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Hip replacement recovery Options
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 10:44:07 AM
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I know someone who has just had his hip replaced (after tripping and breaking it).

He is a senior citizen (aka "old person").

In the United States, hospitals kick out "hip patients" in three days.

Then one has a choice:

a. recover at an institution that is set up to help one recover well enough before returning home.
b. recover at home (along with visiting therapists).

He is currently feeling blue.

If you know anyone who has had hip surgery, did that person ever succeed in returning to his/her normal routine (without a walker or cane)?

How long did it take that person to recover?


Thank you
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 11:10:51 AM

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I know someone who had hip replacement after a fall (ie, not planned) - out of hospital in a week or so with crutches, then a stick, and back to pretty much normal within two or three months. And he was in his late eighties, and not particularly fit.
He has a bit of trouble getting about but that is due to old knee injury, not the hip. I don't think it is still an issue with him.

He was probably not that enthusiastic about doing his physio, but he did it - a few simple exercises he had been taught by the physiotherapist in hospital, and rules about what not to do, like bend over too far.
We moved an adjustable bed downstairs for him, and his family got a raised toilet seat (luckily have a downstairs loo), and family looked after him for a week or two, but after that he was fine to look after himself. Now back upstairs, and drives, works outside, etc.

It can be done, to return to what appears to be full function.

Three days seems a very short time to be in some sort of care. He had time to recover from the surgery and have a few sessions with the hospital physio department and was walking with crutches before he was allowed to leave.

There must be lots of variables, and individual outcomes. But it can be done - absolutely. And in what seems like a very short time.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 11:11:00 AM

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I have a friend who had both hips replaced (this was due to long-term arthritic problems, not accident). She could 'get around' (though not too well) within a day or two of each operation.

I don't know exactly how old, but she has children in their thirties, so I'd guess she's in her fifties.

She was walking after the first one was replaced within two weeks (better than she had done in years).
The second was done six weeks after the first, and she was walking - with a walking stick - two weeks after that operation and was walking naturally without a limp (for the first time in about twelve years) within five weeks of the second operation.
She was back at work (which requires a lot of sitting and some walking) three weeks after the second operation (she couldn't stand sitting at home doing nothing!)

This was a National Health action, no special private treatment, just normal everyday medicine.

***********
What she told me was that it was just a matter of the wound healing - the actual surgical cut.

The new joint was fully fitted during the operation, and worked perfectly as soon as she came round from the anaesthetic. It was clipped to the remaining bones, so did not need to heal like a broken leg.
Once the healing of the cut was in progress, it was just a matter of exercises to get used to walking properly after years of hobbling about.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
towan52
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 2:29:29 PM

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Unfortunately, I am all too familiar with hip replacement. I had my right hip replaced about three years ago (arthritis and wear and tear). The surgeon drilled down into the femur, installed an implant with a porcelain ball and receptor set in the bone cup. Aside from wound discomfort etc. I was immediately suffering less pain. Not being able to put weight on the affected leg for a couple of weeks was a nuisance but I followed the intensive rehab instructions and followed up with the recommended exercises. I was back at work within seven weeks in far better shape than I was before. Recovery depends on the age of the patient, the level of fitness prior to the procedure, the willingness to follow the rehab regime and to do the recommended exercises for about 2/3 months.

For me though, the upper part of the implant failed after less than three years and about 3 months ago I had "revision" surgery and am now left with an "unstable hip" which requires a certain amount of care and planning with certain activities. leg exercises will hopefully strengthen and tighten the muscles around the implant and improve my quality of life.

The best advice is to follow the guidance of the surgeon and the therapists. If one ignores this advice then full recovery is highly unlikely. Whining about exercises being difficult or painful is common but "it is what it is" so get over it! There is no "easy path", and the more effort the patient puts in, the better the recovery will be.

With best wishes from "limping slightly" in Texas

"Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint."
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 2:46:43 PM

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Sorry to hear you are having complications now, Towan, even though you followed the proper regime. We have had many friends with hip and knee replacements that have worked out well. Usually after a couple of months of doing their exercises etc., they were back to walking on their own. However, none of them had broken it first, so I expect he should go by what his personal doctor tells him. I imagine it would be depressing, but I've heard, as you say,Towan, that one's only recourse is to follow the regime set by the doctor.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 3:24:04 PM

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I also had total hip replacement surgery which required 46 staples. My surgery was 5 yrs ago. I was in intensive care for 3 days because my blood pressure dropped to 25 over 75...dangerously low. I had given 2 pints of blood prior to surgery, a day before, if I required it, which I did. After 6 days, I was sent to a rehab facility for 6 weeks, followed up by rehab at home for 2 months, which was required by my doctor....it was hard to learn to walk again and climb stairs, but thank God, I left the facility with just a cane...I was 63. It is a less painful surgery than knee replacement, I've been told. Other than my knee, I'm ok.

My minister had hip replacement...right hip and 6 months later the left hip. He is 50, didn't require rehab, went back to the pulpit (sitting on a high stool) after 6 weeks of each surgery. Everybody is different.

