormant thing. Here electrical switch or the matchstick both light up means help illumination and emission of the light from the bulb or the wick of the lamp.


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 2:04:05 PM

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I agree.

An electric lamp is lit or lighted.

This is not a distinction you often notice often (because the effect is the same), but the two participles/adjectives are slightly different, I think.

As a verb simple past, they usually work the same.
He lit the lamp. This is most common.
He lighted the lamp.

As a past participle/adjective, they are the opposite.
He picked up the lit lamp. uncommon, but correct, according to the American Heritage. He picked up the lamp which was glowing.
He picked up the lighted lamp. more common. He picked up the lamp which had been made to glow (switched on or set alight).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 2:37:48 PM
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I have noticed, over the past couple of years, that Americans are now tending to say "He lit it on fire" instead of "He set it on fire." In fact, that appears to be the default usage now in AE?
Untergang
Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2017 11:23:19 AM
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Thank you for the answers.
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2017 11:32:46 AM

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Location: St. Louis, Missouri, United States
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