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DID YOU KNOW? #7 Peanuts Aren’t Nuts! Options
hedy mmm
Posted: Saturday, November 30, 2019 1:26:27 PM

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Most people know that peanuts are not nuts—they are members of the legume family. We usually call everything else "tree nuts" and call it a day. But in reality, most of what we think of as nuts aren't really nuts at all, they're drupes!

Confused? Well, let's start with the definition of a nut. A true nut, botanically speaking, is a hard-shelled pod that contains both the fruit and seed of the plant, where the fruit does not open to release the seed to the world. Some examples of botanical nuts are chestnuts, hazelnuts, and acorns.

Many tree nuts are drupes, including walnuts and pecans (although confusingly these are known as drupaceous nuts as they difficult to categorise and are not true botanical nuts). Almonds, olives, peaches, coffee beans, cherries and plums are all classic drupes

So what's a drupe you ask? A drupe is a type of fruit in which an outer fleshy part surrounds a shell (what we sometimes call a pit) with a seed inside. Some examples of drupes are peaches, plums, and cherries—but walnuts, almonds, and pecans are also drupes. They're just drupes in which we eat the seed inside the pit instead of the fruit!

So what do we call all of these different oily seeds that we sometimes eat raw, and sometimes roast and sprinkle with salt or sweeten with sugar or honey, or season with cinnamon or chili powder? Well, the term "culinary nuts" has been coming into favor as a kind of catch-all description, and it's pretty good if you ask me. Nuts are defined as a simple, dry fruit with one seed (very occasionally two) in which the seed case wall becomes very hard at maturity. True nuts include pecan, sweet chestnut, beech, acorns, hazel, hornbeam and alder. Peanuts, almonds, pistachios, cashews, horse chestnuts and pine nuts are not nuts. So the health warning on a packet of peanuts (“may contain nuts”) is, strictly speaking, untrue.

Pecans
Pecan nuts aren’t nuts. They are drupes and rank among the top 15 foods with the highest levels of antioxidants according to the USDA. They are also a powerhouse of vitamins and minerals such as manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium, offering some wonderful health benefits.
The pecan is a species of hickory native to northern Mexico and the southern United States in the region of the Mississippi River. The tree is cultivated for its seed in the southern United States, primarily in Georgia, and in Mexico which produces nearly half of the world total.

Cashews
Cashews aren’t nuts. They are the seeds of the cashew drupe, a member of the poison-ivy family. The cashew’s seed lining contains a powerful irritant called anacardic acid (which is why they are never served or sold in their skins).
The botanical name Anacardium refers to the shape of the fruit, which looks like an inverted heart (ana “upwards” + kardion “heart”).
Unlike Brazil nuts, cashews really do come from Brazil. The Portuguese planted them in Goa in the late 1500s and from there they spread through Asia and Africa.

Walnuts
Walnuts aren’t nuts. They are also drupes. Their name in Old English, walhnutu, meant “foreign nut”, from wealh, “foreign” (also the root for Wales). This was because they were introduced from Gaul and needed to be distinguished from the native hazelnut.
Because walnuts resemble the brain, they were believed in medieval times to be able to cure headaches. More recently, Nasa has used pulverised walnut shells as thermal insulation in the nose cones of its rockets.

Horse chestnuts
The tree is Turkish and only arrived in here in the 16th century. The game “conkers” was first recorded in Newport, in the Isle of Wight, in 1848. The name may derive from “conquerors”, a game played by children for centuries that involved smashing live snails together, or from an East Anglian dialect term for snail shells (related to “conch” from the Greek konche).
They are called “horse chestnuts” because they were fed to horses to help with respiratory disorders. The Turkish name, atkestanesi, also means “horse-chestnut” and probably derives from the Latin Castanea equina.

