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A very bad verbal exchange between a defendant and a judge Options
Chazlee
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 2:03:56 PM
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I am sure that nobody is really surprised that judges and defendants in criminal cases do not always like each other. However, often there is decorum in a courtroom, but this is not always the case.

In the American state of Georgia, a judge, and a defendant accused of murder, got into quite a verbal exchange recently. The defendant said "f_ _ _ you" to the judge at least three times, and even threatened the judge by saying “I’ll kill your whole family. When I get in this trial, I will murder your whole family. I’ll cut your children up into pieces. I’ll knock their brains out with a f—— hammer and feed them to you.”

The judge said about the defendant that he had a “constitutional right to be a dumbass,” and he also said to the defendant that “You know, you look like a queer.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/06/24/youll-find-out-how-nasty-i-really-am-a-judges-seething-response-to-a-hostile-defendant/?tid=hybrid_experimentrandom_1_na&utm_term=.a5368c683686

While I understand that things can and do get heated in the courtroom at times, and I know that criminal defendants can become unruly at times, it seems that the judge made things worse by his engaging in an argument with the defendant, and even calling him names. Yes, judges are human beings, and they have the right to defend themselves verbally or physically if they are attacked. However, unlike criminal defendants, judges also have an obligation to set an example of how everyone in a courtroom should behave. Yet, it seems the judge in this case failed to set a very good example.

Please share your thoughts about this topic.

Peace.
Axel Bear
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 3:31:37 PM

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If Donald Trump is the next POTUS, then this sort of court house dialogue will be the norm.


Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 3:38:35 PM

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Axel Bear wrote:


If Donald Trump is the next POTUS, then this sort of court house dialogue will be the norm.


Applause Applause That's funny, Axel.

It must be very hard for lawyers, police, judges, jail guards etc to ignore such taunts day after day. But don't give them the satisfaction, Mr. Judge. You are the one in charge. Just lock him up for contempt of court till you calm down. It's like a parent who argues with a defiant child.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. Albert Einstein
Chazlee
Posted: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 3:59:18 PM
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Axel Bear wrote:


If Donald Trump is the next POTUS, then this sort of court house dialogue will be the norm.


Yes, you are right. Name calling, and threats will definitely become the norm.

Peace to you.
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2016 12:10:07 AM

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Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Chazlee wrote:
I am sure that nobody is really surprised that judges and defendants in criminal cases do not always like each other. However, often there is decorum in a courtroom, but this is not always the case.

...

Please share your thoughts about this topic.


Unfortunately there will always be people who look for an excuse to get in a cheap shot, from positions of power, with a "they said it first" excuse. That doesn't excuse the people with less power. It's hard to take the bait either way, but at the same time I imagine it may be boring to say "That's enough and you know it." Freedom of speech means freedom to bait other people. But yeah--that doesn't make it right.

Hopefully there's a judicial review for this judge to say, yeah, don't let this happen again.

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
Lotje1000
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2016 2:28:15 AM

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Chazlee wrote:
The judge said about the defendant that he had a “constitutional right to be a dumbass,” and he also said to the defendant that “You know, you look like a queer.”


This was so close to being an open-and-shut case of the defendant being an idiot. And then the judge had to ruin it. Nobody wins.

The judge was worse in this case, in my opinion. He has a reputation to uphold and needs to remain professional.
TiMonster
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2016 2:49:39 AM
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"constitutional right to be a dumbass" this made me smile though Whistle
tessablue2
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2016 5:20:17 AM

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Where were the attorneys? Typically, if a defendant's attorney is present, the judge would urge him/her to control their client.

Both the judge and defendant were out of order. Clearly, the defendant lacks any semblance of self-restraint and appears to have serious mental and moral issues. After all, he is accused of murder. Yet, I would expect the judge to exhibit behavior that would be honorable and preserve the dignity of the bench--hence, the title, "Your Honor."

I agree Chazlee, the proceedings appear to make a mockery of American jurisprudence.
Chazlee
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2016 7:23:55 AM
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tessablue2 wrote:
Where were the attorneys? Typically, if a defendant's attorney is present, the judge would urge him/her to control their client.

Both the judge and defendant were out of order. Clearly, the defendant lacks any semblance of self-restraint and appears to have serious mental and moral issues. After all, he is accused of murder. Yet, I would expect the judge to exhibit behavior that would be honorable and preserve the dignity of the bench--hence, the title, "Your Honor."

I agree Chazlee, the proceedings appear to make a mockery of American jurisprudence.


You bring up a good point. I don't think the article mentions anything about other lawyers in the courtroom at all.

Peace
Axel Bear
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2016 7:28:52 AM

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tessablue2 wrote:
Where were the attorneys? Typically, if a defendant's attorney is present, the judge would urge him/her to control their client.

In the court of Judge Judy I have never seen an attorney of any color.

Both the judge and defendant were out of order.

Judge Judy knows how to keep everyone under control.



Judge Judy [Sheindlin] is the highest-paid television person in the USA. According to Forbes she has a net-worth of $US250 million and Wikipedia writes that she earns almost one million dollars per workday. The show is a great celebration of American jurisprudence featuring the best of the trailer-park trash available. There appears no lack of talent here. And the show sponsors love her to death. As does the public according to the ratings.

And these Walmart types featured in the this circus will soon be helping to elect the next POTUS. Like they did in the past.


ps: 'A 2013 Reader's Digest poll...revealed that Americans trusted Judge Judy more than all 9 justices of the United States Supreme Court.'

There's no business like show business. Ask Donald Trump.



Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
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