The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

To act with doubleness towards a man whose own conduct was double, was so near an approach to virtue that it deserved to be... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 19,665
Neurons: 58,998
Location: Inside Farlex computers
To act with doubleness towards a man whose own conduct was double, was so near an approach to virtue that it deserved to be called by no meaner name than diplomacy.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, February 11, 2017 3:06:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 355
Neurons: 1,503,987
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
George Eliot/Quotes

It is never too late to be what you might have been.

Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love.

Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact.

Blessed is the influence of one true, loving human soul on another.

An election is coming. Universal peace is declared, and the foxes have a sincere interest in prolonging the lives of the poultry.

Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.

Jealousy is never satisfied with anything short of an omniscience that would detect the subtlest fold of the heart.

Gossip is a sort of smoke that comes from the dirty tobacco-pipes of of those who diffuse it: it proves nothing but the bad taste of the smoker.

Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

A difference of taste in jokes is a great strain on the affections.
Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, February 11, 2017 5:03:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 1,988
Neurons: 101,394
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
To act with doubleness towards a man whose own conduct was double, was so near an approach to virtue that it deserved to be called by no meaner name than diplomacy.

George Eliot (1819-1880)


Yeah, it must be exciting - like waltzing on a minefield...
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:35:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 4,792
Neurons: 3,011,557
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from: Felix Holt the Radical

Chapter 29

‘I doe believe that, as the gall has several receptacles in several creatures, soe there’s scarce any creature but hath that emunctorye somewhere.’ — SIR THOMAS BROWNE.


It was not this motive, however, but rather the ordinary course of business, which accounted for Johnson’s playing a double part as an electioneering agent. What men do in elections is not to be classed either among sins or marks of grace: it would be profane to include business in religion, and conscience refers to failure, not to success. Still, the sense of being galled by Jermyn’s harness was an additional reason for cultivating all relations that were independent of him; and pique at Harold Transome’s behaviour to him in Jermyn’s office perhaps gave all the more zest to Johnson’s use of his pen and ink when he wrote a handbill in the service of Garstin, and Garstin’s incomparable agent, Putty, full of innuendoes against Harold Transome, as a descendant of the Durfey–Transomes. It is a natural subject of self-congratulation to a man, when special knowledge, gained long ago without any forecast, turns out to afford a special inspiration in the present; and Johnson felt a new pleasure in the consciousness that he of all people in the world next to Jermyn had the most intimate knowledge of the Transome affairs. Still better — some of these affairs were secrets of Jermyn’s. If in an uncomplimentary spirit he might have been called Jermyn’s ‘man of straw’, it was a satisfaction to know that the unreality of the man John Johnson was confined to his appearance in annuity deeds, and that elsewhere he was solid, locomotive, and capable of remembering anything for his own pleasure and benefit. To act with doubleness towards a man whose own conduct was double, was so near an approach to virtue that it deserved to be called by no meaner name than diplomacy.

Read more:https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/e/eliot/george/e42f/chapter29.html
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.