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Schlumberger Options
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, October 1, 2015 11:02:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2014
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Location: Lavender, Singapore
Hi,

Many, many years ago, I presented a study of a building which happened to be a Schlumberger HQ (I have since learned that Schlumberger is a German company). I didn't know it back then, and I pronounced it in an American English way i.e. "shlum-" not "shloom" and the last part "-ger" like the last part of "hamburger".

My teacher, who studied in Germany and spoke German corrected me, telling me it should be pronounced "schloom-ber-gee". The "Schlum-" part I have no question but the "-ger" part, was he right that it should be pronounced "-gee"? Does this mean 'Luxemburger' and 'Lebendiger' are pronounced 'Luxembur-gee' and 'Lebendi-gee'?

Danke.

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, October 2, 2015 5:18:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
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Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
You're certain to find a few German regions in which the -er (it's not limited to -ger) suffix is pronounced -ee or even -aeh. But these are parts of their dialects and not necessarily the 'received' pronunciation.

For the Luxemburger, Frankfurter or Wiener suffixes you should stick to the hamburger example. Whistle

I am not sure about the Schlumbergers, though, as they originated in France and are more likely to be pronounced /-ʒeɪ/ at the end; like 'jay', but without the /d/ sound in front.
Thus it is slightly different from both your and your teacher's version.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Priscilla86
Posted: Friday, October 2, 2015 6:40:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2014
Posts: 902
Neurons: 4,009
Location: Lavender, Singapore
IMcRout wrote:
You're certain to find a few German regions in which the -er (it's not limited to -ger) suffix is pronounced -ee or even -aeh. But these are parts of their dialects and not necessarily the 'received' pronunciation.

For the Luxemburger, Frankfurter or Wiener suffixes you should stick to the hamburger example. Whistle

I am not sure about the Schlumbergers, though, as they originated in France and are more likely to be pronounced /-ʒeɪ/ at the end; like 'jay', but without the /d/ sound in front.
Thus it is slightly different from both your and your teacher's version.


Schlumberger is French?? I have been such a fool...I just assumed from the word that it was of German origin. Now I can see how the mix-up probably came to be. /-ʒeɪ/ pronounced with an Indonesian accent could sound like '-gee' so probably my teacher actually pronounced it the French way but came out sounded like '-gee'. Thank you! I was always confused how -ger could become -gee =D

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Torispora
Posted: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 11:56:38 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/27/2016
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Schlumberger is not a german name, but a french one (from Alsace, where people spoke and still speak a german dialekt, and french too). The company is not german but french american, and probably now more american than french.
Schlumberger is pronounced with french pronounciation, "schloumbergé" approximatively "shloom-ber-gé" the same "é" we find in café or sauté. Obviously this pronounciation may have changed in America.
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