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Anthony Trollope, anyone? Options
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, November 05, 2016 12:22:11 PM
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Just in case there are one or two members/guests who care about the British novelist Anthony Trollope (1815 - 1882), I am delighted to share something that I have just read.

1. "The English novel, forged in the 18th century by men ... was, as [Mr. Trollope] saw it, being taken over by women."

2. Mr. Trollope "reckoned the best women novelists were already as good as men."

3. He "feared that if the brakes were taken off, women would not just encroach on male territory but take possession of it."

4. "It explains why he was forever trying to remasculinise the process of fiction-writing."

5. "He flooded the market by writing all the time."

6. "Novel-writing, he wanted everyone to know, was men's work."


*****

If anyone wants the whole article, look for "Besieged by Female Writers" by John Pemble in the London Review of Books, November 3, 2016.
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Saturday, November 05, 2016 2:16:38 PM

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Wow. I didn't realize this. I think some of his later stuff was a good deal more sympathetic to women. But then I tend to zone out gender issues when reading a book.

In any case the quote "His faults were his time's but his virtues were his own" can still apply to them. Some authors are conservative by nature & Trollope never pressed for social change the way Dickens did. They're both valuable to read, to me.

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, November 06, 2016 3:25:15 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
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Andrew Schultz wrote:
Trollope never pressed for social change the way Dickens did.


Hello, Mr. Schultz:

I am glad that those points from the article resonated with you.

I hope you can read the whole article.

Since you mention Mr. Dickens, I thought that you'd like to know that the same article says that Mr. Trollope considered Mr. Dickens's fiction to be maudlin, melodramatic or hysterical.

I personally never read fiction. I am a 100% non-fiction man. But I envy people who do find fiction to be helpful.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 8:03:25 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
TheParser wrote:
the same article says that Mr. Trollope considered Mr. Dickens's fiction to be maudlin, melodramatic or hysterical.

This was the impression I received from the three (maybe four) Dickens books I read as a child.

I wouldn't use the word "hysterical" - even the 'psychological' meaning rather than the 'sexist' one. I don't really see how someone can be 'maudlin' and 'hysterical'.
You can 'melodramatise' being sad, but "violent or excessive outbursts of uncontrollable misery" somehow doesn't work for me.

I'd like to read the whole article - maybe when the copyright runs out . . .
I'm not a paid up subscriber.

However, for anyone who wants to join, here's the address.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TheParser
Posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 8:29:58 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,674
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Thank you SO MUCH, DragOnspeaker, for the link.

The London Review of Books is a wonderful way to learn about the latest books.

I look forward to the receipt of each print edition.

It also contains many informative letters from readers.

It is a "teacher" in the true sense of the word.






Calcifer Y
Posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 10:53:17 PM

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Joined: 5/13/2015
Posts: 907
Neurons: 5,813
Location: Napa, California, United States
Thank you very much.
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