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What simple bathroom habit can kill us? Options
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 10:16:52 AM
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A few websites are warning us NOT to do something in the bathroom.

These websites say:

We brush our teeth.

We wash our face.

Then we do this.

The websites warn us that doing "this" a dozen times or more a year can "increase sudden, early death by 360%."

Those websites then tell us the answer can be accessed only by watching a short video.

I have been unable to access the video.

If you have, please let the rest of us know what this dangerous bathroom habit is.
Lotje1000
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 10:32:51 AM

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Sounds like clickbait
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 10:42:24 AM

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Well it's posted in the medical thread...drinking bleach?

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
towan52
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 10:48:17 AM

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If you've been doing whatever it is, you'd be long-time dead by now. Probably a scam email.

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Donthailand
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 11:09:40 AM
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Leaving the toilet seat up...
Axel Bear
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 12:06:28 PM

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Neurons: 22,368


Slipping...



Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 12:13:22 PM

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Drying your face with a towel which is not straight from an autoclave.

You'd think that people had grown up in a totally sterile environment.
The body is designed to throw off infection, unless you work hard to stop it from working right!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 12:56:35 PM

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Location: Gualala, California, United States
It seems to be this:

Quote:
This bathroom habit kills you a little bit every day

You do it so routinely you likely never give it a thought. Yet you’re almost surely inviting trouble. And over decades, that trouble can become serious.

Don’t expect a warning from the government. You’ll have to become your own watchdog here.

Ready to get started? Here goes. . .

Whether male or female, you probably shampoo your hair almost every day. And if you’re like most people, you’re unaware that shampoo is one of the most toxic of all the products you put on or in your body.

Right now you sit in the crosshairs of a $60 billion industry intent on giving you “better living through chemistry.”

Even if you read the labels to try to figure out if a shampoo is safe, it practically takes a PhD in chemistry to decipher them. What’s more, some of the really bad things lurking there are byproducts of the ingredients – meaning they don’t have to be listed.

So how do you know if your shampoo is actually safe to use? And that it’s not going to lead you to cancer 15 or 30 years down the road? This issue provides a quick guide.

An industry insider recently explained that every shampoo is built around four kinds of chemicals:

Surfactants – harsh and leaves hair brittle
Cleaning agents – strips dirt from your hair
Foaming agents – creates bubbles
Fragrances – give shampoo a unique identity
Here’s a major tip – and it’ll go against your common sense: If you want to buy a completely safe shampoo, skip the one with the green-sounding name that hints at botanical wonders.

The 50 or so ingredients in this “natural” wonder are linked to cancer, infertility, allergies, and dysfunction of the immune and endocrine system. Doesn’t sound so safe to me.

By contrast, one of the safe products listed on Skin Deep®, the cosmetics hazard-rating site sponsored by Environmental Working Group, contains just three ingredients – palm oil, cacao seed butter, and coconut oil.

Despite the glow of natural claims on the pretty packaging, nearly all beauty products depend heavily on synthetic chemicals. In Europe they test for “CMRs” – carcinogens, mutagens, and reproductive toxins.

But in America the beauty industry is given free reign. More than 80,000 chemicals are registered. Fewer than 500 have been safety tested – and certainly not for long-term use over a period of decades.

New chemicals constantly enter the market, so it’s impossible to know every offender. But here are the biggies. . .

A witch’s brew of toxic chemicals

Just how toxic is your shampoo? It’s probably worse than you think. Grab your shampoo bottle and check for these ingredients. Unfortunately, you should do this even if you buy your shampoo at a trusted health food store.

1. Sodium laurel sulfate (SLS), along with its cousins and cover names. Likely the most dangerous ingredient in shampoo. It’s in most shampoos, even so-called “natural” products and baby shampoos. To confuse (and hide) things even further, it’s got more than 100 names.

SLS lowers the surface tension of water so the shampoo spreads out. Manufacturers use it because most people equate lather with cleaning strength. Don’t be fooled.

SLS is extremely potent, can circulate in your body for about a week and can leave deposits on your organs. It’s linked to serious skin/scalp irritation, hair loss, and the ability to generate nitrates (linked to cancer and cell damage). SLS also causes malformations in children’s eyes.1

In Japan it’s used in research to deliberately cause mutations and change DNA. Dr. Samuel Epstein, environmental expert, links SLS to liver and kidney cancers.

Another problem: its molecular size is so small it gains easy access into skin, scalp, and pores.

SLS goes by the aliases diethanolime (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA), and monoethanolamine (MEA). It has dangerous cousins, too: sodium laureth sulfate, disodium laureth sulfosucinate, lauamide MEA, cocamide DEA, cocamide MEA, and even the innocent sounding term coconut.

