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be a huckleberry above a persimmon Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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be a huckleberry above a persimmon

dated To be better than average among similar things. Primarily heard in US. More...

coag
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 6:08:34 AM

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Too complicated, too long, to my taste. (I don't know what huckleberry and persimmon mean.)

Please, native speakers, give us something else (preferably simpler), with the same meaning.
whatson
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 8:19:32 AM
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What a wonderful opportunity to learn. (Don't miss the persimmons on display in Toronto the next time you pass by a fruit stand.)
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 9:47:19 AM

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Huckleberries and persimmons are both particular trees having particular fruits.
coag
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 7:02:10 PM

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Thanks, guys, for your comments.

I, also, checked dictionaries, in the mean time, for the meaning of huckleberry and persimmon. It is much easier to understand an idiom if you know the meaning of each word in it. This is a kind of contradiction to the definition of idioms but it's true.

I changed my mind. I am okay with the idiom now.

My question is, how often is this idiom used? Is it an active idiom, by which I mean is it used, or is it maybe (very) rarely used?
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 7:56:44 PM

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coag wrote:
My question is, how often is this idiom used? Is it an active idiom, by which I mean is it used, or is it maybe (very) rarely used?

In the original post it is graded as dated. Google gives 588 hits:

a huckleberry above a persimmon

Though they sometimes say "huckleberry above (one's) persimmon" or "huckleberry over (one's) persimmon" which probably will not add to many hits.

This is not a very good idiom. To me persimmons are tastier than huckleberries. Furthermore in Georgia where I was raised they say

ვირმა რა იცის ხურმა რა ხილია

which means

a donkey will not appreciate the taste of a persimmon.
whatson
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 8:07:58 PM
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In my 49 years in Canada (Halifax, Vancouver, Toronto) I've never heard it. I wouldn't utter it for fear of being taken for a horse trader in king Arthur's court.
coag
Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 10:16:33 PM

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Thanks for your responses, guys.
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