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Eggs Options
Priscilla86
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 2:43:07 AM

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In Indonesia and Singapore, brown eggs are more common.

However, most of us grew up watching westerners cook with white eggs on TV and have come to associate them with wealthy first-world countries. They also usually cost more than brown eggs over here.

So imagine how tickled I was to find out that some westerners regard brown eggs as a novelty, just as I did white eggs. Some say brown eggs are healthier, associate them with being organic, and as I understand it, they are more expensive, so there's that 'prestige' as well.

So, what egg color is most common where you live?
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 4:35:13 AM

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Interesting! I would say that here in India, brown eggs are costlier and are considered to be healthier. Brown eggs are arguably more organic (?) It is a perception of many people that white eggs can not be hatched to chickens, whereas brown eggs can be. In fact, white eggs are common but you may have to search for a shop which sells brown eggs.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 4:44:06 AM

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Hi!

Usually, they're a sort of dark pink/light pinkish brown - but it just depends on the hens, sometimes they're browner. I've never seen a white egg.

It's just a genetic thing - nothing to do with value, health, or anything. Duck eggs are blue. Leghorn chickens lay white eggs, Orpington's lay brown eggs.



I know we have Orpingtons and hybrid Orpingtons here in Britain, but I don't know much more than that. Obviously our farmers don't like leghorns. They're probably too noisy!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Annelise Carlsen
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 4:48:01 AM

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I never really thought about it but I believe white eggs are more common on the shelves of Danish supermarkets.

There is no quality difference whatsoever between white eggs and brown eggs. It's the breed of chicken that makes the difference.
Some breeds lay white eggs while others - such as Isa Brown or Rhode Island Reds - lay brown eggs. You can even find breeds of chicken that lay blue, green or speckled eggs.

Brown eggs tend to be a little more expensive but not because they are healthier or "better" in any way - it's simply due to the fact that brown eggs normally are a little bigger than white eggs. Also, the chickens that lay brown eggs are often bigger than those that lay white eggs and require more feed. This is of course reflected in the retail price.
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 5:46:22 AM

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It seems to be a myth only that one kind (colour) of eggs is healthier and hence costlier. It basically depends on the hens. We have broadly two categories of hens, one is coloured ones (we call them desi*) and the other is broiler. Broilers are farmed in poultry farms on a mass scale. Their cultivation and breeding are less expensive than desi breed (almost 50%). This results in cheaper production of chickens and eggs. While desi breed results in brown eggs, broilers produce white eggs. Ultimately, the pricing of white eggs is lesser.
But how come the perception of healthier eggs has come in existence, I am not sure. Although I personally have been a witness and also a believer of this myth that brown eggs are more nutritious.

From my experience I can however say that there is difference in yolk of the two types, in texture and in taste as well.


*desi means country product.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Priscilla86
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 5:58:26 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It's just a genetic thing - nothing to do with value, health, or anything.


Annelise Carlsen wrote:


There is no quality difference whatsoever between white eggs and brown eggs. It's the breed of chicken that makes the difference.
Some breeds lay white eggs while others - such as Isa Brown or Rhode Island Reds - lay brown eggs. You can even find breeds of chicken that lay blue, green or speckled eggs.

Brown eggs tend to be a little more expensive but not because they are healthier or "better" in any way - it's simply due to the fact that brown eggs normally are a little bigger than white eggs. Also, the chickens that lay brown eggs are often bigger than those that lay white eggs and require more feed. This is of course reflected in the retail price.