Brazil nuts
Brazil nuts aren’t nuts. Like horse chestnuts, they are seeds contained in a capsule or pod, which splits apart. True nuts don’t split – the seed and the fruit are one and the same. Brazil nuts mostly come from Bolivia (in Brazil, they are called castanhas, or chestnuts). They grow at the very top of enormously tall trees, in round wooden capsules packed with between eight and two dozen seeds. When the pods fall the seeds are released.
A Brazil nut is 65 per cent oil. In a packet of muesli full of seeds, nuts and cereal, Brazil nuts always end up on top if you shake the packet; this is called the Brazil nut effect.

Coconuts
Coconuts aren’t nuts. They are drupes (from the Greek dryppa, meaning “tree-ripened”). Drupes are fruit with a fleshy outer coating enclosing a hard shell containing a seed: almonds, walnuts, olives, dates and coffee. The word “coconut” comes from the Spanish and Portuguese word coco, which means “monkey face”. Explorers found a resemblance to a monkey’s face in the three round indented markings found at the base of the coconut.
Coconuts contain coconut water, not coconut milk. The milk is made by grating the flesh into the water and straining it. Fresh coconut water is an excellent hangover cure. It is completely sterile, full of vitamins and minerals and is isotonic (it has the same balance of salts as human blood). You could survive on a desert island eating and drinking only coconut.

Peanuts
So peanuts, also known as groundnuts, earthnuts, goobers, pinders, Manila nuts and monkey nuts, aren’t nuts: they are a type of pea which grows underground. They are native to South America but now widely cultivated, notably in Georgia, in the United States.
Some people are so severely allergic to peanuts that eating a tiny amount can be fatal; but these people may not be allergic to true nuts.

PLEASE NOTE: There are many kinds of nuts, drupes, and seeds, however, these are pretty much the more popular ones in my country.

If there is a nut, a drupe or other kind of ‘nut’ not mentioned above, but is popular in you neck of the woods, please share that info...
I’m familiar with Indian (pecan), Brazilian (Brazil nuts), Turkish (horse chestnuts)...and obviously my own heritage...Puerto Rican (coconuts)...

I didn’t field the others that are in some of these categories, such as: sunflower, macadamia, pistachio, anise, sesame, kenepa, etc...BUT that’s for another thread! Whistle

Now, if you yourself are a nut...stay away! d'oh!


hedy mmm Dancing



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
taurine
Posted: Saturday, November 30, 2019 1:45:23 PM

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It may look like there are actually two categories, true nuts and sham.

Meine treue deine hande. Herzogtum.
hedy mmm
Posted: Saturday, November 30, 2019 3:15:07 PM

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taurine which one are you?

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
taurine
Posted: Saturday, November 30, 2019 4:04:40 PM

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Yeah, hedy mmm, this is a question I have not found an answer, yet.

Meine treue deine hande. Herzogtum.
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, December 1, 2019 3:08:26 AM
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I was interested to see that 'monkey nuts' is another name for peanuts. Searching on Google confirms this.

I have a distinct memory that I used to buy monkey nuts in the 1950s that were not peanuts. They were sold loose, without a shell. They were a little smaller than peanuts, had a tougher, wrinkled skin and had a stronger, sweeter taste than peanuts.

Does anybody remember these?
hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, December 1, 2019 9:01:56 AM

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Hey BobShilling, I’m glad you checked it out. Dancing I don’t thread anything that is not provable, (not that I thought you doubted it...I do my homework).
I never had a monkey nut. I think that it is more of a British peanut, but I could be wrong...

I didn't know that monkey nuts grew underground, but I did know they are part of the pea and bean family...and all other nuts grow on trees.
It was suggested that when you buy peanuts in their shells (known as monkey nuts) in the supermarket, don't get roasted or salted ones, I wonder why?

hedy mmm

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, December 1, 2019 10:56:54 AM

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hedy mmm wrote:
Hey BobShilling, I’m glad you checked it out. Dancing I don’t thread anything that is not provable, (not that I thought you doubted it...I do my homework).
I never had a monkey nut. I think that it is more of a British peanut, but I could be wrong...

I didn't know that monkey nuts grew underground, but I did know they are part of the pea and bean family...and all other nuts grow on trees.
It was suggested that when you buy peanuts in their shells (known as monkey nuts) in the supermarket, don't get roasted or salted ones, I wonder why?

