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Why Age Cannot Wither her? Options
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 11:22:30 AM

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Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, 1606:

Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety.

I say 'Age doesn't spare any human'.
Think

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 12:59:44 PM
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Ah, I fear you are a pragmatist, Ashwin!

Shakespeare's language is meant to be grandiloquent - Drama in Early Modern England had to be dramatic. Without the media input of constant drama live as it happens etc. this was the only form of exciting the imagination. So they used a lot of poetic hyperbole.

Many people, even at that time time, had heard stories of Cleopatra. And all that they really knew about her was that she was so beautiful even the mighty Julius Caesar fell under her spell. So the speech is just a very high-flown way of saying she was quite a looker.

When we use the line in the poems that were quoted on the "Unknown Soldier" thread, of course, we are speaking about the dead. And the reason that age will never with them is, of course, because they are dead.
Gary98
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 2:25:14 PM

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No age can ever wither Mother Teresa.
redgriffin
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:24:11 PM

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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, 1606:

Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety.

I say 'Age doesn't spare any human'.
Think


Unless they are dead. While Romany is right that Cleopatra was by all accounts a looker when she took on The Romans we will neverf see her in old age because she died young.
Parpar1836
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 7:54:58 PM
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Also, in "Antony and Cleopatra," Enobarbus, Antony's friend who utters that immortal remark about age and custom, delivers a most gorgeously romantic passage (in Act 2, Scene 2, a bit before the line discussed above): "The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne/Burned on the water . . ." The effect is heightened by giving the description of the barge journey to Enobarbus, a dour, prosaic, unemotional sort of chap. Shakespeare adapted this passage from North's translation of Plutarch, but heightened and enriched the language.

Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2017 9:52:35 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Romany wrote;

Ah, I fear you are a pragmatist, Ashwin!

Yes Romany, but no fear, I am perfectly pragmatist(pragmatic?) having a scientific bent of mind.

But I got the answer to my query.Thanks.


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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