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What are you reading? Options
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 11:51:46 AM

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Andrew Schultz wrote:
I finished Sherman Alexie's Diary of a Part-Time Indian. I read it because it was on a banned books list.
At the end was a list of resources of a lot of other banned books by authors I'd always sort of wanted to read. This'll be fun.

Banned?

I thought that the banning of books ended in the 1960s when Lady Chatterly's Lover was allowed and Pope Paul cancelled the Index Librorum Prohibitorum!

You mean that The Land Of The Free proscribes what can be read?

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 12:56:40 PM

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I was moved by a quote from a novel by Lucy Maude Montgomery to find and read the series begun by Anne of Green Gables. I am reading the entire series as I can get my hands on them. They make great, gentle bedtime reading! Applause

This is my only now.
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 1:00:57 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Banned?

I thought that the banning of books ended in the 1960s when Lady Chatterly's Lover was allowed and Pope Paul cancelled the Index Librorum Prohibitorum!

You mean that The Land Of The Free proscribes what can be read?


http://www.ala.org/bbooks/


This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 2:15:11 PM

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I will never lose my amazement at the hypocrisy.

I assume some lawyer decided that books do not fit under 'press'.

Quote:
The First Amendment of the United States Constitution declares, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government . . ."




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2016 9:17:44 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I will never lose my amazement at the hypocrisy.

I assume some lawyer decided that books do not fit under 'press'.

Quote:
The First Amendment of the United States Constitution declares, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government . . ."




If you think that is an amazing document, try reading the constitution of the U. S. S. R. It's amazing. Ours is a piker compared to it.

Of course they are both more honored in the breach than in the keeping, these days. Not talking

This is my only now.
progpen
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 6:26:25 PM

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My fun reads have been the Doctor Who books. I'm following the 8th Doctor and am at Vanderdeken's Children.

My classic reads have been all over the place. I've been reading H.G. Wells, but just finished Jules Verne's Around the World in 80 Days and am reading Journey to the Center of the Earth.

My next classic series will be Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, which I haven't read since high school.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
MelissaMe
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 6:33:42 PM

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Doctor Who books? I'm in trouble! Anxious

BBC USA just ran a 24-hour a day marathon leading up to the Christmas special. Wowies! I watched several.

Ah, Stars' End! Well I remember that. The Foundation series, that is.

This is my only now.
progpen
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 6:40:20 PM

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Just for you MelissaMe. Enough to keep you busy for decades. The Doctor Who TV series (NuWho) is great but I've always liked the books and audio much better.
http://www.timelash.com/tardis/
https://www.bigfinish.com/


Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
MelissaMe
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 7:07:49 PM

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progpen wrote:
Just for you MelissaMe. Enough to keep you busy for decades. The Doctor Who TV series (NuWho) is great but I've always liked the books and audio much better.
http://www.timelash.com/tardis/
https://www.bigfinish.com/


Alex Kingston does the voice? How can I possibly resist??? Applause She's great!!!

This is my only now.
progpen
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 7:20:51 PM

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Alex Kingston (River Song), is one of my favorite characters. She is wonderful on the TV show and in the Audio.

Hello Sweetie.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
MelissaMe
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 8:32:05 PM

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progpen wrote:
Alex Kingston (River Song), is one of my favorite characters. She is wonderful on the TV show and in the Audio.

Hello Sweetie.


I will have to see what my new local library can get. Pray

This is my only now.
a.nnjka
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2016 6:27:51 PM

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Currently, I am reading Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. The book inclines me to really think about what is going on, as H.H. is an unreliable narrator and he attempts to mislead us, the readers, lol. Also, the use of language is amazing and English wasn't even Nabokov's first...Applause I have learned quite a bit new words from it which, all of this, I like.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, December 29, 2016 5:05:00 AM

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a.nnjka wrote:
Currently, I am reading Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. The book inclines me to really think about what is going on, as H.H. is an unreliable narrator and he attempts to mislead us, the readers, lol. Also, the use of language is amazing and English wasn't even Nabokov's first...Applause I have learned quite a bit new words from it which, all of this, I like.

Yes, though it was banned for a few years as 'pornographic', it is a well-written book and makes one think.
Apparently Nabokov himself was not going to publish it. It was his wife who insisted.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
FrankByMonster
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2017 7:52:55 AM
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I've just finished reading the last Harry Potter book. I decided to re-read it to remind my childhood. I like this magic world
progpen
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2017 8:43:33 AM

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FrankByMonster wrote:
I've just finished reading the last Harry Potter book. I decided to re-read it to remind my childhood. I like this magic world


I have never read them and have purposely not watched the movies until I do read them. I have just received "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and will be reading that one soon.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, January 23, 2017 9:50:48 AM

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progpen wrote:
I have never read them and have purposely not watched the movies until I do read them. I have just received "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and will be reading that one soon.

You really should read the first one when you are twelve or thirteen, the second one about a year later, and so on. So you should wait till your twelfth birthday. Whistle Whistle

The style of writing, the subject matter (or rather, how it is addressed) all become "older" as the series progresses.

If it's too late for your twelfth birthday, read them in sequence anyway. Anxious

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
progpen
Posted: Monday, January 23, 2017 10:02:48 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
progpen wrote:
I have never read them and have purposely not watched the movies until I do read them. I have just received "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and will be reading that one soon.

You really should read the first one when you are twelve or thirteen, the second one about a year later, and so on. So you should wait till your twelfth birthday. Whistle Whistle

The style of writing, the subject matter (or rather, how it is addressed) all become "older" as the series progresses.