Because they taste horrible! Bleah! LOL. I much prefer them raw, in the shell, and as large as possible. But that may be just me.

hedy mmm


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, December 1, 2019 11:50:02 AM

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Hey FounDit, my friend ...thank you for the warning!
One of my preferences are pistachios, not the red kind..they are Healthy, and delicious!
hedy

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
BobShilling
Posted: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 5:23:49 AM
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I have just learnt that I was talking rubbish in my earlier post. The nuts I was thinking of were tiger nuts.We did back then call peanuts 'monkey nuts'.

Old age has given me false memories.
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 10:43:36 AM

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Sorry BobShilling, rubbish is you thinking you are old! Shame on you

I bet I’m older than you...I graduated from college in 1965...I was 4 months shy of my 18th birthday...(I was moved up one year in school, guess I was already a nerd)d'oh!
...do the math! Think

I have a poem I memorized at around 7 yrs old. I’ll thread it today...It will be my ‘DID YOU KNOW’’ #8: “Signs You’re Getting Old” Series...dedicated to you! Applause

hedy mmm
Dancing

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
BobShilling
Posted: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 1:19:16 PM
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hedy mmm wrote:
Sorry BobShilling, rubbish is you thinking you are old! Shame on you


Not at all. I am old in the grand scheme of things - I have probably entered my last decade on this earth.

But I love it.

The savings and pensions I built up when I was younger mean that I haven't been obliged to work for over ten years.

In the country that is now my home, I can travel by rail for about a quarter of the price my (younger) wife has to pay. In most towns and cities, I can use public transport free - and anybody under the age of about fifty jumps up to offer me their seat if the bus/tram is full.

I get discounts in quite a few shops and restaurants.

The staff in shops don't get impatient if I put my card the wrong way into a machine or take my time counting out my coins. They help me load my shopping basket.

etc, etc.

If I known how great being old was, I'd have tried to get here sooner.
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 3:11:41 PM

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And the Senior Moments are always fun.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
BobShilling
Posted: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 4:04:10 PM
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FounDit wrote:
And the Senior Moments are always fun.


Thanks for that. It struck rather close to home, but I enjoyed it.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 12:02:39 PM

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hedy mmm wrote:
Hey FounDit, my friend ...thank you for the warning!

Well, I have to admit that many people like them roasted and salted. I, apparently, am not one of those people. But then, more than a few folks have commented on my umm...peculiar taste buds, accusing me of having none. I can't imagine why. I say I'm a super-taster! I know what I like, and I stick with that.

I don't like the red pistachios either, but haven't seen any other type. Perhaps because I never look for them. I love cashews, but they want too much money for them. I can afford them, I just don't like paying that much for them.

One of my preferences are pistachios, not the red kind..they are Healthy, and delicious!
hedy


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 2:46:46 PM

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Hey FounDit my friend, Dancing

‘Puritan Pride’ Online sells pistachios that are not painted red they taste delicious, a pound bag for $9.98, it’s more than worth it...they’re in the shells... they taste the same as the red ones except they don’t stain your fingers. That’s where I buy freeze dried fruit like pineapples, peaches, apricots and cranberries...but I freeze my strawberries, bananas and mango for smoothies ...my soon to be 15 yr old grandson loves smoothies and he pigs out on the fruit & nuts, especially the apricots and pistachios, they also have walnuts, almonds and eggnog covered almonds ...yikes let me stop talking I’m gonna get hungry! I’ll send you the link.

Costco has ‘Whole Fancy Salted Cashews’ ...you get a 2lbs,10oz (42 oz) container for under $19...they’re delicious and very healthy.

hedy




"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, December 7, 2019 6:32:15 AM

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When I was young (last century . . .) we could buy two kinds of peanuts:



One type was little, red and wrinkly - the other was about twice as big, pale and smooth.

Then there were monkey-nuts (same thing, but in pods).



Definitely raw - though roasted ones are quite good in salty caramel crunch! (Not very good for teeth!)

I do remember tiger-nuts, but not often - they were something we saw very occasionally.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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