Most shampoos contain about 50 percent SLS, 40 percent water, and a witch’s brew of other things.

2. SLES (sodium laureth sulfate). Though mentioned above, this chemical gets a second mention because it’s often contaminated with 1,4 dioxane – a known carcinogen suspected of causing kidney damage. But since 1,4 dioxane is a petroleum byproduct, manufacturers are shrewd enough to leave it off the ingredient list.

3. Parabens. Preservatives linked to reproductive damage and organ toxicity – even at low doses. They mimic estrogen, fuel estrogen-related cancers, and were found in the breast tissues of 99 percent of breast cancer patients.

4. Polyethylene glycol (PEG). This petroleum product makes things creamy. It too is often contaminated with 1,4 dioxane. California classifies it as a developmental toxin, i.e. a poison to growing embryos and children. PEG may also be tainted with another known carcinogen, ethylene oxide.

5. BHA. This preservative fights rancidity. Linked to cancer, organ toxicity, endocrine disruption, and allergies. It accumulates in your tissues, so the more you use, the higher your risks.

6. Fragrance. Sounds romantic, but beware. Fragrances used in shampoos (and most personal care products) are a chemical cocktail of typically 14 or more compounds from industry’s arsenal of 3100 fragrance chemicals. Says Dr. Joseph Mercola, “When you see ‘fragrance’ on a personal care product’s label, read it as ‘hidden chemicals’.”

These compounds are linked to organ toxicity (including the liver), central nervous system damage, allergies, brain fog, headache, obesity, asthma, and cancer.

If you have health symptoms you can’t explain or cure, your shampoo could be the cause, or at least one of the causes.

Unfortunately, this list could go on. That’s why…

Some people refuse to shampoo their hair

Regulation has not been effective because of a phenomenon called “regulatory capture.” Regulatory agencies are largely controlled by the industries they supposedly regulate. No need to search out conspiracies – this is just the natural order of things. Virtually ALL laws and regulations are generated by small groups that have an intense interest in the subject (or a lot of money at stake). The other 99.9% of the population simply doesn’t get involved.

And where personal care products are concerned, the story is even worse. The FDA focuses on foods and drugs, and largely lets the industry self-regulate when it comes to cosmetics and personal care products.

The best guidance you can probably get is Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep® website. It can help steer you to safer options – so you don’t have to completely skip shampooing.

Their safety guide, launched in 2004, helps you find safer products.

They check the research, crosscheck names and spellings (variations abound), and match each to databases revealing hazard levels or safety. They assign a hazard score for each ingredient, and evaluate products relative to all other products on Skin Deep®.

From this, EWG reveals one of the safest shampoos – Skin Free Extra Moisturizing Soap – with its three simple ingredients as one of the top ten brands for safety. By contrast, a brand that claimed to be environmentally sound ranked in the bottom ten of 1,051 shampoos.

Better yet, they now have an app that lets you scan the barcode to get EWG’s analysis of that product.

Finally, you can make your own shampoo. Though I haven’t personally tried it, it sounds simple enough.

Mix 1 part baking soda to 3 parts water, leaving space in the container for shaking. Shake, pour and massage into wet hair. Let sit 1-3 minutes. Rinse thoroughly.

Apply a vinegar rinse if desired… 1 part apple cider vinegar to 4 parts water. Add essential oils if desired (lavender, peppermint, and/or rosemary). Avoid getting the mixture in your eyes.

You can find other DIY options online. The biggest benefit of DIY?

You actually know what’s entering your body via your biggest organ, your skin. Some doctors say they’d never apply anything to their skin they wouldn’t be willing to eat. It sort of makes sense, because the skin is quite effective at taking in substances and letting them into the bloodstream. Most of what you rub on your skin finds its way into the rest of your body, except for the brain, which is protected from many substances by the blood-brain barrier.



This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 1:27:59 PM

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This is a report about the benefits of not washing your hair AT ALL. It is in a newspaper, and does just happen to mention the name of the book written by the reporter and the person being reported about, but . . .

There is a 'messy transition period' of a month or so, but after that, washing in plain water a couple of times a week is supposed to be enough.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 3:28:26 PM
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Thank you, everyone, for your thoughts. Especial thanks to DragOnspeaker for that research.

*****

I am aware of the responsibility that anyone has when posting in this forum. One should not add to all the misinformation that is found in reputable media as well as on the Internet. I will be as careful as possible.

*****

1. Several months ago, I received an email from some health information website. It would reveal the problem ONLY in a video. I have a dial-up Internet service, so I cannot access videos.

