The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Past; Salves, Balms, and Other Magic Potions, Powders, and Preperations. Options
Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 8:35:23 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 3,942
Neurons: 58,839
Some of the posts in the "Plastic Food Packaging" thread evoked thoughts on this subject, after nearly posting the following in that thread, I realized this could be an interesting topic on it's own. I don't think any of us remember snake oil salesman, but I know some of us predate jet travel, and that is long enough ago to have been treated with some amazing stuffs.

Now on the topic of salves, balms, and other magic potions from the past, it is really amazing some of the ingredients of medicinals I remember having administered to me as a child. There was a stomach medicine that had to be the most awful tasting stuff in this quadrant of the galaxy called, paregoric.
Also good for teething, but then tincture of opium might be good for many things.
What I'm really curious of though, is anyone familiar with a drawing unction by the name of woolly (spl?)salve, it came in the form of a black brick. To administer, a portion was broken off, placed on the tip of a butter knife and held in the flame of the stove too melt, allowed to cool a bit, then applied. I can find no references to this on the web, so I figure I'm spelling it wrong, anyone else remember this stuff?

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
Alias
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 9:28:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2010
Posts: 677
Neurons: 1,993
Location: Australia
Epi wrote: (It) "came in the form of a black brick. To administer, a portion was broken off, placed on the tip of a butter knife and held in the flame of the stove"

Hmmm are you sure your parents werent bohemian? Did they visit India or Pakistan perchance? Or maybe Nepal....did it have white streaks...Its commonly known as Hash but is more properly Cannabis Resin...

Paregoric as well..a little opium to help the kids sleep thru the night so the parents can hold sessions with their crew listening to Dark side of the Moon...
I get it Epi...it seems you had an interesting childhood...I am surprised you remember any of it...(laughs)

I think its about time chickens are able to cross the road without constantly having their motives challenged!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 10:31:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 40,006
Neurons: 307,603
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Like this?




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 10:45:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 3,942
Neurons: 58,839
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Like this?

Nope, it came in a paper wrapped brick, may have been oiled or waxed paper, and it had a name like woolly? salve. I'd also like to hear of any old or folk remedies you know of.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
RuthP
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 11:41:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 4,945
Neurons: 33,551
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Epiphileon wrote:
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Like this?

Nope, it came in a paper wrapped brick, may have been oiled or waxed paper, and it had a name like woolly? salve. I'd also like to hear of any old or folk remedies you know of.


Epi - I think you are talking about ichthammol drawing salve. This is ammonium bituminosulfonate. If you look at the second word, think bituminous coal.

JJ's product would be the same, though his was may have been melted or ground and mixed in another base.

Coal-tar products were among the first used to treat psoriasis and dandruff (they are still around) and have also been used for head lice (though not, I believe for body or pubic lice), and yes, ichthammol is "black drawing salve".

Your brick is probably a thing of the past. It likely had too high a percentage of coal tar in it. Coal tar contains a lot of aromatic hydrocarbons (which are usually pretty nasty molecules) and too high a percentage is carcinogenic. (Deponent sayeth naught about continued exposure at lower levels.) You can probably

And yes, for the civil engineers amongst us, it's the same stuff that goes into asphalt paving.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 2:17:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 40,006
Neurons: 307,603
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Ruth is most probably right. Found this:

"Drawing salve or draw-out salve is an ointment that has a seemingly miraculous ability to draw out splinters and boils from skin. The version that we reviewed is a thick black paste that is packaged in a small tube, but it is also available in small jars. Your first impression upon opening the package will invariable be one of disgust - this stuff smells foul! Once you overcome the pungent odor, you can marvel at its abilities.

The listed ingredients are: green soap, white petrolatum, ichthammol, sulfated tallow sodium salt, white beeswax, light mineral oil and 8-hydroxyquinoline benzoate; ichthammol is the active ingredient. The package claims that drawing salve is effective at drawing out boils, infections and stings. It is also said to soothe scrapes, ingrown toenails and insect bites. We cannot specifically vouch for all of these applications, but it is particularly effective at raising difficult-to-remove splinters to the surface of your skin. You simply put a small dab directly on the skin and cover with a bandage. After several hours you will notice that the skin in the application area has softened and the splinter has been lifted out.