I agree that there's no difference in terms of nutrition or which color is supposedly healthier for you. I think the rise of people bragging about brown eggs I've seen on social media these lately is mostly because brown eggs are more novel where they are (most posters are from countries where white eggs are the norm). I just find it amusing because I think we sort of take brown eggs for granted because they're the most widely available kind here so to hear someone brags about having brown eggs (and there's even a hashtag for it), just interesting to me :)

I'm not sure about your argument regarding brown eggs being bigger in size and the chickens being bigger thus require more feed as the cause of high cost because over here, brown eggs are the norm (and definitely no association with being organic or free range). The pictures below are taken from a local supermarket's website and as you can see, the price difference is quite significant:


Over here, there is however what we call "Kampong" chicken". "Kampong" means village and it refers to indigenous chickens raised using traditional method which means they are mostly free-range. They produce smaller eggs and much lighter in color. These eggs are considered superior in taste (not sure if it's the power of suggestion but I happen to agree). But I literally never know anyone who stocks them in their fridge.
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 6:15:31 AM

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Priscilla86 wrote:

Over here, there is however what we call "Kampong" chicken". "Kampong" means village and it refers to indigenous chickens raised using traditional method which means they are mostly free-range. They produce smaller eggs and much lighter in color. These eggs are considered superior in taste (not sure if it's the power of suggestion but I happen to agree). But I literally never know anyone who stocks them in their fridge.


I second you on this.
For us, it is the "desi" chicken or egg.



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Annelise Carlsen
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 6:39:37 AM

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Priscilla86 wrote:

I'm not sure about your argument regarding brown eggs being bigger in size and the chickens being bigger thus require more feed as the cause of high cost because over here, brown eggs are the norm (and definitely no association with being organic or free range).


It may not be the case everywhere - I guess there are many breeds of chicken around the world.
However, I found the information about the chickens being bigger in size on a couple of Danish websites (which I won't link to since they are in Danish...) and also this one (in English) which has the same explanation. Scroll to the paragraph "Why are Brown eggs often more expensive?".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 6:42:58 AM

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There IS a difference between battery chicken eggs and free-range eggs (usually).

It is in the colour of yolk, the taste, possibly even the "healthiness" - but not in shell colour.

Battery hens are fed with prepared mixes of foods - in the past in Europe (and probably over there in the Philippines too) dried fish-meal was a cheap favourite with the 'factory farmers'. This was sometimes lacking in vitamin A - because the fish livers were removed to be processed into beta-carotene for the health-food market - so the yolks of the eggs would be almost white. Also the eggs tasted of fish - or if the food was processed to remove the fish-taste, the eggs were tasteless.

"Free-range" hens eat whatever they can get, so there tends to be more variation (these are the equivalent of your "Kampong" and SriRR's "desi" chickens).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 7:54:54 AM

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I must say I prefer brown eggs.

Iceland tend to be white. There is an Icelandic hen. Like other livestock here, it was preserved from early settlers without any imports until the last few decades. They can survive outside, and lay white eggs.

Nowadays there are imported breeds and chickens grown in big barns (not in cages, they are free, but a lot living together) but a freerange hardy breed is much better for everyone, chickens and human.


In season and in the right place, people choose guillemot eggs. People climb down the cliff faces to collect a few - or let someone else do it and buy them.



(no, its not all in English, the Icelandic word for egg is....Whistle
ritu is kittiwake.)



In the UK I find the ones I buy are always brown, speckled of various shades. I find them more appealing than white, aesthetically. Like red onions. Just for the colour.
But the health value is surely all about what they are fed on. Maybe a small amount on the breed. And massively on the welfare of the chickens.
I never buy large eggs. I feel for the chicken who lays them! I have worked on a chicken farm (free range easy to let them out in the mornings but trying to get them back into the barn at he end of the day? Grrr d'oh!. Brick wall

In Iceland there is a bit of a thing about eggs. There is one place where an artist has made sculptures of eggs from each of the types of birds found locally, and put them up along the road. Like you do. Whistle
Actually, it is in an area called the Eastfjords which is way off the tourist trail. With jobs lost in the fishing industry people are doing their bit to attract visitors.





Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 8:31:18 AM
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I agree that there's no difference in terms of nutrition or which color is supposedly healthier for you. I think the rise of people bragging about brown eggs I've seen on social media these lately is mostly because brown eggs are more novel where they are (most posters are from countries where white eggs are the norm). I just find it amusing because I think we sort of take brown eggs for granted because they're the most widely available kind here so to hear someone brags about having brown eggs (and there's even a hashtag for it), just interesting to me :)

I'm not sure about your argument regarding brown eggs being bigger in size and the chickens being bigger thus require more feed as the cause of high cost because over here, brown eggs are the norm (and definitely no association with being organic or free range). The pictures below are taken from a local supermarket's website and as you can see, the price difference is quite significant:


Over here, there is however what we call "Kampong" chicken". "Kampong" means village and it refers to indigenous chickens raised using traditional method which means they are mostly free-range. They produce smaller eggs and much lighter in color. These eggs are considered superior in taste (not sure if it's the power of suggestion but I happen to agree). But I literally never know anyone who stocks them in their fridge.[/quote]

There is a health difference in the white eggs in your pictures Priscilla86, they are enriched in Omega3, by feeding the hens that laid them a diet high in seeds such as flax that contain high levels of it.
The eggs those hens produce have more Omega 3, if only by a small amount than normal and humans can benefit from eating them.
https://www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/omega3.pdf
It may be that feeding only hens that lay white eggs such a diet makes it easier to sort them from other eggs.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
progpen
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 9:11:04 AM

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In the US for many years, white eggs were thought to be safer and purer because of marketing. This led to almost all commercial eggs being white. When the organic and free range movement started, people saw the brown and green eggs as an easy identifier (they weren't all white), and so multicolored eggs began to demand a premium price.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
TMe
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 9:30:42 AM

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One explanation is
"How egg shells get their color involves a biology and chemistry lesson, but we’ll try and keep things light here. It takes 26 hours for a hen to produce an egg. Twenty of those hours are required to form the shell. Near the end of this process, some hens will release a pigment that colors the shell.

These pigments are called porphyrins and they influence color in nearly everything from plants to human blood. Concentrations of protoporphyrin result in brown eggs, while biliverdin will produce a blue or green hued egg."

However, an egg is an egg and its color has nothing to do with its potency. It's the chicken feed that determines the lessor or the more nutritious quality of eggs.



Deliberate practice of one hour is worth ten hours of normal practice.
Priscilla86
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 9:58:35 AM

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thar wrote:
I must say I prefer brown eggs.

Iceland tend to be white.

In the UK I find the ones I buy are always brown, speckled of various shades. I find them more appealing than white, aesthetically. Like red onions. Just for the colour.



I'm the opposite but for exactly the same reason as yours: I'm more used to brown eggs so to see white (or light-colored) eggs feels like a novelty.

thar wrote:


no, its not all in English, the Icelandic word for egg is....Whistle
ritu is kittiwake.



All those words just to say 'egg'? p.s. guillemot eggs look so beautiful!

Sarriesfan wrote:
There is a health difference in the white eggs in your pictures Priscilla86, they are enriched in Omega3, by feeding the hens that laid them a diet high in seeds such as flax that contain high levels of it.
The eggs those hens produce have more Omega 3, if only by a small amount than normal and humans can benefit from eating them.
https://www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/omega3.pdf
It may be that feeding only hens that lay white eggs such a diet makes it easier to sort them from other eggs.


Well, that may be, Sarriesfan, but the fact remains that over here, lighter-colored eggs are less commonplace than the brown ones and they usually demand higher price. I don't know what led to all commercial eggs being brown here but I'd really like to know why, just for the sake of knowing.

progpen wrote:
In the US for many years, white eggs were thought to be safer and purer because of marketing. This led to almost all commercial eggs being white.



Ah!


Drag0nspeaker wrote:


Battery hens are fed with prepared mixes of foods - in the past in Europe (and probably over there in the Philippines too) dried fish-meal was a cheap favourite with the 'factory farmers'. This was sometimes lacking in vitamin A - because the fish livers were removed to be processed into beta-carotene for the health-food market - so the yolks of the eggs would be almost white. Also the eggs tasted of fish - or if the food was processed to remove the fish-taste, the eggs were tasteless.



