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"Bingo hall raid nets enough guns to start a small war." Options
Chazlee
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 7:36:53 AM
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In America, police officers are often under attack, both verbally and physically at times, from the general public. However, I have to personally say that I feel lucky to have hard-working and dedicated law enforcement officers working 24/7 to ensure that in the US, where guns are plentiful, bad things are stopped before they have a chance to begin. A case in point is what happened in Houston, Texas recently, after "a year-long undercover operation."

Police raided a bingo hall,which was said to look like a "doomsday shelter," and they "confiscated 100 guns, $87,00 and body armor." One officer said that the guns found were "enough to start a small war." Investigators "found the stash of cash, guns, ammunition and body armor hidden in an underground bunker below the bingo hall."

One of the defense lawyers for the 12 arrested people stated "It's ridiculous (the raid and arrests) is what it is. It's a legitimate bingo hall. They're running a state licensed bingo operation."

Actually, what is ridiculous is that civilians in American are hoarding guns and body armor. If these people had not been caught, it is very easy to imagine what horrible things would have likely happened.

Thus, I want to take this opportunity to say "Thank You" to these great law enforcement officers!Applause

Peace.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/texas-bingo-hall-raid-nets-enough-guns-to-start-a-small-war/
Anna Bean
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 3:44:12 PM
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Except owning any quantity of guns in Texas is perfectly legal. The body armor, too. The sheriff's department had no right to seize them. That's the part you left out.
progpen
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 5:52:14 PM

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Anna Bean wrote:
Except owning any quantity of guns in Texas is perfectly legal. The body armor, too. The sheriff's department had no right to seize them. That's the part you left out.


Money laundering is not. But you already know that.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
redgriffin
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 8:58:12 PM

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Anna Bean wrote:
Except owning any quantity of guns in Texas is perfectly legal. The body armor, too. The sheriff's department had no right to seize them. That's the part you left out.


Imagine using a Bingo Parlor to launder money is there anything Texans won't do for money?
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 9:47:56 PM

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Ah, so an $87.00 hoard is evidence of money-laundering?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 4:57:18 AM

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Is that eighty-seven dollars?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 10:46:45 AM

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Found the original news report. It seems that the sum in question was $87,000.00 (eighty-seven thousand dollars). Still, one ought not quibble at the loss of a zero or two, particularly when a post has been written by one who was obviously laboring under the strain of intense excitement engendered by exposure to journalistic dog whistle phrases.

At least two of the twelve people arrested have reportedly been "charged with engaging in organized criminal activity." Though the Harris County Sheriff's Office is one of the largest police departments in the United States, a "year-long undercover operation" would entail a somewhat substantial investment of Sheriff Office manpower and other resources: a commensurate result would be expected.

It would be interesting to know the eventual result of the prosecution of these serious criminal charges. Perhaps Chazlee would undertake to follow this case to its conclusion and to update us on whatever plea deals or trial results (additional charges, more specific charges, reduced or dropped charges, exoneration or convictions) may ensue, including forfeiture of property (real estate, vehicles, money, computers and software, cash registers, furniture, kitchen and food service equipment, bingo cards, guns, etcetera), fines and jail or prison sentences.
Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 2:05:19 PM
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Orson Burleigh wrote:
Ah, so an $87.00 hoard is evidence of money-laundering?



No, I made a mistake. It should be $87,000.

Peace.
Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 2:05:39 PM
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Joined: 7/24/2016
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Is that eighty-seven dollars?




No, I made a mistake. It should be $87,000.

Peace.
Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016 2:24:45 PM
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Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 3,722
Orson Burleigh wrote:
Found the original news report. It seems that the sum in question was $87,000.00 (eighty-seven thousand dollars). Still, one ought not quibble at the loss of a zero or two, particularly when a post has been written by one who was obviously laboring under the strain of intense excitement engendered by exposure to journalistic dog whistle phrases.

At least two of the twelve people arrested have reportedly been "charged with engaging in organized criminal activity." Though the Harris County Sheriff's Office is one of the largest police departments in the United States, a "year-long undercover operation" would entail a somewhat substantial investment of Sheriff Office manpower and other resources: a commensurate result would be expected.

It would be interesting to know the eventual result of the prosecution of these serious criminal charges. Perhaps Chazlee would undertake to follow this case to its conclusion and to update us on whatever plea deals or trial results (additional charges, more specific charges, reduced or dropped charges, exoneration or convictions) may ensue, including forfeiture of property (real estate, vehicles, money, computers and software, cash registers, furniture, kitchen and food service equipment, bingo cards, guns, etcetera), fines and jail or prison sentences.



Actually, when I read and post a comment about people working at a bingo hall having 100 guns, body armor, and .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets, which can penetrate armored personnel vehicles, I don't get excited. I get scared. These people were not members of either law enforcement or members of the military. They were just American people who feel it is ok to own such life destroying items. And in all likelyhood they would have used what they had if they would not have been stopped.

I would also like to see what will happen to these people. You surely do not offer any reason for those arrested to be in possession of those things. However, if more information is reported upon this case, you bet I will post messages about it.

In the meantime, let them rot in jail until such time as they can explain why they were hiding 100 guns, body armor, and .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets underneath a bingo hall .







Orson Burleigh
Posted: Monday, August 29, 2016 2:05:41 AM

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Do please report fully. Your report that the police weapons and munitions haul included .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets seems to be a new development in the case.

Your suggestion that I do not offer any reason for the possession of firearms or ammunition by people with whom I am not acquainted is correct. Indeed, I have no particular reason to assume that the Harris County Sheriff's Department arrests are anything other than the well founded result of laudable police work.

That said, you might want to reconsider your "Sentence First--Verdict Afterwards" "let them rot in jail" approach to the alleviation of your fears. The administration of 'Justice' based on that approach has already been far too common in this world.
Chazlee
Posted: Monday, August 29, 2016 4:02:41 AM
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Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 3,722
Orson Burleigh wrote:
Do please report fully. Your report that the police weapons and munitions haul included .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets seems to be a new development in the case.

The new development came after I did further reading about the case, and also more information is being reported.

Your suggestion that I do not offer any reason for the possession of firearms or ammunition by people with whom I am not acquainted is correct. Indeed, I have no particular reason to assume that the Harris County Sheriff's Department arrests are anything other than the well founded result of laudable police work.

That said, you might want to reconsider your "Sentence First--Verdict Afterwards" "let them rot in jail" approach to the alleviation of your fears. The administration of 'Justice' based on that approach has already been far too common in this world.


Yes, you are correct that my legitimate fears are somewhat alleviated knowing that the people who hid 100 guns, body armor, and .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets underneath a bingo hall are locked away in a jail cell, at least for the time being.

Saying "let them rot in jail until they can explain" their actions is not the same thing as administering justice. It is simply requiring those people who feel it is ok to possess and hide life destroying items to explain their reasons for doing so because their reasons are not obvious. None of us need to ask a law enforcement officer, or an active member of the military why he/she feels the need to be in possessions of such items. The answer is clear. However, it is not so easy to understand why owners/employees of a bingo hall feel they need to hide 100 guns, body armor, and .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets. In modern day America, far too many people are being killed by guns. So, if someone or some group of people feel they have the need to hide 100 guns, body armor, and .50 caliber armor-piercing bullets under a bingo hall, then they have some explaining to do, and if they refuse to do so, then I have no problem letting them rot in jail.


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