The product seems to be an anachronism insofar as it seems to hail from another era. We would have given it a perfect score if it wasn't for the foul odor and mildly offensive black color."






In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
blue2
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 2:40:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/25/2010
Posts: 2,552
Neurons: 23,044
Location: Préveza, Epirus, Greece
Have any of you heard of Rawleigh Antiseptic Salve? My mom swore by the stuff. I don't know if it still says "For man or beast" on the outside, but I know we used it on the cat and it was okay. Read the anecdotal information below. There are more uses for it!

http://www.rawleigh.net/antiseptic_salve.htm

"Ignorant men don't know what good they hold in their hands until they've flung it away." - Sophocles
martyg
Posted: Sunday, February 27, 2011 3:21:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 327
Neurons: 2,386
i immediately went to my bathroom cabinet and pulled out the following:
ichthammol ointment 20%. i have a blue (?) color tube containing; petrolatum(?), ichthammol, anhydrous lanolin & light mineral oil. these contents are usually listed in order of the stongest ingredient to the weakest.

i also pulled out "gardeners' salve" which is supposed to help; chapped hands, be a bug repellant, make homemade toiletries and many other things.

on occasion i use both. the label on the tin was torn so i couldn't list all the ingredients.
dlux3
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 12:20:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 188
Neurons: 557
Location: Cairns, Far North Queensland, Australia
My mother had this little jar of the most odius black ointment that I believe was given to her by my Nanna. It was a drawing ointment. Mum probably still has the jar, I must ask her.

Also comfrey cream, made, obviously, from comfrey leaves (also known as knitbone), is a wonderful, powerful healer.


The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.
Alias
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 11:47:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2010
Posts: 677
Neurons: 1,993
Location: Australia
We had a tube of stuff we called "green ointment" it was Rexona ointment and contained eucalyptus, thyme, tea tree, and several other oils. It was truly magic..it was good for wounds,chafing, infctions, stings, fungus,psoriasis,boils, bites and more...

Also Paw Paw ointment..pure....is phenomenal. The active ingredient is Papain which has amazing healing anti scarring properties...even old scars can improve...placed on damaged skin early will reduce the size and consistency of the scarring.

Comfrey was used as a wound healer by invading Roman soldiers. Knife, sword and spear wounds were treated with poultices of comfrey leaves. Ointments are even better.

Lasonil and Hirudoid creams reduce and eliminate bruising effectively.

Tiger Balm is a universal healer and emolient..

Rosehip Oil reduces fine capillary damage on skin..

I think its about time chickens are able to cross the road without constantly having their motives challenged!
Vickster
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 1:07:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/19/2010
Posts: 2,405
Neurons: 7,211
Location: Massachusetts, United States


I was thinking about this... but that's for poison ivy... God knows my mother thought this stuff was magic!!

He who sings scares away his woes. ~Cervantes
excaelis
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 1:37:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2010
Posts: 10,981
Neurons: 32,652
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
And then, of course, there are our old friends...

Leeches

Sanity is not statistical
Alias
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 2:41:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2010
Posts: 677
Neurons: 1,993
Location: Australia
Yes Ex ...I know your tongue is firmly planted in your cheek ....but the truth is LEECHES are making a comeback!!!Anxious

Leeches (Hirudo medicinalis) historically used to remove "bad blood," are now used extensively by reconstructive surgeons needing to remove stagnant blood from a flap or reattached limb. When the venous blood does not return to the heart, it pools in the wounded area, increasing pressure and preventing fresh arterial blood from entering the area with oxygen and nutrients. The venous blood must be removed and the pressure must be reduced in order to save the flap or limb. The leech is able to do this exceptionally well, because its saliva contains biochemicals including vasodilators, anticoagulants, and anesthetics.