This reminds me of an article I read few months ago about color-enhanced salmons. But why 'the Philippines', though? I'm not from there...Think

ETA. I didn't know white eggs were more common in India. Always thought as fellow Asian country, brown eggs would be the norm
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 11:25:24 AM

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In India people prefer to consume brown-shelled eggs. But do you know what sellers do? They put white-shelled eggs in a concoction containing common tea leaves for the whole night. In the morning, the eggs adopt a brown hue then they sell those as healthier eggs. The most common belief, in India, is that the brown-shelled eggs are fertilized ones, hence, is a zygote (more nutritious) while a white egg is a single-celled egg and hence less nutritious.

Learning is my passion.-Aj
TL Hobs
Posted: Thursday, January 26, 2017 5:57:42 PM

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We do not have any large-scale egg producers in Alaska, thus most of our eggs comes from Seattle, or elsewhere in the "Lower 48." However, there are many local farmers who sell their eggs to others at a higher cost than the big box grocery stores, and they are fresher. That, to me, is the distinction between a good egg and a lesser egg. It has little, or nothing, to do with the color of the shell.

In the US, egg cartons are marked with the Julian date the egg was packaged to give an indication of freshness. (Julian date is the numerical number, 1-365, of the day of the year beginning with January 1st.) An egg left at room temperature will age faster than one kept chilled in a refrigerated cooler. One day at room temperature equals a week chilled. When shopping for eggs, I look for size and freshness. I buy locally produced eggs when available.


"When you don't know where you are going, you have to stick together just in case someone gets there." - Ken Kesey
Romany
Posted: Thursday, January 26, 2017 7:55:42 PM
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Strangely enough (I'm not an egg fiend) I came across an article in a scientific magazine the other day which dealt with exactly this issue.

In England, apparently, people thought brown eggs looked 'healthier' and were more aesthetically pleasing. So they began to prefer brown eggs. The article stressed there was absolutely no difference - just like people, some are brown, some are white. It hasn't anything to do with size, better health or anything other than that's the way it is.

However, people weren't going for the white ones as much so most now are brown. There's no difference in price here.
TL Hobs
Posted: Thursday, January 26, 2017 9:00:26 PM

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I forgot to mention that the age of an egg makes a difference in its freshness. As the egg ages the membrane between the shell and white deteriorates. The thicker the membrane, the fresher the egg. A good membrane makes it easier to peel a hard boiled, or baked, egg.

I get egg-gravated with big farm egg-riculture if they sell eggs that aren't egg-zactly what they are labeled to be.

Whistle

"When you don't know where you are going, you have to stick together just in case someone gets there." - Ken Kesey
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 10:39:58 PM

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TL Hobs wrote:
I get egg-gravated with big farm egg-riculture if they sell eggs that aren't egg-zactly what they are labeled to be. Whistle


An egg-semplary statement! Dancing

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, January 28, 2017 11:18:58 AM

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An egg-semplary statement! Dancing

Well done, DragO sir.

Learning is my passion.-Aj
Priscilla86
Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 9:13:03 PM

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Romany wrote:

Strangely enough (I'm not an egg fiend)


Aw...why, though, Romany? I love eggs, sometimes it's as simple as hard boiled eggs for a quick breakfast or snack.

Romany wrote:

In England, apparently, people thought brown eggs looked 'healthier' and were more aesthetically pleasing. So they began to prefer brown eggs. The article stressed there was absolutely no difference - just like people, some are brown, some are white. It hasn't anything to do with size, better health or anything other than that's the way it is.

However, people weren't going for the white ones as much so most now are brown. There's no difference in price here.


But has this always been the case or just recently?