I'm sorry towan about your complications. Before surgery one should inquire what it entails, what kind of metal is used for the sutures and/or hip replacement. I'm allergic to metals except stainless steel, gold above 14 kt, and titanium. I'm also allergic to adhesive on bandages. Yes, it is so important to follow your doctor's instruction....I will keep you in prayer and wait for you to report a full recovery!

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 4:54:34 PM

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Wow, Hedy. You really did have complications at the time. Do you think it had anything to do with being so sensitive? I'm glad you are fine now. I guess you don't want knee surgery! !!

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
Elvandil
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 7:57:34 PM

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Depending on the age and general health of the person, "recovery" may never be complete. Some elderly have a very hard time with healing broken bones. Hip damage is often fatal and can result in many complications, including pulmonary and cerebral emboli. Hopefully, the person is in good health overall. Even then, extreme care must be taken due to slower healing rates.





(議思不の界世) pןɹoʍ ǝɥʇ ɟo sɹǝpuoʍ ǝɥʇ ɟo ǝuo sı ǝpoɔıun
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, May 19, 2016 6:13:59 AM
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Thank you, everyone, for your replies.

I will print out the replies so that he can carefully read them.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 19, 2016 7:33:45 AM

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You're welcome, Parser.

Hi Hedy! Odd that the two really fast recoveries were your minister and my friend who is also a full-time minister.
I really do feel that (all other things equal - not taking allergy/sensitivity into account) state of mind can radically alter the time needed to "get back on top".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
hedy mmm
Posted: Thursday, May 19, 2016 11:15:46 AM

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Ditto Hope123..I DO NOT WANT KNEE SURGERY. I'm in pretty good health and I believe that a positive outlook, a strong faith in God, good decision making, especially knowing what can harm you, and following doctors orders are all very important factors.

As far as our minister, DragOnspeaker, they are especially blessed because the Lord needs them up on that pulpit, 'rightly dividing the word of truth'. Thank God!

I must add that it is very important to realize that other factors can come in to play, such as Elvandil has suggested.
A friend of mine's wife went in for knee replacement, it was successful but 5 days later, while still in the hospital, she contracted a staph infection and died, she was 63.

So I guess if you need surgery, get in and out fast....
TheParser.......we are not promised tomorrow


"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Roops
Posted: Saturday, May 21, 2016 2:25:22 AM
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Sorry to veer off the subject.

Drago & hedy, both have mentioned that the patients were 'ministers'. Do you mean they were working in Church,performing religious functions ?

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 21, 2016 11:00:38 AM

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Hi Roops.

Yes - I'm pretty certain that hedy's friend would be a Christian minister (from her mention of 'pulpit' and other things she has said).

My friend is a minister - she works full-time in another church, helping the sick, bereaved, upset . . . By 'race' she's a Russian Jew, nationality British.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Maryam Dad
Posted: Sunday, May 22, 2016 3:36:39 AM

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Hip replacement?
I never heard it before.
I have never heard old people here had hip or knee replacements.

Maybe because many people have routine exercises 17 times a day for years.

My parents both are 62 years old, means that they have done the exercise for about 50 years.

Kindness is a mark of faith. and whoever is not kind has no faith.
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, May 22, 2016 6:14:06 PM

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Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Maryam Dad wrote:
Hip replacement?
I never heard it before.
I have never heard old people here had hip or knee replacements.

Maybe because many people have routine exercises 17 times a day for years.

My parents both are 62 years old, means that they have done the exercise for about 50 years.


Hi Maryam, I am sure you are right. Barring injury, specific exercises and maintaining a healthy weight for your height and size is a good way to avoid these operations. However, some people play sports and sometimes repetition injuries can happen as well.

And there may be medical reasons why people don't get the proper nutrition and they may develop osteoporosis which may lead to broken bones.

It is sort of enviable that you have not heard of these operations. Good for your parents!

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, May 24, 2016 4:42:42 AM

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I had a work colleague who made a full recovery. It is important to listen to all advice, especially from the physiotherapy department. It is important to balance the recuperative exercises with risk assessment concerning falls and they are the best advisers on this. Do not rush, and listen to the signs your body gives you. I discovered that I was borderline osteoporosis (the fault of high doses of asthma medication and historical tobacco abuse)a couple of years ago after breaking my humerus (definitely not funny)after a relatively mild fall. I didn't notice until it was pointed out that I had unconsciously using handrails when using the stairs. The bone density is much better after calcium, vit D and Alandronic acid treatment, although I suppose it will mean having kidney stones instead. Good luck to your friend/colleague.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, May 24, 2016 6:14:32 AM
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pedro wrote:
Good luck to your friend/colleague.


Thank you.

And best wishes to you, too.