Perhaps the best-known advocate of medical leeches today is Roy Sawyer, an American researcher. Several decades ago, he noted the potential benefits of leech therapy and started one of the world's first modern leech farms. Today, the company BioPharm, which is based in Britain, provides tens of thousands of leeches every year to hospitals in dozens of countries.

In 2001, the mechanical leech was developed, in part by Nadine Connor, a University of Wisconsin at Madison scientist. The device, which looks a little like a small bottle attached to a suction cup, delivers an anti-clotting drug, similar to that in a leech's saliva, to damaged tissue and then gently sucks out as much blood as needed. Unlike real leeches, the mechanical version is insatiable and can remove as much blood as doctors think is necessary.



Read more: http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Medical_Leeches/overview/NaturalStandard20#ixzz1FKVBcQH4

I think its about time chickens are able to cross the road without constantly having their motives challenged!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:37:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 40,006
Neurons: 307,603
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Then there is this few thousand years old tradition of cupping...




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 5:33:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 11,092
Neurons: 39,842
Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
Antiphegestine (spelling maybe off) Poultice, I remember having to heat it and wrap between two layers of gauze.

Stank to high Heaven.

We can still buy Rawleighs Products , Goanna Oil etc. The last Travelling Salesman to out laying properties, that I can remember.

Also had a product that was for use as a hair tonic and hemorrhoids, versatile stuff.
Wanderer
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 9:54:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/6/2010
Posts: 1,554
Neurons: 78,988
I have had cupping a few times and it relieved my allergies. It worked so fast. At first, my nose began to drip then just started running. After a few hours it began drying up and I was fine the next day. It was amazing! We moved and I have never found anyone who knew how to do it since. It looks gross, but it didn't leave anything but some little puncture marks on my skin.
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 1:38:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 4,945
Neurons: 33,551
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Tovarish wrote:
Antiphegestine (spelling maybe off) Poultice, I remember having to heat it and wrap between two layers of gauze.

Stank to high Heaven.

We can still buy Rawleighs Products , Goanna Oil etc. The last Travelling Salesman to out laying properties, that I can remember.

Also had a product that was for use as a hair tonic and hemorrhoids, versatile stuff.

Perhaps antiphlogistine?

I think the root is from phlogiston, which is an old pseudo-substance which was thought to be in everything flammable: it made things burnable.

It's a different kind of "drawing salve", which is intended to draw out inflammation (i.e. heat), usually in an injured joint or muscle.
kingfisher
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 2:05:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/15/2009
Posts: 208
Neurons: 633
Location: United States
You can still buy ichthammol at the local drugstores here in the southern United States. Some of my patients swear by it.

When I was a kid and got a cut, my mom would put a thin, orange-ish liquid on it that stung like the dickens. I think it was called merthiolate or methiolate? Anybody remember this torture?
Vickster
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 2:32:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/19/2010
Posts: 2,405
Neurons: 7,211
Location: Massachusetts, United States
Benzoin Tincture??? brownish orange and burns...for cuts and scrapes?

He who sings scares away his woes. ~Cervantes
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 2:44:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 4,945
Neurons: 33,551
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
kingfisher wrote:
You can still buy ichthammol at the local drugstores here in the southern United States. Some of my patients swear by it.

When I was a kid and got a cut, my mom would put a thin, orange-ish liquid on it that stung like the dickens. I think it was called merthiolate or methiolate? Anybody remember this torture?

Man, you guys are a blast from the past. I've not thought of any of these in forever.

Probably Merthiolate. This was a trade-name for thimerosol (US), thiomersal (international). The orange color makes me wonder, because thimerosol is generally clear to maybe very slightly yellowish..

Thimerosol/thiomersal is a sulpher/mercury-containing organic compound which had a long use as a disinfectant. It is most known now as a (former) controversial additive to vaccines.

Mercurochrome, which shares the issue of having mercury in the compound and is orange, was used similarly.

Neither Merthiolate nor Mercurochrome is available in the U.S. There are products labeled Merthiolate; they seem to all be benzalkonium chloride, a totally different chemical.