You don't have to convince me that shell color doesn't really have anything to do with quality, though. Trust me, I'm surrounded by brown eggs and some of them can be pretty tasteless.


TL Hobs wrote:

We do not have any large-scale egg producers in Alaska, thus most of our eggs comes from Seattle, or elsewhere in the "Lower 48." However, there are many local farmers who sell their eggs to others at a higher cost than the big box grocery stores, and they are fresher. That, to me, is the distinction between a good egg and a lesser egg. It has little, or nothing, to do with the color of the shell.

In the US, egg cartons are marked with the Julian date the egg was packaged to give an indication of freshness. (Julian date is the numerical number, 1-365, of the day of the year beginning with January 1st.) An egg left at room temperature will age faster than one kept chilled in a refrigerated cooler. One day at room temperature equals a week chilled. When shopping for eggs, I look for size and freshness. I buy locally produced eggs when available.


Didn't know Alaska didn't have large-scale egg producers. Learn something new everyday! Why doesn't Alaska have one? Is it because of the temperature / climate?

Btw, seeing you live in Alaska, you can either store your eggs in the fridge or just put them in the garage or outside, right?
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 1:15:08 AM

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Priscilla86 wrote:
In Indonesia and Singapore, brown eggs are more common.
So, what egg color is most common where you live?

Both are sold here in Russia



Only the size matters for the price. Like someone on the picture I usually choose brown.
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 1:44:59 AM

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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:


Only the size matters for the price. Like someone on the picture I usually choose brown.


Why? I'm interested to know because if in your country both variants are available and in terms of price / quality they are about the same, what makes you prefer white / brown?
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 4:31:24 AM

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Priscilla86 wrote:
Why? I'm interested to know because if in your country both variants are available and in terms of price / quality they are about the same, what makes you prefer white / brown?

When I was a child back in the USSR only white eggs were industrially produced and sold in stores and you only could see brown eggs in markets. I think I instinctively associate brown eggs with countryside home and health.

By the way in your picture I see packages of 10 and 30 eggs just like here in Russia. In Canada they sell eggs by the dozen. The same in UK as can be seen on DragOn's picture. And I found a dozen egg package to be more convenient.
Kunstniete
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 10:14:38 AM

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TL Hobs wrote:
I forgot to mention that the age of an egg makes a difference in its freshness. As the egg ages the membrane between the shell and white deteriorates. The thicker the membrane, the fresher the egg. A good membrane makes it easier to peel a hard boiled, or baked, egg.


Strangely I just heared and expierenced it the other way round: The older the egg, the easier it is to peel.
But age has an influence of the quality of the egg: the yolk and egg white will have different distributions if you prepare a fresh or old fried egg.

In Germany there is really no difference between brown and white eggs, I'd say they're mixed and its just coincidence which ones you get (it doesn't matter if you buy free-range-, biological- or other eggs). You can buy packages of 6 or 10 eggs here.

Romany
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 1:34:01 PM
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Priscilla - as to whether the preference for brown eggs is recent or not, I think it must be pretty recent?

I certainly don't remember anything other than a feeling of 'pot-luck' about the colour of the eggs one consumed. It is only since I've come back after all this time, that I came across the 'brown is better' phenomenon. The reason I liked brown eggs better than white as a kid was because their shells were shiny and smooth - white ones didn't shine and their surface didn't have the smoothness of brown ones. Nothing to do with taste or health.

By the way, in England we buy eggs by the dozen usually, yes. But we also buy them in trays of 6,10, 20 and 24. (I usually buy the 10 carton.)
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 2:00:56 PM

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Romany wrote:
By the way, in England we buy eggs by the dozen usually, yes. But we also buy them in trays of 6,10, 20 and 24.

I could find pictures of 30 and 18:



Funny. Why would you need so many different packages? It's not that easy to compare prices for cartons of different size.

Romany wrote:
(I usually buy the 10 carton.)

And you probably said No to Brexit. :)
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