Ill health does indeed help some people put things into proper perspective.
Ben Jakes-Johnson
Posted: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 1:25:26 AM

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Location: New York City, New York, United States
My Great aunt had hip replacement done I think in her early 90s. She recovered in the hospital (or the institution with full physical therapy..not sure about the details of the type of facility), then at home she had full time care. The recovery was amazing actually - she was back on her feet walking without a cane after about a year. She is now 100 and slowing down a bit, but I do know that her stubborn personality really helped the quick recovery. Even though she had someone to cook and clean, she always insisted on bringing her dishes in to the kitchen by herself.
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 2:52:41 AM

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Your aunt sounds like a remarkable lady BJJ, to be so stoic at that age is admirable.

I am sure there is a lot to be said for mobility, your aunt and MD's parents seem to say constant activity is a large player in bone health.

It is surprising in our country of brilliant sunshine for so many people to be lacking in Vitamin D, caused by an over reaction to being the

Melanoma Capital of the world, that pendulum has swung too far.
TheParser
Posted: Friday, June 10, 2016 7:50:26 AM
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***** UPDATE *****

He has just received the bill for the operation and the three-day hospital stay: $18,000.

Since he is a senior citizen (elderly person), most of the bill will presumably be paid by a government health plan called Medicare.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2016 8:49:13 AM

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I'm sure he's glad it's over with, and I hope he's doing a lot better.

That's nearly my income for the year - good job we have the National Health Service.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2016 3:35:48 PM
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***** UPDATE *****

He wants to let everyone (young or old; male or female) know that there is protective clothing (hip protectors) that are available.

He wishes that he had been wearing a hip protector. It might have resulted in less injury to his hip.

There are specialty stores that cater to people who seek protective clothing.

You can also get an idea at Amazon of what's available -- for you or for a loved one.
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2016 9:16:40 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
Parser what is a hip protector, because I am not going back into corsets?
Axel Bear
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 7:34:47 AM

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Hip protector:





Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
pedro
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 9:25:45 AM

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There is UK info on these here http://www.livingmadeeasy.org.uk/clothing%20and%20footwear/hip-protectors-2545-p/

The Us equivalent is here; http://www.abledata.com/products?search_api_views_fulltext=hip+protector&field_product_status=All&items_per_page=20

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
nguoiduatin196
Posted: Monday, June 20, 2016 5:23:13 AM

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Some elderly have a very hard time with healing broken bones. Depending on the age and general health of the person, "recovery" may never be complete.

- Share <3
datdathcmutrans
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 5:30:08 AM
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I'm sure he's glad it's over with, and I hope he's doing a lot better.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 7:23:31 AM
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He thanks you very much. He is now wearing hip protectors.

(He is also wearing knee pads. It is said that knee surgery is even more painful than hip replacement.)
dakhoadaidong
Posted: Monday, February 06, 2017 10:03:38 AM
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I will print out the replies. thanks !
TheParser
Posted: Monday, February 06, 2017 11:01:10 AM
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dakhoadaidong wrote:
thanks !


You are very welcome.

One must be very careful when it comes to discussing medicine.

I think that the following comments are accurate:

There are two ways to perform a hip replacement surgery.

1. The anterior approach.

2. The posterior approach.

Of course, which approach is chosen by the surgeon depends on the general physical condition of the patient.

BUT some surgeons sincerely believe that the better method is the anterior approach.

They feel that there are not so many restrictions on movements during the recovery period and that the patient can recover more quickly.
phathai10tuantuoi
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2017 4:35:48 AM

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Very good: "I had a work colleague who made a full recovery. It is important to listen to all advice, especially from the physiotherapy department. It is important to balance the recuperative exercises with risk assessment concerning falls and they are the best advisers on this. Do not rush, and listen to the signs your body gives you. I discovered that I was borderline osteoporosis (the fault of high doses of asthma medication and historical tobacco abuse)a couple of years ago after breaking my humerus (definitely not funny)after a relatively mild fall. I didn't notice until it was pointed out that I had unconsciously using handrails when using the stairs. "
TheParser
Posted: Friday, February 10, 2017 5:38:23 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,244
Neurons: 19,881
Thanks for the interesting comments.

I always use the handrails when walking up or down the stairs.

I get really worried when I see (on TV) famous people walking down from an airplane and not holding on to the handrail.

I just do not understand why their advisers do not warn them about the dangers involved!

I realize that some younger people might think that it is not cool to hold on to handrails, but a fall could be disastrous.

*****

I am so happy that you have become a registered member.

There are so many great forums here where people post courteous, informative, interesting, and entertaining comments.

I look forward to reading more of your posts.



Have a nice day!

Chiến Bạch
Posted: Tuesday, April 04, 2017 6:27:01 AM

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Share everyone know
I'm sure he's glad it's over with, and I hope he's doing a lot better.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, April 04, 2017 7:54:44 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,244
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Chiến Bạch wrote:
I hope he's doing a lot better.



So far he is doing a lot better.

But when it comes to health, one never knows for sure: things can rapidly go south ( = become worse).

I will convey your kind words to him.



Have a nice day!


And welcome to TFD forums. We need lots of nice new members.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, April 09, 2017 1:29:35 PM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
For best, cheaper, immediate hip surgical recovery come to India. PM me .

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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