It might be possible to get the originals over the internet; this would not be legal in the U.S. due to mercury restrictions.
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:05:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 4,945
Neurons: 33,551
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Vickster wrote:
Benzoin Tincture??? brownish orange and burns...for cuts and scrapes?

Taxing my brain, today. (Not too hard to do.)

Tincture of benzoin is made by dissolving benzoin resin in alcohol (thus, tincture). The resin is from a tropical tree. The sticky form you remember is compound tincture of benzoin, and has another tree sap and aloe added, which make it sticky.

This is sometimes used under casts and surgical bandages and is still a common home treatment for blisters.
aerie
Posted: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 6:04:47 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 8
Neurons: 24
Location: United States
Late to the thread topic but had to comment on this orange blast from the past.

In my family, the medicine cabinet was where you kept the mercurochrome. As a toddler born w/ a genetic inability to resist a kitten & always covered with love-scratches - arms, ankles, hands, cheeks & mom would 'paint' every one of them orange, I was orange-covered most of my childhood...skinned knees, mosquito bites, blisters, chronic nail-biting & mom would paint my sore nubs...for sore/scratchy throats my grandpa would wrap a stick w/ cotton, dip it in mercurochrome and 'paint' the back of my throat with it. That still blows a lobe for me, even as a former 'user'. I could go on...

40+ yrs later, I'm pretty sure that my mercury-poisoned organs are the cause of some serious, chronic mental & health issues. I'm not yet ready to glimpse my old-age, so for now, denial works. Because really, what to do about them? You can't un-ring a bell, only learn from it. Thank the ceiling gawds I didn't give it to my children. In fact, I made the conscious decision to do the polar opposite of most everything my parents considered to be good child raisin'.

Very interesting topic. I remember what they called a "salve" that smelled exactly like bacon. Mostly the old folks used it, but for what, I do not know. I saw some "salve" in a Rite-Aid store just yesterday, and it surprised me. Why I continue to be surprised by such nonsense, I don't know. I should be thoroughly desensitized by now being born/raised in the [American] south where ignorance & ever-comforting delusion lives on, including in my own family.
retrostuff
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2011 2:43:33 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/10/2011
Posts: 2
Neurons: 6
Location: United States, TN
Epithileon posted on February 27, 2011 "What I'm really curious of though, is anyone familiar with a drawing unction by the name of woolly (spl?)salve, it came in the form of a black brick. To administer, a portion was broken off, placed on the tip of a butter knife and held in the flame of the stove too melt, allowed to cool a bit, then applied. I can find no references to this on the web, so I figure I'm spelling it wrong, anyone else remember this stuff?

Just found this forum when I Googled Wooly Salve today. I was beginning to think I was the only person who remembers Wooly (I don't know exactly how to spell it either) salve and have been trying to find out what happened to it for ages. I spent my young years in Pennsylvania and our entire extended family there swore by the stuff. It came in a black tar-smelling stick, about the size of one of those fat crayons we were given in grade school, wrapped in off-white paper with black lettering showing a picture of a sheep in profile. The one time I recall it being administered to me, I was about four or five years old, in the early 1950's. I had a very large boil on my stomach. My mother and my aunts held me down on grandmas kitchen table, sterilized a big darning needle with a match, and pierced the boil. They then held a match to the stick of Wooly Salve and let it drip a little onto the boil and covered it with a gauze bandage. Sounds barbarous I know, but it just felt like hot candle wax for a second. The following day the bandage was removed and with it came all of the infection, transferred onto the bandage. Powerful stuff! Somewhere I heard it was an old Native American remedy. The closest thing I can find these days is the 20% ichthemol ointment, which I always keep on hand. It doesn't seem to be quite as strong as Wooly Salve, sometimes taking a few days to work as it seems to be diluted in petroleum jelly. I once used the ointment on a cat of mine who'd been bitten on it's ankle tendon and developed an infection. The veterinarian was appalled, but it worked like a charm, the cat recovered completely, and it saved me some big bucks. Thanks for your posting, I was beginning to imagine I'd made up the stuff.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2011 5:59:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 40,006
Neurons: 307,603
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Welcome, retrostuff!
As you can see we have a wide coverage of different cultures and generations with all their knowledge and willing to share it ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Epiphileon
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2011 10:34:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 3,942
Neurons: 58,839
retrostuff wrote:
Thanks for your posting, I was beginning to imagine I'd made up the stuff.

