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Is "on" redundant? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 7:59:03 AM
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Sebastian Lee, a member of the national sports association's management committee, confirmed to The Straits Times yesterday that Lim's last day of service was on Monday, adding: "Lim has spent more than 40 years since the founding of STF, contributing actively to the development of Singapore Taekwondo Federation and the propagation of the sport."

Is "on" redundant?

Thanks.

FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 9:46:48 AM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
Sebastian Lee, a member of the national sports association's management committee, confirmed to The Straits Times yesterday that Lim's last day of service was on Monday, adding: "Lim has spent more than 40 years since the founding of STF, contributing actively to the development of Singapore Taekwondo Federation and the propagation of the sport."

Is "on" redundant?

Thanks.



Yes, but it is so commonly said this way, no one would think about questioning it at all. I would never have thought to do so if you had not mentioned it.
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 12:04:18 PM
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Many thanks, FounDit.

Where I live, such a construction is so common that it has become "standard English"!
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 4:57:08 PM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
Many thanks, FounDit.

Where I live, such a construction is so common that it has become "standard English"!


I suspect this is true in a large number of languages.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 10:55:33 AM

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I guess that it's from the other way of stating the same thing:
"Lim resigned on Monday."
not "Lim resigned Monday."
The adverb is "on Monday".

However, the original sentence uses "Monday" as a noun ("the day").
The longer clause actually simplifies . . .
"Lim's last day of service was (on) Monday"
"The day was Monday."
not "The day was on Monday."
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 1:42:22 PM
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Koh - "Where I live, such a construction is so common that it has become "standard English"!"

I expect that's because in BE it IS standard English. Drago's post explains why; and that the difference just amounts to two ways of looking at the same thing from two different cultures.

Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 11:25:55 AM
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Romany wrote:
Koh - "Where I live, such a construction is so common that it has become "standard English"!"

I expect that's because in BE it IS standard English. Drago's post explains why; and that the difference just amounts to two ways of looking at the same thing from two different cultures.


Many thanks, Romany.

Another case of BE vs AE.
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 11:35:08 AM
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Yep.
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