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das Kind Options
moniquester
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 12:03:49 AM

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The assignment asked for a translation which I once again got wrong:

The teacher asked the name of the child.

Um den Namen ______ _________ fragte die Lehrerin.

My response was

Um den Namen das Kind fragte die Lehrerin.

When I look up the word Kind, the article is "das," and I cannot think what other noun to place there to properly translate the sentence.

Thoroughly stumped. Need help again!!!

Be the change you wish to see in the world!-Gandhi
Harpagon
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 2:59:03 AM

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1. Die Lehrerin fragte nach dem Namen des Kindes
2 Nach dem Namen des Kindes fragte die( dise hübsche) Lehrerin.
3. Die Lehrerin fragte nach dem Kindsnamen.
4. Um den Name des Kindes fragte die Lehrerin

I think the first two translations and the fourth are correct. For the third one I am not sure.




Vergesst bitte nicht mich zu verbessern, wenn ich Fehler mache. Ich wäre euch sehr dankbar.
Harpagon
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 3:16:42 AM

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Like in English the name of the child is in genitive case.
The same thing is in german: der Name des Kindes. In your wrong translation you said: Um den Name das Kind...-the name the child, would sound in English, if I were to translate it.

Vergesst bitte nicht mich zu verbessern, wenn ich Fehler mache. Ich wäre euch sehr dankbar.
Tatsiana
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 3:40:03 AM

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nach dem Namen des Kindes. ('n'-Deklination)

I would use the variant with "nach"

Quote:
2. (jemanden) nach jemandem/etwas fragen eine Frage (1) stellen, um eine bestimmte Auskunft, Information über jemanden/etwas zu bekommen

(jdn) um etw. fragen - bitten
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 6:07:22 AM

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The question having been answered by my predecessors I'm beginning to understand the problem - apart from the genitive one.

Edit: As Tatsiana already mentioned (which I only just noticed), to 'ask (for) something' can have different meanings:

You can ask the waiter for another bottle of wine or you can ask your neighbour to pass you the salt. In these cases you politely beg for something. The German equivalent would be 'um etwas bitten'.

On the other hand 'ask' is used in the meaning of 'inquire', 'get information about', 'gain knowledge'. In this case the German word is 'nach etwas fragen'.

So, when the (apparently female) teacher asked for the name of the child, the sentence should have been 'Die Lehrerin fragte nach dem Namen des Kindes.'
You would only change the word order in this sentence if you really wanted to emphasize that it was the NAME of the child she wanted to know, not his or her AGE.

Thus, Harpagon, your first sentence is probably the best; your second one would be all right on the above mentioned condition and I'd forget about No.s 3 and 4.

Like our recent 'Bruderfreund' or the word 'Schwesterkind', the term 'Kind(e)sname' is a very antiquated word which you might find in older texts and - possibly - some official forms and documents. Your 'Muhme', 'Oheim' or 'Eidam' will have used those expressions. Whistle

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
moniquester
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 11:47:42 AM

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Thank you all! I'm still quite confused, because even the question as it is worded on the assignment, seems to be wrong, according to you both! So, now I am in the awkward position of having to point this out to the instructor, who may or may not adjust my mark.

Am I right? Your suggestion is:

"Nach dem Namen des Kindes fragte die Lehrerin."



Be the change you wish to see in the world!-Gandhi
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 12:13:58 PM

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Not really. As I tried to explain above, this word order is only used for emphasis.

The normal question would be "Die Lehrerin fragte nach dem Namen des Kindes."

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
moniquester
Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2014 1:32:28 AM

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Hi IMcRout!
The problem is that the question, as it was worded, changed the word order. But she had it "UM" den Namen des Kindes, and not "Nach dem Namen des Kindes ... " The changed word order threw me off, but also the genitive case. I was using the nominative, because it was at the beginning of the sentence. I know better, but forgot! Sometimes I don't recognize the construction for using other cases than the nominative, especially when the sentence is back to front.

Be the change you wish to see in the world!-Gandhi
rogermue
Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2014 2:44:50 AM

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moniquester wrote:
The assignment asked for a translation which I once again got wrong:

The teacher asked the name of the child.

Um den Namen ______ _________ fragte die Lehrerin.

My response was

Um den Namen das Kind fragte die Lehrerin.

When I look up the word Kind, the article is "das," and I cannot think what other noun to place there to properly translate the sentence.

Thoroughly stumped. Need help again!!!

---

A single sentence in the form "Um den Namen ___ ___ fragte die Lehrerin" is in my view didactically not very skilled.
1 The preposition "um" is wrong in this context. And the teacher probably does not know the use of "nach etwas fragen".
2 The word order of the sentence is unusual and should be explained. As a single sentence this word order is not normal.

The only correct formulation would be, as already said above: Die Lehrerin fragte nach dem Namen des Kindes.

But I wouldn't discuss this problem with the teacher. Teachers don't know everything and in foreign languages even
teachers can make mistakes or use a wrong construction. If you would discuss this problem with your teacher, he or she
would lose her face.
I assume your teacher is influenced by English to ask for sth and automatically translates "for" with "um".

moniquester
Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2014 10:54:38 AM

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I think so, Roger. She has said that German is not her native tongue. But then, why teach German?

Be the change you wish to see in the world!-Gandhi
rogermue
Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2014 3:48:27 PM

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Perhaps there aren't so many teachers of German nationality available. All my English teachers at school were Germans.
At university there were some mother-tongue teachers, but very few.
moniquester
Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2014 10:11:54 PM

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Thank you all! It's been quite informative!

Be the change you wish to see in the world!-Gandhi
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