Thankyou Retrostuff for coming to answer my query, and well come to the forum. Yes it was pretty amazing stuff, far better than anything on the market today. I have not found any other information on it as yet.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
retrostuff
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2011 11:43:22 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/10/2011
Posts: 2
Neurons: 6
Location: United States, TN
Epithileon wrote: Thankyou Retrostuff for coming to answer my query, and well come to the forum. Yes it was pretty amazing stuff, far better than anything on the market today. I have not found any other information on it as yet.

After my initial posting I remembered searching the internet several years ago, and came across a a single reference to Wooly Salve. It was from a letter written by a young soldier during the Civil War mentioning he had some injury or infection, but trusted some of Mama's Wooly Salve to treat it. So we know it's been around at least that long.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, August 20, 2011 12:42:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,354
Neurons: 40,701
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
When the kids and I moved to Australia they had already been Body Boarders competitively since about the time they could hold a board. As any surfer will know, the backs of the ankles suffer considerably from chaffing (from flippers) which then gets sand in because its weepy and turns to ulcers. I don't remember how I got on to it,but from the time they first started, I never went anywhere without Gentian Violet in my bag. It was the only thing that seemed to dry up these chaffed or ulcerated places (also appear on the instep as well) and still allow the guys to keep going in the water.

So the Gentian Violet travelled to Australia where, very quickly, each member of the particular mob my own boys surfed with, came to think of it as a miracle cure. There was a constant stream of them coming to the house for treatment.

Of course Gentian Violet is bright, indelible purple. It used to make me grin when at Comps., because you could always pick the blokes from our neck of the woods out: - they all had purple feet!
RevCharlotte Matzke
Posted: Sunday, April 13, 2014 2:31:41 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/13/2014
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Does anyone remember a purple salve that was rubbed into the chest for colds and upper respiratory issues. I remember that it worked so very well and thought the name was pneumonicin.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, April 14, 2014 2:45:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 40,006
Neurons: 307,603
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Not sure about the colour of the original stuff, but in my youth we used Vicks VapoRub.
The Croup and Pneumonia Salve was introduced in 1905 with the name Vick's Magic Croup Salve and rebranded as VapoRub in 1912.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Ray41
Posted: Monday, April 14, 2014 6:16:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/9/2010
Posts: 1,943
Neurons: 45,980
Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia
Friars Balsam has been around for as long as I can remember and was/is used for inhaling, wound dressing, etc.
It is still available.
The main ingredient is the compound Tincture of Benzoin.
The link below gives information on just what it is made from, and, surprisingly, it is used in the US Army.


Quote:It is much used in sport to protect damaged skin areas and the US Army drains servicemen’s blisters, replacing the exudate with the same volume of Tinc Benz Co.

http://www.thealliancepsp.com/CPD/COMPOUND%20TINCTURE%20OF%20BENZOIN.pdf
*********************************************************************************************************************
Eichorn's is something that I am familiar with using it as a gargle to cure a throat infection in 1958 when all other avenues were exhausted from the "Outback Medical Kit' which also contained sulphur drugs, (no anti-biotics then).

The PDF below gives an insight into just how the inventor, August Eichorn, used to peddle this remedy at country shows, etc. There are pictures of the bottles and packaging of Eichorns as I knew it.
This is a bottle from the 1925 to 1939 period.