If it's too late for your twelfth birthday, read them in sequence anyway. Anxious


Thank you Drago! My early teens are but a patchwork of faded memories, however, my youngest son read the books at the correct stages of life and I vicariously enjoyed them through our talks about the books. Even that has been a while ago, so I'm ready to experience them through my own emotional filters.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 9:32:23 PM
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I cannot concentrate on reading one book continuously these days.
Sometimes I read this book and sometimes read other books when I feel like to, and since I read mostly on Epub I occasionally visit TFD forum as well as twitter which ruins my concentration on reding a book, but that's OK.


Easy Riders, Raging Bulls by Peter Biskind


quote: "The first wave, comprised of white men born in the mid- to late ’30s (occasionally earlier), included Peter Bogdanovich, Francis Coppola, Warren Beatty, Stanley Kubrick, Dennis Hopper, Mike Nichols, Woody Allen, Bob Fosse, Robert Benton, Arthur Penn, John Cassavetes, Alan Pakula, Paul Mazursky, Bob Rafelson, Hal Ashby, William Friedkin, Robert Altman, and Richard Lester. The second wave was made up of the early boomers, born during and (mostly) after World War II, the film school generation, the so-called movie brats. This group included Scorsese, Spielberg, George Lucas, John Milius, Paul Schrader, Brian De Palma, and Terrence Malick.

When all was said and done, these directors created a body of work that included, in addition to the titles mentioned above, The Last Detail; Nashville; Faces; Shampoo; A Clockwork Orange; Reds; Paper Moon; The Exorcist; The Godfather, Part II; Mean Streets; Badlands; The Conversation; Taxi Driver; Raging Bull; Apocalypse Now; Jaws; Cabaret; Klute; Carnal Knowledge; American Graffiti; Days of Heaven; Blue Collar; All That Jazz; Annie Hall; Manhattan; Carrie; All the President’s Men; Coming Home; and Star Wars." unquote
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 8:58:47 AM
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I was curious about this book.

100 People Who Are Screwing Up America


"I'M SITTING ON A JET PLANE at Newark Airport, minding my own business, waiting to take off for Miami. A few seats away is this lawyer right out of Central Casting—

wire-framed eyeglasses, dull gray suit, red tie, mandatory suspenders. Attached to his ear is another mandatory accessory, the cell phone, which he's using to talk to a colleague about some legal brief.

Actually, "talk" isn't exactly the right word. "Yell" is a lot more like it—which is the way a lot of people "talk" on cell phones. Anyway, just about everyone on the plane who isn't clinically deaf can hear the whole conversation, loud and clear, including the part where Mr. Lawyer actually invokes the name of a U.S. Supreme Court justice—Antonin Scalia—to give a little weight to his brief. Pretty impressive, I'm thinking. I mean, how often does a guy on an airplane drop Antonin Scalia's name into a conversation? How about never? Then this obviously well-educated, sophisticated man makes another important observation about his important legal case, another observation you could hear all over the airplane.

"It's all f * * ked up," he tells the guy at the other end of the phone.

And here's the thing: No one within earshot raised an eyebrow. The remark drew as much attention as if he had said to the flight attendant, "Got any peanuts?"

Not that I'm suggesting that I was shocked, either. Who are we kidding? In today's world, some anonymous guy dropping the F-bomb in a crowded airplane doesn't move the needle on the give-a-crap meter. In fact, if you even think about making an issue of it, some people start dropping the P-bomb. And who wants to be called a prude? So you just sit there and either make believe you didn't hear what you and everybody else just heard or you tell your-self it's no big deal.

But the truth is, it's getting harder and harder to tell myself that stuff like this is no big deal. Instead I find myself remembering that there was a time in America when not even a drunk in a bar would say the word "f * * k" out loud. Today, Chevy Chase calls the president of the United States a "dumb f * * k"—not in some dingy beer hall but in front of a packed house at a Kennedy Center gala in Washington, D.C.

Yes, we've come a long way from the old days when "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn" caused such a ruckus. But that, of course, was a different time, and a different America, long before genuine crass vulgarity polluted not only our relatively private lives but our public, civic lives as well. "


Dreamy
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 9:33:32 PM

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Testing. 123 Testing.

Password still good.

Forum still here.

Sweet as!


Reading about 100 People in the USA and all the swearing...

Good post by almo 1.

almo 1 wrote:
"But that, of course, was a different time, and a different America, long before genuine crass vulgarity polluted not only our relatively private lives but our public, civic lives as well."


I remember doing some research on the use of profanity and abusive language some years ago prior to sacking an employee for just that.

I discovered that far from being an unjustified cause of dismissal as was suggested, statistics at the time had it as the number one cause of dismissal worldwide.

Something to ponder...




Job 33:15 "In a dream, in a vision of the night, When deep sleep falls upon men, In slumberings upon the bed;" Theology 101 "If He doesn't know everything then He isn't God."
kitman
Posted: Monday, February 06, 2017 4:05:35 AM
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Just reading Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow

With a dramatic sweep worthy of its subject, this is a magisterial work from an elegant storyteller.
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 12:22:41 AM

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The Lure of the Limerick

My mother passed away late last year and I was going through her library, this book took me back to the 70's.

The Lure was a common coffee table book at that time.

Many of the limericks are from the 1700's and ranks from nursery to naughty.

A rare old bird is the pelican;
His bill can hold more than his belican.
He can take in his beak
Enough food for a week;
I'm darned if I know how the helican!

or

In the Garden of Eden lay Adam
Complacently stroking his madam,
And loud was his mirth
For he knew that on Earth
There were only two balls--and he had 'em


Well it was the 70's.





almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 2:15:47 AM
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almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 8:35:27 PM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan

Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein








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