2. I googled and found several websites that repeated the same warning and told readers to click on the video, which I could not do.

3. Here is one of those websites: INH Newsletters - Simple bathroom habit deadlier than cigarettes.

a. Although I could not access the video, I did read the website's claim that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States had even made an announcement regarding this matter.

4. I then did some googling.

5. I may (repeat: may) have found out what the original email was warning us about.

a. You can read it by googling: FDA warns against the use of saline laxatives -- Mercola

6. If I remember correctly, "Mercola" is the name of the doctor who sent me the original email several months ago.

7. The FDA says that at least 13 persons have died because of the use of OTC (over the counter) laxatives. It did not give a time period.

a. As I said, I want to be very responsible. I will not state any opinion. I will, however, suggest that people who regularly take OTC laxatives MAY wish to read the FDA report that I have mentioned in 5a.

Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 4:57:58 PM

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Parser, thanks for the info. It is not good to take any kind of laxative for any more than a day or two as the system becomes dependent upon them. Either a plain old magnesium supplement or a pure glycerine suppository will work well in emergencies in my opinion. (Not recommending)

I don't know anything about him but I have seen Dr. Mercola's name online. Dr. Mercola has been discredited by mainstream medicine before but - if he said saline laxatives may be dangerous, he may have a point. See the FDA link.

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm379440.htm

Edited - I checked on google about saline laxatives as you suggested. I imagine the reason they can possibly be dangerous is because they alter the balance of electrolytes and cause dehydration in the body. They have changed the prep for colonoscopies now and the new prep doesn't wipe me out like the Fleet's Phosphosoda used to do, as the new one does not change the electrolyte balance.


(Alternative care docs are always being challenged by mainstream. One has to do one's homework and make one's own decision. http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/mercola.html )

:::::

Digression - American and Canadian celebrities say that if you see their name in conjunction with a product, do not buy it. Some companies take a phrase out of context from something they have said publicly, and use it to 'show' that the celebrity endorses the product, when they have no connection to it whatsoever.

:::::

Melissa's suggestion that it might be chemicals in our personal products is a good one. I have mentioned before that my GI doc said that products on the skin are absorbed almost as well as from the digestive tract.



Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Gary98
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 5:37:22 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
This is a report about the benefits of not washing your hair AT ALL. It is in a newspaper, and does just happen to mention the name of the book written by the reporter and the person being reported about, but . . .

There is a 'messy transition period' of a month or so, but after that, washing in plain water a couple of times a week is supposed to be enough.


DIY suggested in MelissaMe's message is worth trying. Not washing your hair AT ALL will not work.
Axel Bear
Posted: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 7:42:43 PM

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Joined: 4/5/2015
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Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, October 05, 2016 5:05:37 AM
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Thank you very much for the three recent posts.

Many thanks, Hope, for your very informative and carefully considered comments.




MelissaMe
Posted: Wednesday, October 05, 2016 12:13:18 PM

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Donthailand wrote:
Leaving the toilet seat up...


Quote:
It's there for a reason! How flushing the toilet with lid up 'could spread winter vomiting bug'
By CLAIRE BATES
UPDATED: 02:54 EST, 4 January 2012

It may seem like a subject ripe for toilet humour - but whether you close the lavatory lid before you flush could have an impact on the spread of disease, according to an expert.

Professor Mark Wilcox, Clinical Director of Microbiology at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, said leaving the lid up can allow a cloud of bacteria to explode into the air, settling on nearby surfaces.

This increases the risk of viruses like the winter vomiting bug of transmitting to another person.

'It is very clear from our work that the lid is there for a reason,' Professor Wilcox told Mail Online.

Professor Wilcox and colleagues from Leeds University conducted a study to see how using a toilet lid could affect the spread of disease, specifically in hospitals.

They used a sterilised toilet cubicle and created a 'diarrhoea effect' in the bowl using stool samples that had been infected with the hospital superbug C. difficile.

They found C diff was transported up to 10 inches above the toilet seat when it was open and a reduced rate was still detected in the air up to 90 minutes later. Although C diff did travel through the gap when the lid was down it was found in far lower concentrations in the air.

When the lid was closed no C. difficile was recovered on any surface, but when it was open it was found on the cistern, to the right and left of the toilet seat and on the floor.

The norovirus (left) is thought to be spread by odourised droplets, like those found on the filter paper during the tests (right)

Professor Wilcox said: 'We then put vegetable colour dye in the water bowl, lifted the lid and put cling film over the toilet seat. After we flushed the toilet we found it sprayed a large amount. By placing the film onto filter paper we found that the toilet could spray up to 50 droplets per flush.'