The link also goes on to give the origin of Goanna Liniment and Goanna Salve(which Tov mentioned).

http://www.pharmaziegeschichte.at/ichp2009/vortraege/vortraege_volltext_pdf/L19.pdf

While I live I grow.
Hope2
Posted: Monday, April 14, 2014 10:52:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/6/2012
Posts: 4,909
Neurons: 16,769
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Oh man. The stuff we have put in and on and are still putting in and on our bodies is horrifying. My GI doc once told me that you should consider that what goes on the skin is absorbed the same as if you ingested it. Can you imagine eating petroleum? Or mercury? Or ammonium? Or perfume? Or coal tar? Or mineral oil? Some guy even turned blue from ingesting silver. And we used to play with the x-ray machine found in every shoe store when we were kids.

And all those little bits of thimerosal that used to be used in vaccines, and may still be in some shots in Canada, add up. Since immunization is important, they have removed it from children's vaccinations, but I think it should be gone from shots period. I had forgotten about mercurochrome and had no idea back then that it was from mercury. (We had iodine too, which is helpful.) Along with what mercury is in the air, what occurs naturally in lake water, in fish, and is in amalgam for tooth fillings, plus a spill where I used bare hands to clean up, I managed to get severe mercury poisoning. And one metal attracts another in the body.

Thankfully we are learning about such dangers from petroleum, chemicals, mercury, lead and other toxic metals, asbestos, plastic, pesticides, etc. Humans have been guinea pigs for all these products since the Industrial Revolution but especially during the last sixty years. And then we wonder why there is an explosion in autism, cancer, obesity and other diseases and syndromes.

Most of the trouble in the world is caused by people wanting to be important. T. S. Eliot
walthergirl
Posted: Saturday, May 17, 2014 2:53:42 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/17/2014
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
This is to all of those in question about this Wooly Salve. It works!!! My family has used it for many many years. I have seen it with my own eyes and was hoping to be able to find it again because I need to get some more. I will always keep some in my medicine cabinet. Applause Brick wall
garoessler
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2015 11:48:46 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/11/2015
Posts: 1
Neurons: 5
Epithileon posted on February 27, 2011 "What I'm really curious of though, is anyone familiar with a drawing unction by the name of woolly (spl?)salve, it came in the form of a black brick. To administer, a portion was broken off, placed on the tip of a butter knife and held in the flame of the stove too melt, allowed to cool a bit, then applied. I can find no references to this on the web, so I figure I'm spelling it wrong, anyone else remember this stuff?"

Wooly Salve! I was amazed to find reference to it here. I remember my mother using this on our splinters and miscellaneous infections when we were kids---a very long time ago. (I am now 70! Grew up in Western PA, not far from Pittsburgh.) And it always worked. Smelly, but worth it!

No sign of it on Amazon.com, and I had begun to thing that it was perhaps a figment of my imagination. So I was glad to see it referred to here.

I did find out (through Amazon.com) that this type of thing is generally referred to as "drawing salve" and Amazon does have a variety of them available, including ichthammol, altho this seems to be one of the less highly rated ones. I also found (Google) a Wooly Salve Company, listed as existing since 1900 in Harrisburg, PA. Two arrests? LOL!

Thanks for letting me know that I have not TOTALLY lost my mind!
Epiphileon
Posted: Tuesday, July 14, 2015 5:07:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 3,942
Neurons: 58,839
Thanks Garoessler and welcome to the forum. I grew up in Pittsburgh about a decade behind you.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
speediebean
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 5:36:35 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/27/2016
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
RevCharlotte Matzke wrote:
Does anyone remember a purple salve that was rubbed into the chest for colds and upper respiratory issues. I remember that it worked so very well and thought the name was pneumonicin.


I know this is a really old thread (and post), but I came online this morning to find out this very same thing; that's how I found this forum. Anyway, I have found out what that stuff is! It's called Numotizine Ointment, and believe it or not, it's still available for sale in the same old formula. Not sure that I'm allowed to name any specific places where one can purchase it so I won't (I'm not here to advertise), but I just wanted to reply to RevCharlotte with the name of that stuff. I'm pretty sure that's what you were talking about. My Mom used to use that on me when I was a kid and had a chest cold and WOW it sure worked.
Anyway, I hope this helps RevCharlotte or someone!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.