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GETTING ON TO NERVES Options
Chandrasekhar Krishnan
Posted: Monday, August 17, 2015 2:29:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2015
Posts: 136
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Location: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
She rattled on and on.. after some time, I couldn't stand it. I said " please don't get on my nerves"... Is it correct?
papo_308
Posted: Monday, August 17, 2015 3:00:25 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/29/2012
Posts: 1,124
Neurons: 24,304
Location: Velké Meziříčí, Vysocina, Czech Republic
Chandrasekhar Krishnan wrote:
She rattled on and on.. after some time, I couldn't stand it. I said " please don't get on my nerves"... Is it correct?


I'd probably say: Stop rattling. It's getting on my nerves.

I think that you can only say to another person to stop doing what they are doing, not to stop getting on your nerves.

But let's wait what the native speakers have to say.

Higgs271
Posted: Monday, August 17, 2015 3:20:19 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 6/12/2015
Posts: 85
Neurons: 581,617
Location: Orange, California, United States
Politeness always counts, but in some situations it's not enough to cushion the blows :)

I would say:

... Please stop rattling on. You're getting on my nerves.

And then she would say:

...What?? How dare you!

And then I would say:

... But I said "please"?! :(

And then bitter accusations and apologies and arguing and expensive flowers or jewelry would then follow :)

Rajinder Tyagi
Posted: Monday, August 17, 2015 3:28:12 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/13/2015
Posts: 190
Neurons: 2,254
Location: New Delhi, NCT, India
Chandrasekhar Krishnan wrote:
She rattled on and on.. after some time, I couldn't stand it. I said " please don't get on my nerves"... Is it correct?


"rattle on and on" means "to go on talking quickly for a long time about boring things". The use of this phrasal verb is correct. If a person gets on somebody's nerves, it means that the person is annoying the second individual. Hence, this use is also correct. Please note that this expression is used in informal language.
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