They noted that many hospital toilets don't have lids - ironically in an attempt to stop cross-contamination from handling a lid.

The professor said that although it was unlikely that keeping the lid up would be a 'huge' health hazard, their findings suggested patients with a superbug should at least have a dedicated toilet.

He added that their research also had wider implications, telling the Mail Online: 'It would be prudent if there is a lid to put it down after flushing.

'This contains smells and droplets that can become aerolised. Some bugs spread more easily to surfaces this way and the norovirus is thought to be one of them.

'Our advice - put down the lid if it's there and wash your hands afterwards.'


Put The Lid Down!

This is my only now.
MelissaMe
Posted: Wednesday, October 05, 2016 12:14:54 PM

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TheParser wrote:


a. You can read it by googling: FDA warns against the use of saline laxatives -- Mercola



Some delicious prunes or a small plate of fresh figs should do the trick quite nicely, and without any harmful chemicals.

This is my only now.
MelissaMe
Posted: Wednesday, October 05, 2016 12:27:01 PM

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Gary98 wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
This is a report about the benefits of not washing your hair AT ALL. It is in a newspaper, and does just happen to mention the name of the book written by the reporter and the person being reported about, but . . .

There is a 'messy transition period' of a month or so, but after that, washing in plain water a couple of times a week is supposed to be enough.


DIY suggested in MelissaMe's message is worth trying. Not washing your hair AT ALL will not work.


For a while I tried just rinsing using a very watered down mixture of apple cider vinegar and water. Then I went back to regular shampoos, but watered down and using them in an emptied out foaming hand soap dispenser. Now I'm going to look for something with fewer ingredients, maybe even the baking soda DIY cleanse before the apple cider vinegar and water conditioner.

And here's the ingredients of my soap:
Quote:
Saponified oils of Olive (Olea Europaea), Palm (Elaeis Guineensis), Castor (Ricinus Communis), Coconut ((Cocos Nucifera) and Shea Butter (Butyrospermum Parkii), Rose (Rosa damascena) Absolute, Coconut (Cocos Nucifera) Extract, Vitamin E (Tocopherol Acetate), and Indulgent Complex [Coconut (Cocos Nucifera) Milk, Rose (Rosa rubginosa) Hip Oil, and Marshmallow (Althaea Officinalis)].



Quote:
ROSE & COCONUT MILK BAR SOAP 4.75 OZ $6.00
Delicate and precious Rose essential oil combines with nourishing coconut milk to gently cleanse and pamper fine skin.




This is my only now.
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, October 05, 2016 5:34:37 PM
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Thanks, MelissaMe, for all the informative posts.
MelissaMe
Posted: Thursday, October 06, 2016 11:05:04 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Thanks, MelissaMe, for all the informative posts.


You are most entirely welcome! Angel

I've been neutropenic before - I take my health very seriously.

This is my only now.
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2016 11:48:50 AM

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Oh, and another little factoid about the bathroom, in respect to the finding that your toilet is cleaner than your kitchen sink! Think

Quote:
If you dropped a piece of fruit in your kitchen sink while rinsing it, would you think twice about popping it in your mouth? What if you dropped it in the toilet?

Germs like cold viruses and bacteria can live in some unexpected spots. Here are six surprisingly dirty places in your home -- like your kitchen sink -- and what you can do to protect yourself.

Dirty Places: The Kitchen Sink

Although the mere thought of retrieving anything from your toilet bowl may be enough to make you sick, your toilet may be cleaner than your kitchen sink, says Eileen Abruzzo, director of infection control at Long Island College Hospital of Brooklyn, New York. Food particles from plates left to soak or rinsed from dishes on their way to the dishwasher can serve as a breeding ground for illness-causing bacteria, including E. coli and salmonella. They can get on your hands or spread to foods.

Although most people take steps to disinfect their toilet bowls, few give their kitchen sink the same consideration, Abruzzo tells WebMD. “They rinse their sinks with water and assume they are clean -- but they’re not.”

Quick fix to banish bacteria:

To sanitize your sink and prevent the spread of bacteria, Abruzzo recommends washing it with a solution of bleach and water once a day and then letting the solution run down the drain. Remember to remove the drain plug and clean it, too, she says. Then wash your hands.


This is my only now.
Tovarish
Posted: Saturday, October 15, 2016 3:12:49 AM

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Using the hair dryer whilst in the bath, without out your life insurance being up to date.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, October 21, 2016 11:08:36 AM

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An all enclosed bathroom without inlet of Oxygen and outlet of obnoxious gases is a gas chamber.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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